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Publisher's Summary

By the renowned author of Things Fall Apart, this novel foreshadows the Nigerian coups of 1966 and shows the color and vivacity as well as the violence and corruption of a society making its own way between the two worlds. Winner of the Man Booker Prize for Lifetime Achievement, Chinua Achebe is universally recognized as one of Africa’s greatest 20th-century writers. In a work that foreshadowed the 1966 Nigerian coup, schoolteacher Odili feuds with his former mentor, now a corrupt government minister. When the two vie viciously for the same seat in an election, their fury leads to revolution.

©1966 Chinua Achebe (P)2010 Recorded Books

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
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Good Phonetics. Better Story!

The story was so good. All I could think of was the analogy "Run. Hide. Fight." I wished Odilli slowed down a bit and yet delighted that he was still able to find peace in the tumultuous journey he was faced with. The story had such great context and illustrated a new perspective of some common misconceptions.

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Entertaining. Gripping. Insightful. Educational.

Great book. Reading it for a class I'm taking on Developing Nations. The story Achebe tells , makes the the theory and concepts of your class come alive.