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Delayed Response

The Art of Waiting from the Ancient to the Instant World
Narrated by: Graham Halstead
Length: 7 hrs
4 out of 5 stars (8 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

We have always been conscious of the wait for life-changing messages, whether it be the time it takes to receive a text message from your love, for a soldier's family to learn news from the front, or for a space probe to deliver data from the far reaches of the solar system. In this book in praise of wait times, award-winning author Jason Farman passionately argues that the delay between call and answer has always been an important part of the message. 

Traveling backward from our current era of Twitter and texts, Farman describes how societies have worked to eliminate waiting in communication and how they have interpreted those times' meanings. Exploring seven eras and objects of waiting - including pneumatic mail tubes in New York, Elizabethan wax seals, and Aboriginal Australian message sticks - Farman offers a new mindset for waiting. In a rebuttal to the demand for instant communication, Farman makes a powerful case for why good things can come to those who wait.

©2018 Jason Farman (P)2018 Tantor

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love

fascinating book and a welcome, deep, idea for our time right now. recommend for everyone

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Sort Of Pointless

The narrator here is excellent but the content is aimless and pointless. It begins as an examination of "the art of waiting" and ends up as a meander of things loosely connected to this idea. I was quite looking forward to this but I found it to be a waste of a credit. You'd need to be very, very desperate for something to read to be worth your effort. This isn't to say it's not well-researched, it is. It's just nothing interesting. And it goes on and on...