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Explaining Postmodernism (Expanded Edition)

Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault
Narrated by: Scott R. Smith
Length: 7 hrs and 23 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (43 ratings)
Regular price: $19.95
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Publisher's Summary

Tracing postmodernism from its roots in Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Immanuel Kant to their development in thinkers such as Michel Foucault and Richard Rorty, philosopher Stephen Hicks provides a provocative account of why postmodernism has been the most vigorous intellectual movement of the late 20th century. 

Why do skeptical and relativistic arguments have such power in the contemporary intellectual world? Why do they have that power in the humanities but not in the sciences? Why has a significant portion of the political left - the same left that traditionally promoted reason, science, equality for all, and optimism - now switched to themes of anti-reason, anti-science, double standards, and cynicism? 

Explaining Postmodernism is intellectual history with a polemical twist, providing fresh insights into the debates underlying the furor over political correctness, multiculturalism, and the future of liberal democracy. 

This expanded edition includes two additional essays by Stephen Hicks: "Free Speech and Postmodernism" and "From Modern to Postmodern Art: Why Art Became Ugly".

©2004 Stephen Hicks (P)2018 Stephen Hicks

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Prepare to be well informed

A must read for anyone interested in the pervasive and diabolical influence of post modernism in news, the academy, politics, and other social movements.

Steven Hicks has distilled the history of the movement and its makers in a way anyone can understand.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Provacative

Compelling and interesting. May explain much of the current social - political climate of our day.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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over simplified garbage

paranoid, factually inaccurate, bias, over simplified, boring, and poorly composed. It seems like he has some good points but they are unfortunately lost because of his desire to tell a story instead of presenting knowledge or philosophy in good faith.

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Does not actually explain postmodernism.

The book is very well narrated and and engagingly written, so top marks on production values.

The bit where it falls over is that it is not an explanation of postmodernism: It's a polemic of a straw-man version of postmodernism that I'm pretty sure nobody actually holds.

The book sets up a caricature of postmodernism from the perspective of those who are opposed to it without really understanding fully as to why. It's an extremely hypocritical book given the amount of time it spends shaking it's finger at scarecrow postmodernists for not caring about objective truth, while itself showing absolutely no concern for its own misrepresentations of the truth of what postmodernism is actually on about.

If you don't like feminism, socialism, and/or progressive politics; if you want to sound as if you have good reasons backing up those emotions; if you don't care about accuracy so long as you can feel self-righteously justified; if you think capitalism a magical cure-all with no downsides; if you think that the only level of analysis that matters is the individual while acting as if the complex web of inter-dependencies that exist between us all either doesn't exist or is completely irrelevant? If you answered yes to these questions and others in that general theme, then you will *love* this book.

But if you're like me where you have a rudimentary grasp of postmodernism but you want to learn more before adopting an informed position about it? This book is trash: A total waste of time and money. Get literally anything else.

I'd exchange this audiobook if I could, it was utterly worthless to me.

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Brilliant

Highly recommended to everyone struggling to make sense of the Left and thinking they're all a bunch of idiots.

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A primer for PM's opposition

I read this to get a feel for the opposition to postmodernism, as my academic environment is heavily saturated in it. While this book is adequate to get a sense of Hicks' position, it feels lacking in supporting arguments. I was also a little disappointed that there wasn't much refutation of the positions opposed. The summary of philosophical history was well done, however.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful