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Publisher's Summary

Earphones Award Winner (AudioFile Magazine)

Short-listed for the Man Booker Prize

Long-listed for the National Book Award for Fiction

Brace yourself for the most astonishing, challenging, upsetting, and profoundly moving book in many a season. An epic about love and friendship in the 21st century that goes into some of the darkest places fiction has ever traveled and yet somehow, improbably, breaks through into the light.

When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they're broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity. Over the decades their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he'll not only be unable to overcome - but that will define his life forever.

In rich and resplendent prose, Yanagihara has fashioned a tragic and transcendent hymn to brotherly love, a masterful depiction of heartbreak, and a dark examination of the tyranny of memory and the limits of human endurance.

Cover photograph by The Peter Hujar Archive, LLC, Courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco.

©2015 Hanya Yanagihara (P)2015 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"Oliver Wyman delivers an amazing performance of Hanya Yanagihara's (The People in the Trees) disturbing new novel… Thanks to Wyman's sensitivity, this introspective examination of male friendship, race, sexuality, and love truly resonates." (AudioFile)
"Yanagihara’s novel can...drive you mad, consume you, and take over your life. Like the axiom of equality, A Little Life feels elemental, irreducible - and, dark and disturbing though it is, there is beauty in it." (The New Yorker)
"Yanagihara has drawn a deeply realized character study that inspires as much as devastates. It’s a life, just like everyone else's, but in Yanagihara’s hands, it’s also tender and large, affecting and transcendent; not a little life at all." (The Washington Post)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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    4,771
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Performance

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
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  • Overall
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  • Story

Brutal, But Beautiful

I read an article in which the author compared the experience of writing this book to a "fever dream" - and that's actually similar to how I felt while reading it. Yanagihara's prose is so beautifully written, her characters so well-drawn, that I would go hours absorbed in her work, experiencing that heady feeling that only great fiction can induce. Yes, there are dark passages; scenes that will break your heart and make you angry. But there are also moments in this book that made me think deeply about the nature of friendship and love, forgiveness and recovery, and what it means to actually share your life - your past, your pain, your aspirations, your joy - with those you love. And while there's a brutality to A Little Life - a raw quality that often left me feeling as exposed as its characters - there was something in Yanagihara's writing that was wondrous; something that made me appreciate my own little life.

226 of 236 people found this review helpful

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I had to call in SAD to work

Any additional comments?

I was probably a quarter of the way into the novel before I texted my book buddy: "It's called A Little Life and you have to read it right this minute. I don't even understand why it's so unbearable and so beautiful." By the time I had a quarter of the novel left, I was walking around Walgreen's, to buy makeup to repair my cry-face, and sobbing. <br/><br/>This is not just a manipulative tearjerker. This is a genuine falling in love and mourning for and with the characters. I don't know if I am more in love with Jude or Willem--or perhaps with the love they have for each other. <br/><br/>This novel unfurls with a steady, patient, pace as the characters grow and change and, ostensibly, grow up. The depth of it is rather like John Irving, but without the width of the (often pointless) subplots. The author's widening and narrowing focus, however, is incomparable; I've not ever experienced the controlled examination of character, then whole world/context/relationship/effect. I'm not sure it's even nameable. Maybe something like Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, with the individual interpretations of self within the shared travesty. <br/><br/>A word about St. Jude. He sprang, fully formed, from Yanagihara's head--armed with his razor and armor of silence, and just as surely the child of an eater-of-innocence and Wisdom itself. The reader becomes as protective of Jude as everyone else, and when he is called "crazy" or "sick," you have to know it's true, but everything in you objects, even while you hope for his healing, or his willingness to heal. <br/><br/>In the living (beyond the merely reading) of this novel, I had to constantly construct and reconstruct my understanding of Jude, of Willem, my reactions, and therefore myself. In the end, I had to update my definition of love, of romantic love, of friendship, of parenthood, of selfishness/selflessness, and the meaning of one little life. This is the reason one reads, and the reason one writes. <br/>

239 of 252 people found this review helpful

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Heartbreakingly beautiful

Any additional comments?

I have listened to hundreds of books from Audible, but never felt compelled to write a review. This book moved me to tears several times and parts of it will stay with me forever. Beautifully written, beautifully narrated. Now I need a comedy!

96 of 103 people found this review helpful

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  • B.J.
  • Minneapolis, MN, United States
  • 10-29-15

Buyer beware: a five-star book with a big red flag

There are very, very few books that can be compared to this one. First, it is brilliantly written. It's smooth. It's a new take on an old subject. The author's talent is obvious. All of that is clear in any review you'll read. Second, the narration is absolutely perfect for the book and its characters. No question it gets a 5-star rating across the board. It's breathtaking, actually. And horrific beyond anything I can imagine.

The subject matter in this book - beyond the love and friendship, of course - is brutal. I'm not sure I'll ever be able to shake the mental images. In spite of the 32 hours I spent with this book in my ear, listening every chance I could get, I cannot recommend it. Please read what you can (without spoilers) about this book and make your own determination. You won't be disappointed with the quality of the writing or the narration. It's up to you if you can handle the topics.

254 of 275 people found this review helpful

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Four Stars But No Recommendation

The only reading experience I can compare to reading A Little Life is when I read American Psycho many years ago. I hated everything about that book. The characters, the plot, the structure, the narrative ... everything. Yet, I was compelled to keep reading until the end. I had to put it down every 30 minutes or so, wash my hands, and get my mind off of it But I finished the book. I had no choice. Regardless of the how I normally felt about the subject matter, something in Easton's writing compelled me forward with a very reluctant fascination. His craftsmanship made reading the unreadable not just bearable, but necessary. And since then I have compared many books and many authors to Easton and this particular book and most have come up short.

A Little Life was every bit as compelling and as difficult to read. I disliked the plot and while I also disliked many of the characters, my dislike stemmed from different reasons. The book was 700 pages of mind-numbing depression with very few moments of light. The subject matter was somewhat similar to American Psycho - the debasement of others - but told from a far more sympathetic perspective, the victim's, rather than the perpetrator's. And my dislike of the characters wasn't because they were at their core unlikeable - it was because most of them were too good, too likable. It felt like the author was sometimes counterbalancing the over the top violence visited on Judd with over the top "too good to be true" friends and supporters. Very few people in life would have the patience and perseverance to deal with Judd for 4 years, much less almost 40. Pity and compassion only go so far. At some point, to protect your own psyche you have to step away from the despair. And as he often admitted, Judd was a terrible friend. He never shared his past with others, never offered explanations for his obvious problems and strangeness and never allowed others to truly see him. Willem, who started out as a very interesting person, eventually becomes a saint, and no one is as boring as a saint. J.B. who was the least saintly of the characters was still too nice to be a foil against the other characters' saccharine.. Nor was it logical to assume that someone with as many mental and physical health problems, who was so dysfunctional in so many ways could have risen as high as he rose in his career. The buildup to the true climax of the book, or at least the point of no-return was done well and took me by surprise, but I had an issue with the end of the book. Judd broke his promise, a promise he evidently took quite seriously, based on the amount of time it was discussed in the book. Then he broke it and there was no explanation about how he came around to breaking it.

Yet the author wrote in such a compelling fashion I had to keep reading. Her wide base of knowledge about so many subjects was fascinating. Her prose was often lyrical and she skillfully made the unpalatable, palatable. At least palatable enough that you were willing to stomach it in order to get through the book. Her dialog, other than the endless apologies, was witty and sharp. The portrait she painted of the art world, New York City and so many other beautiful locales was lyrical. And the way she jumped over large chunks of time, then periodically went back and revisited small moments in those blank spaces could have been distracting, but it seemed to fit the characters well and it was easy to follow.

So my four stars are attributable to a a writer so talented she makes the reader willing to devote a large chunk of time to a story they would prefer not to hear. I would like to see her turn that talent on a story less maudlin and depressing. I can't really recommend this book however, no matter how skillful the author. If you do decide to read it, go into it with your eyes open. Do not expect to be entertained.

I listened to this, and the narrator, Oliver Wyman did a fantastic job.

204 of 224 people found this review helpful

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An extraordinarily long wallow in self destruction

Would you try another book from Hanya Yanagihara and/or Oliver Wyman?

No

What do you think your next listen will be?

Anything by Anthony Trollope.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from A Little Life?

It was horrendously long and drawn out. Lots could be cut.

Any additional comments?

Don't bother with this one unless you like to be tortured.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

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  • Carolyn
  • Calgary, AB, Canada
  • 12-31-15

What an emotional novel!

This novel is the most gut-wrenching, emotion draining and heart breaking book I have ever listened to! These characters came to life for me! All I can say is this what is not a light read and be prepared to listen to this all day and all night. Bravo, Bravo!!

17 of 18 people found this review helpful

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An Incredible Work of Literary Fiction

Any additional comments?

If there’s one thing I’m certain of, it’s that my co-workers, friends, and family are getting tired of me raving about A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara. And now when I have free range to unabashedly praise this incredible work of fiction, I feel as if I am at a loss of words. So I’ll just say this: A Little Life is a masterpiece. It’s a deeply-moving, emotionally-unsettling, yet occasionally uplifting saga of friendship and love spanning 50 years. Yanagihara took me into some of the darkest places in fiction I have been, and left me thinking about her characters long after the story ended.<br/><br/>

76 of 85 people found this review helpful

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Once of the most depressing and upsetting books I have ever read

This book does not have anything that is uplifting or positive in it. It is one terrible, horrific event after the other.

I would only recommend this book to someone who wants to punish themselves over and over listening to the most unimaginable atrocities.

14 of 15 people found this review helpful

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  • Jennifer
  • Morrison, CO, United States
  • 12-27-15

Had a little trouble with suspension of disbelief.

Let me preface this review by saying I am a medical professional, so my take on this book is obviously colored by my experiences and expertise. Overall, I really liked this book but found certain elements hard to swallow; most specifically Andy the orthopedic physician who continued to treat his friend for self inflicted wounds without at the very least getting a 72 hour mental health hold placed. In real life, Andy could and would be in danger of loosing his license for not following through on this. Also had a hard time accepting the fact that Jude would be released from any in-patient psychiatric facility after a drastic suicide attempt just because he failed to corporate with his therapist. That part would have bought him more time, not a ticket out.

But....I did like the characters (although I do agree with other reviewers that Willem was a bit too saint-like) and the way the story was laid out in bits and pieces throughout the novel.

IMHO, the end dragged, the novel could have ended quite a bit sooner without any loss of substance to the story.

44 of 49 people found this review helpful