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Publisher's Summary

Jack the Ripper may get all the fame, but his 1960s counterpart, Jack the Stripper, will really send shivers down your spine. At least six women, all prostitutes, were murdered at his hand - possibly more. Most intriguing of all...he was never caught.

The crimes, though often forgotten today, inspired the crime novel Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square, which Alfred Hitchcock turned into the 1972 movie, Frenzy.

Go inside the hunt for this brutal killer in this gripping short biography.

©2013 Minute Help, Inc. (P)2017 Minute Help, Inc.

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  • Andrew W.
  • 02-01-19

terrible

don't even think of purchasing this, audible should up its quality control and not allow rubbish like this on the site

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  • Anonymous User
  • 02-27-19

very disappointing

I should have followed the previous reviewer’s advice.

The 1 hour running time raised an eyebrow but with the lack of Hammersmith Murders audio books on Audible I thought I’d give it a go.

Extremely brief and yet padded out overview of the case. Seems like it’s been cobbled together using bits of Wikipedia and some book blurbs. Badly written too. Why there’s a rambling mention of the Goulston Street graffito (Jack The Ripper case) in the Introduction I don’t know. The narrator does a good job though.