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Publisher's Summary

Live recording of Michael Perry performing humorous stories from Foggy Crossing, a small town in northern Wisconsin where one's true love is declared on bug deflectors, the state animal is the concrete deer lawn ornament, and the four food groups are cheese, milk, beer, and cheese. Topics addressed include high culture in low places, Fightin' Frogs football, parade floats gone bad, the fine art of manure spreader maintenance, coon dogs and the people who love them, things you should never say in an ambulance, Mavis Turner's Love Guide, and the truth about deer hunting in Wisconsin. Also, of course, this business about the cow.

©2006 Whistlers and Jugglers Press (P)2006 Whistlers and Jugglers Press

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  • Gypsycat
  • Madison, WI, United States
  • 02-26-15

for fans of Lake Woebegone & small town farm humor

Fans of Lake Woebegone would love this. This seems to be readings/performances from Michael Perry's books or essays and is all based on humorous hyperbolic tales of small town Foggy Crossing, WI. The stories are full of blustering farmers, gossiping farm wives, cows, trucks, and inept volunteer fire department volunteers. The material is funny but more predictable/cliched than Perry's other live recording (The Clodhopper Monologues). This one is told in a hokey "don'cha know" accent, and is told in third person rather than first person. I definitely prefer the latter title, which has a more natural delivery and comes off as more sincere storytelling than fictional performance. This feels more like a stage performance as a character than the author telling biographical stories live.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful