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Dog Is Love

Why and How Your Dog Loves You
Narrated by: James Langton
Length: 8 hrs and 26 mins
5 out of 5 stars (51 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"Lively and fascinating...[t]he reader comes away cheered, better informed, and with a new and deeper appreciation for our amazing canine companions and their enormous capacity for love." (Cat Warren, New York Times best-selling author of What the Dog Knows)

Does your dog love you?

Every dog lover knows the feeling. The nuzzle of a dog’s nose, the warmth of them lying at our feet, even their whining when they want to get up on the bed. It really seems like our dogs love us, too. But for years, scientists have resisted that conclusion, warning against anthropomorphizing our pets.

Enter Clive Wynne, a pioneering canine behaviorist whose research is helping to usher in a new era: one in which love, not intelligence or submissiveness, is at the heart of the human-canine relationship. Drawing on cutting-edge studies from his lab and others around the world, Wynne shows that affection is the very essence of dogs, from their faces and tails to their brains, hormones, even DNA. This scientific revolution is revealing more about dogs’ unique origins, behavior, needs, and hidden depths than we ever imagined possible.

A humane, illuminating audiobook, Dog Is Love is essential for anyone who has ever loved a dog - and experienced the wonder of being loved back.

©2019 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing (P)2019 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

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Excellent summary of recent research

I especially hope that those who continue to hold onto “dominance theory” listen to/read this book. It’s a great translation of the current scientific findings on the dog-human relationship for us non-scientists, though I was previously aware of much of the material, I learned plenty of new things. Hopefully the vets, trainers and other professionals working with dogs who cling to old ideas will pay attention to these findings as well. It’s incredible to me that a puppy training class and vet’s office both advised me to use an alpha roll, among other punishing methods, on my gentle and sensitive little puppy. Overall, I really hope books like this bring these findings centrally into common knowledge and popular perception of dogs.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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well worth the time

very interesting but the history and research that must go in the book became tedious to me. if I wasn't working while listening, I'd rather have been playing with my dog.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Excellent

This is one of the best books I've read on dogs. The title sounds "touchy-feely", pretty anthropomorphic, traits I avoid in dog books. I'm interested in dogs for what they are, not as furry humans. They are unique, unlike other creatures in the ways they relate to our species. The human/dog bond is like no other. It is the nature of this relationship that Clive Wynne explores in this book, written for the general public but based on the latest scientific research on dogs and their relationships to other species, including our own.

The author approaches his subject skeptically, as a good scientist must. He discusses what experimenters have learned through direct observation, archeological discoveries, analysis of blood and urine, and brain scans. I will leave it to the reader to review these and come to their own conclusions on what they tell us. While I was familiar with most of the studies cited, this book integrates them and proposes a unified concept of our dogs' emotional connection to us.

In addition, the author explains how we are obligated by this new knowledge and understanding of dogs to provide not only for their physical needs, but for their emotional requirements as well. He suggests significant changes in practice and law that require our serious consideration. I agree with at least 90% of the conclusions and proposals this author suggests.

I enjoyed the book immensely, but more importantly, it has made me more sensitive to the social needs of my dogs. I recommend it for anyone who lives with a dog or dogs, or those for whom this is a serious consideration. Dogs deserve no less from us.