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Publisher's Summary

A scintillating collection of tales with unexpected endings.

  • The Monkey’s Paw by W. W. Jacobs
  • American Sir! By Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews
  • The Rocking Horse Winner by D. H. Lawrence
  • William Wilson by Edgar Allan Poe
  • A Bottomless Grave by Ambrose Bierce
  • The Assignation by Edgar Allan Poe
  • The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry
  • Cannibalism in the Cars by Mark Twain
  • The Three Strangers by Thomas Hardy
  • The Finest Story in the World by Rudyard Kipling
  • The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  • A Terribly Strange Bed by Wilkie Collins
©1907 Public Domain (P)2013 Red Door Audiobooks

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Classic Tales Read in Ham-ese

These classic short stories are the sort of fare that ought to be included as foundational materials in any liberal arts education. If you've never read them, they are more than worth the effort and even if you have read them, this collection is an excellent refresher. However, that said, the narrator is unbearable. I normally appreciate a British accent but this particular reader's exaggerated phonation is like something out of a 19th century melodrama full of moustache twirling villains. For many, such grandiose affect may be just the thing to give voice to spine-tingling authors like Edgar Allen Poe. Personally, I found the pretentious enunciation distracting (and extremely annoying).Too much ham for me.