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Publisher's Summary

Connectivity is the most revolutionary force of the 21st century. Mankind is reengineering the planet, investing up to 10 trillion dollars per year in transportation, energy, and communications infrastructure linking the world's burgeoning megacities together. This has profound consequences for geopolitics, economics, demographics, the environment, and social identity. Connectivity, not geography, is our destiny.

In Connectography, visionary strategist Parag Khanna travels from Ukraine to Iran, Mongolia to North Korea, Pakistan to Nigeria, and across the Arctic Circle to explain the unprecedented changes affecting every part of the planet. He shows how militaries are deployed to protect supply chains as much as borders, and how nations are less at war over territory than engaged in tugs-of-war over pipelines, railways, shipping lanes, and Internet cables. The new arms race is to connect to the most markets - a race China is now winning, having launched a wave of infrastructure investments to unite Eurasia around its new Silk Roads. The United States can only regain ground by fusing with its neighbors into a super-continental North American Union of shared resources and prosperity.

©2016 Parag Khanna (P)2016 Tantor

Critic Reviews

“Incredible. We don't often question the typical world map that hangs on the walls of classrooms - a patchwork of yellow, pink and green that separates the world into more than two hundred nations. But Parag Khanna, a global strategist, says that this map is, essentially, obsolete.” ( The Washington Post)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Rob
  • Ottawa, ON, Canada
  • 09-07-16

The juice for the next generation

I really enjoyed this book. It is dense but the macro concepts are so important. In a nutshell: Man-made borders are not as important as man-made supply chains. Nation building within man-made borders is not as important as group affinity - think along the lines of "I'm a Google'r" vs "I'm Canadian". Overall a really great read to understand how connectivity is the juice for the next generation.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Great book but the narrator is a drag

Would you listen to Connectography again? Why?

It's a great book for understanding the basics of geopolitics and the global economy. He makes some very interesting arguments about the effects of technology, trade, and urban migration on the relevance of political borders in much of the world.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Paul Boehmer?

Just about anyone.

Any additional comments?

It would be interesting to know how many times the word "connectivity" is repeated. Because it happens A LOT.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Returned due to the AI narrator. Horrible.

Any additional comments?

It is worthwhile to know things like (to paraphrase) 'armies no longer fight over borders, but for supply chains' however unless you like robotic like narration, I suggest you avoid.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

My favorite book of 2016

Very eye opening book on how global flows of information and trade are driving geopolitics.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

it's OK

many intersting points and examples but nothing revolutionary. the beginning was very dull and mandane, but became more interesting toward the middle

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Good

interesting thesis in this book. some parts are glossed over though, if they were expanded it might make an even more illuminating read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

Fluffy and Pretentious

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

You will enjoy this book if you are new to globalization.

What do you think your next listen will be?

I'm going to listen to a book on analytics.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Annoyance.

Any additional comments?

Rich on narrative, low on facts.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

The worst delivery EVER.

The topic is interesting, the delivery is akin to listening to Siri read, only worse. Speeding up doesn't help at all.

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    4 out of 5 stars

Takes a Global Commerce Perspective

First, the narration did not click with me - my mind tended to drift away from it's clipped cadence, but then maybe it was the writing's fault itself.

The coverage of the subject matter was very lightweight, though worldly-knowledgeable with details (names, places, events). The author's background is surprising, and accounts for his 'global' view.

The book offers solutions and projections, but into a philosophically clueless world that substitutes commerce for an enlightened philosophy, so as problem solvers, his suggestions miss the target.

The book is at its best when covering global commerce, and worst when being prophetic.

I learned bits of potentially-useful trivia, such as what an 'Investor's Visa' was and that 'Futurology' is an academic discipline now.

The author takes the usual cliche (and leftist) potshots at America, making erroneous claims that, from what I've seen, 'fashionably' besmirch the US (perhaps the author was playing to his prospective left-leaning, anti-American readership), such as the claim that the US's rise was due to a 'privilege of geography' over other nations, rather than admitting that it was the American tradesman character that was behind the economic rise of the country. This is because giving 'American Character' credit is taboo on the Left (remember Obama's 'You didn't build that' bungle), and so the author dutifully avoids doing so, to the point of offering such absurd counterclaims.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Listen on X1.25

Good book. Interesting premise with a mile wide of info a little more than an inch deep of backup. Worth exploring.

Almost didn't finish the first chapter because the narrator speaks so slow....X1.25 was perfect.