• Summary

  • Inspirational tales of the recovery journey - with Darren Waller, tight end for the Las Vegas Raiders, and Donny Starkins, international yoga instructor, mindfulness teacher, and personal development coach.
    Comeback Stories
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Episodes
  • Oct 7 2021
    After overcoming drug addiction that led to homelessness and prison, Tony Hoffman went on to acquire many great accolades. His goal is to motivate his audience through the methods he personally used to overcome his struggles into the one choice that can change the rest of their life for the better. Learn about the quote that Tony discovered in prison that unlocked the mental shackles he had placed on himself, and about Tony’s journey out of addiction and despair into a life of service and gratitude. Tony grew up in a typical middle class family where his parents worked all the time. His parents' absence very often meant that Tony had to figure things out on his own. He was naturally gifted at sports and fell in love with basketball despite being short. The biggest challenge as an athlete for Tony was that he didn’t have the life skills necessary to be coachable while growing up. Tony struggled with mental health issues because of the hole in his life where he needed his parents to be. Tony talks a lot about being 12 years old, which was the time in his life when he started to form his perspective on the world. His social anxiety led to self-loathing. He confessed his thoughts to his mother, but her inability to handle the situation only made things worse. Tony didn’t want to be treated like he was better than other people. He had to hire a sports psychologist to help him accept that he was gifted, and beating someone in sports doesn’t mean you are better than them. He ignored many teachers who tried to teach him about life when he was younger because he wasn’t ready to learn at that time. Tony’s first basketball coach was one of them. Tony quit racing at 18 to take a computer networking job in San Francisco. It was at that time he started experimenting with marijuana. This process of experimentation led to an oxycontin addiction which eventually resulted in Tony being a part of an armed house invasion of his best friend’s house to steal pills. Tony likens an opioid withdrawal to suffering from a flu that’s 100 times worse than usual, and you can get rid of the symptoms with a single pill. Tony’s rock bottom occurred a few years later where he was strung out on heroin and meth, and his brokenness made him lose all concern for himself. The drugs that he thought were fixing his pain were killing him, and he knew that and didn’t care. Tony had a spiritual experience on Jan 21, 2007 after being sentenced to prison. Tony tells people that he had been in a mental prison for 23 years, one that he created himself. Most people have created a mental prison for themselves without realizing it. While he was in jail, Tony saw a quote on the ceiling of his cell that changed his life. Tony realized that his gift was given to him for a reason and he became committed to getting out of prison and making the most of it. He decided that he would commit to doing the little things well and that would lead to making the big things better. Tony changed his narrative from quitting everything he ever tried to knowing that he is deserving of love and passing it on to other people.  Human beings seem to be the only beings on the planet that only take and rarely give back. Tony feels like that is the source of his discontent, and he can only feel fulfilled by giving and service to others. The pandemic has been challenging for Tony since he shifted so much of what he was doing to public speaking, but as long as he knows what his values are they will always lead him to where he is effective. Focusing on the house, or the car, or the wealth will always lead to an empty well. Understanding your core values is important because they are the bedrock for who you are. When you fall out of alignment with those core values, that’s when things fall apart. Tony views going to prison and being stuck with himself as a gift. It forced him to assess the times in his life when he felt happy and what his core values are, specifically determination, focus, compassion, and empathy. Being in prison highlights what really has value in your life. It shows how valuable your time is, your ability to walk and breathe and communicate with people in a way that inspires them. Tony’s definition of discipline is doing good work even when you don’t feel like it. This plays into Tony’s morning routine where it’s very regulated. One thing he focuses on in particular, is that when he’s in a vehicle he spends as much time as possible meditating. Tony’s sobriety model is based in spirituality and honesty. He needs to be able to be honest with himself and others, and quiet time is how he connects with his true self. Committing to be honest with yourself is the foundation for being a better person. There are many paths to sobriety. Use what works for you. If you’re struggling right now, talk to somebody who knows what you want help with. Sometimes something as simple as a conversation is all that stands between ...
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    45 mins
  • Oct 1 2021
    Carl Nassib joins us to do his first interview since coming out publicly in the NFL. His story is a testament for everyone to look deeper and realize that we all share similarities in this life of truth, discovery and triumph. In hopes to inspire the youth and bring further awareness about the LGBTQ community. Being the first does not mean having to stand alone. Carl felt he had a huge obligation to the LGBTQ community to come out publicly and tell his story. He did not come out publicly to break barriers. It wasn’t until 4 years ago when he actually realized he was Gay. He struggled with the idea that he needed to be someone else’s priority. He came from an Athletic family of 4 kids, his Mother, father and siblings were also in sports. Carl never lacked in Confidence, due to his mother who alway’s pushed him to be his best, keep a high standards. He never puts too much stock in things or people that put him down in life, only focuses on the things that brings him happiness. While in College at Penn State was the nation leader in sacks. Before becoming a Raider, he played for the Browns but was later cut from the team. This fueled his fire to play better and be the best. He learned early on to not focus on being like others but to be himself. Carl is the first active NFL player to come out publicly as gay, which coming out to his family was already stressful, however with the support of family and friends, this eased his decision to go public. He feels that if he can just help a few kids who are also finding themselves in a similar situation than it would allow him to sleep better at night. Teammates Darren Waller, Maxx Crosby have played a pivotal role inspiring Carl by telling their individual life stories in a team meeting. Choosing to come out publicly in the NFL has proven to be even more stressful, most would believe it to be the opposite. Your confidence shouldn’t be based on what other people say if you think you’re amazing because of what other people say, you don’t have confidence. Be confident seven days a week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
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    37 mins
  • Sep 30 2021
    Oliver Davis shares the story of how his love for football and the willingness to put in the work every single day eventually became the basis for his successful private coaching practice, and how setbacks can be blessings in disguise on your journey to doing what you love. Learn about Oliver’s 4D philosophy and why something as small as a 1% improvement each day can change your life completely. Growing up was competitive for Oliver, especially being the youngest kid in a large family. It was a challenge moving to Georgia after living for years in Texas, but overall it was fun. At the time, moving from a small town to another state was a big change and very disruptive to Oliver’s life and expectations, but looking back, it was the best move his family could have made at the time.  In many ways it was good for Oliver. He went from being a big fish in a small pond on the football field, to playing with guys that were bigger than he was, so he had to learn how to adapt. He remembers being frustrated with having to sit on the bench a good portion of the time, but Oliver always believed that if he put in the work he would get his shot. At the end of Oliver’s sophomore season, everything changed. His new coach came in and changed everybody’s mindset around grades and what it means to succeed in life beyond just excelling on the field. Oliver never made it to the NFL, but he knew that chances were slim being 5’8” tall and was more than happy being able to give it everything he had when he was on the field. Now he carries that same mindset into the world of business. The first real message that stuck with him came from his coach during his sophomore year who put grades first. He taught Oliver that he could be the next guy to come through and make a difference. It’s easy to think that some people are meant to be certain things, but some people work their way to being the best, and why can’t that be you? Oliver’s lowest point was in being barred from playing football during his senior year. He remembers going to a number of different camps and working with a number of different teams just to keep football in his life. He leaned on his discipline and took a major chance that eventually resulted in landing a position in the AFL. Oliver’s father was always a positive example of hard work and consistent effort in his life, and he demonstrated the pattern that Oliver could emulate and bring to the field. Once Oliver’s family was on the way, he knew he needed to start thinking about making money outside of what he was earning in the AFL. He got a job merchandising for Coca-Cola and quickly figured out a system that grew his route rapidly, born out of his mindset and discipline. Oliver started running into a ceiling on what he could earn and achieve at that job, so he pivoted into brokering and logistics. He didn’t know what he was doing, but he had the mindset of success and doing what it takes to figure things out. The whole time, football coaching was always on Oliver’s mind. He decided that he was going to make a go of turning his passion into a business while still working full-time. Oliver asked his boss for a probation period to give him some runway, and put up some videos on Instagram and jumped into private coaching. It’s a process to find your purpose. Some things aren’t going to work for you and that’s okay.  If people were really disciplined and didn’t just talk about it, and stayed true to what they want they would get what they want. The common thread through every story of success is they never gave up. Oliver never expected to be an entrepreneur, but all his experiences and training have moulded him to be the leader he is today.  Daily discipline determines destiny. The things you do every single day will lead you to where you are going to be. If you think you’re worthy of the things you want, honor that every single day. If you can get 1% better every day, you will eventually achieve all the goals that you’re working towards. It will just be a matter of time. If you’re struggling right now, it’s never too late to get yourself in order. There are multiple examples of people who achieved their success at the age of 50. Always know that no matter where you are now, you can make the choice to change and improve things. Be optimistic, think positive, and write things down. You have to be the first person to believe in yourself and set the foundation for you to build on. Oliver’s comeback story shoutout goes to his wife. She was the one person that never doubted him and could see the vision he had.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
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    52 mins

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Great Listen for Users and their support system

These two gentlemen really knock it out of the park with this podcast. They are very real, personal, intimate and complex. I enjoy everybody sharing their stories and not running from their past. This podcast promotes healing and growth. Kudos to both you gentlemen, job well done.