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Publisher's Summary

The Allegory of the Cave, or Plato's Cave, was presented by the Greek philosopher Plato to compare "[T]he effect of education and the lack of it on our nature". It is written as a dialogue between Plato's brother Glaucon and his mentor, Socrates, narrated by the latter.

Public Domain (P)2018 Combray Media

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

A difficult but interesting story.

A Book is a classic for a reason in this case you may struggle a bit but by the end you will consider it a ride worth taking.

Since it is short you have the luxury of listening to it again if the entire meaning of the story is not absorbed.

The Narrator did a good job bringing the story to the listener.



This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Kingsley
  • Henely Brook, Australia
  • 07-30-18

Allegory of the Cave and Philosopher Kings

This recording includes the entirety of Part VII of Plato's Republic, which includes not just The Allegory of the Cave, but also a much larger discussion on the education of the philosopher king (which is a larger theme of the entire Republic work).

The Allegory of the Cave is the basis for the philosophical idea of 'platonic objects' where what we see is not the true item, but a show of it. The chair you sit on has a 'chairness' about it, but it not a true, perfect, abstract object understood by Platonic idealism. It is but a show of the real chair.

The allegory is an important one, as it is a basis for much philosophical discussion.

The rest of the chapter, about the philosopher king, is interesting, but does not have the same impact on philosophical discussions. It talks about education requirements - training in fighting, warfare, gymnastics and didactic argument. So it's inclusion here is nice, but it isnt really needed if you are just looking for an understanding of the Cave.

Narration by Joesph Kent is good. It is easy to follow and has no production issues. It is on the quicker paced end of narration, which may cause some difficulty for following the dense discussions here.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Listen With The Written Version

I haven’t read Platos’s Republic nor the Allegory of The Cave. I have studied Plato and other philosophers, but college was a little while ago.
I believe either you need to be familiar with this piece or read the written format with the audio at the same time to get the full meaning of the piece.
Also to be familiar with Plato and Socrates...certainly a piece that is well worth the time to study. This piece has a great deal of depth and can’t be skimmed over.
I don’t believe the format or manner in how it was performed was helpful for me either. The speed and excited voice of Plato was off putting for me, too excitable...and then when Socrates answer in monosyllables it felt abrupt when Plato was the exact opposite. This piece would have benefited from a change in presentation.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review