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Publisher's Summary

Widely regarded as the first English novel, Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe is one of the most popular and influential adventure stories of all time.

This classic tale of shipwreck and survival on an uninhabited island was an instant success when first published in 1719, and it has inspired countless imitations.

In his own words, Robinson Crusoe tells of the terrible storm that drowned all his shipmates and left him marooned on a deserted island. Forced to overcome despair, doubt, and self-pity, he struggles to create a life for himself in the wilderness. From practically nothing, Crusoe painstakingly learns how to make pottery, grow crops, domesticate livestock, and build a house. His many adventures are recounted in vivid detail, including a fierce battle with cannibals and his rescue of Friday, the man who becomes his trusted companion.

Full of enchanting detail and daring heroics, Robinson Crusoe is a celebration of courage, patience, ingenuity, and hard work.

(P)2008 Tantor

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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  • Overall
  • William
  • Midlothian, VA, United States
  • 03-02-11

Fantastic Story and Excellent Narration

Exciting storyline and excellent narration really brings this book to life. I could listen to Simon Vance read the phone book. :)

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

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Great story but with moments that made me cringe

Robinson Crusoe is a great story, but it has some cringe-able moments. The big one, the one I didn't remember from high school, was the purpose of Crusoe's voyage when he was shipwrecked on the island: he was the supercargo on a slave ship, intending to buy "slaves for trinkets" on the west coast of Africa, some of them destined for his own slave plantation in Brazil. It would be nice to report that by the end of the book, after his association with Friday, he came to realize the trade was evil, but such is not the case.

The first word he teaches Friday is the name he decided to call him by - the day of the week on which he rescued Friday from cannibals. (He never bothers trying to learn Friday's original name in his own language.) The second word he teaches him is the name by which he wants to be addressed: Master.

This bothered me enough that I spent some time looking up the history of abolitionism in England. Apparently it didn't really take off until another generation or two after the book was written (in 1719). So Defoe doesn't quite get a free pass in my book for this, but at least it can be argued that he was simply not ahead of his time on this issue.

Still, it's a great story, and well worth listening to. Crusoe pieces together a life of reasonable comfort, using flotsam from the wreck that stranded him on the island, and a bit of ingenuity. He keeps track of time by cutting notches in a post. He discovers living seeds among the trash he brought back, and by careful experimenting over several years, he is able to raise a respectable crop of wheat. He comes to a kind of accommodation with the cannibals who periodically visit the island: he realizes that he has no right to kill them just because he abhors their way of life.

But eventually he does kill a few and rescue one of their fellow cannibals, who was about to become a meal himself. This young man he names Friday. As Friday learns English and they begin having more substantial conversations, Crusoe tries to teach him Christianity. (I have to admit that I found Friday's questions and objections more persuasive than Crusoe's answers.) Eventually they are rescued and leave the island.

A major loose end in the plot concerns Friday's father and a small group of Spanish soldiers, whom Friday and Crusoe rescue from yet another band of cannibals. They return to the island they came from, where a larger group of Spaniards resides, to bring them news of Crusoe and the greater safety to be had on his island. But Crusoe returns to England before they get back. (This loose end is tied up neatly in the sequel, the Further Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.)

There are many excellent audio versions of this story available. The one by John Lee is also recommended. (It uses a different set of chapter breaks than this one: apparently Defoe published the story without breaks, and chapters have been added in different forms by later editors.) Simon Vance's version has a slight edge, in my opinion, because his Crusoe has a Yorkshire twang: Crusoe is, after all, a Yorkshireman. (My "expertise" in this comes from many years of watching Sean Bean and listening to Richard Sharpe audiobooks.) Vance, as always, gives a well-modulated, evenly-paced performance.

30 of 38 people found this review helpful

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  • Raleigh
  • greensboro, NC, United States
  • 03-21-17

the prodigal without a return


? would it interest you to read the first english novel ever written
? does man's relation to God and the natural world interest you
? do you find introspection and self-reliance to be admirable male virtues

daniel defoe's seminal novel has intrigued readers for centuries
it resonates with old testament judgement, themes and consequences
the story aligns with jonah, the prodigal son and the israelites' exodus

the writing style is surprisingly practical and matter-of-fact
obstacles and efforts and the necessary details of survival predominate
our hero is often disconsolate but rarely depressed or defeated

the book has a significant dose of well presented calvinist theology
defoe assumes that man " left alone " naturally orients toward God
the novel presents true faith and salvation as personal and not institutional

a friend of mine, in college, said he re-read " robinson crusoe " every year
as a young man, this seemed far fetched to me and a bit foolish
now that i'm a grandfather, his choice seems reasonable and even wise





2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • JB
  • 05-20-12

Stands the Test of Time!

This classic by Daniel Defoe needs no introduction from me to be familiar to Audible readers. It is the work that Defoe is most well known for, and if you have read his other works you know why. Defoe was a political and religious propagandist and because of this most of his works are philisophical in nature and tend to bore most readers. Robinson Crusoe was his attempt to roll his propaganda into a fiction form that would captivate a reader long enough for him to get his message across. His success with Robinson Crusoe is probably why his later fiction works become saturated with his belief system and tend to dry out quickly and leave the reader feeling like they are being preached to rather than a story told. With this book he strikes a good balance however and creates the masterpiece that stands the test of time.

Simon Vance was the perfect reader for this work, and really made it come alive. His reading of Robinson Crusoe did it justice and was truly enjoyable to listen to.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Great adventure book

one of my favorite books of all time. i've read this book several times growing up and have always found the imagry of daniel defoes writings exceptional. i like to listen to this on my mp3 as i work out at the gym

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Kimberly
  • ANN ARBOR, MI, United States
  • 02-07-09

Well worth the money

Inflection and accent of narrator is engaging. Almost as good as a dramatization. Four stars. I highly suggest this reading to college or high school students.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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If you think you know it, you are wrong

Any additional comments?

Don't pass by this book because you've seen too many movies of it. <br/>This book is surprisingly not like those movies. <br/><br/>Now I'm thinking those movies had other agendas. Listen and you might know what I mean. Stop trying to change history! Bad stuff happened and still happens.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Absolutely riveting! Great story and well narrated

I'm loath to see the poor reviews of this book based on the fact that Daniel Defoe includes the details of the protagonist, Robinson Crusoe, being associated with slaves and the slave trade.

Yes, slavery is abhorrent, loathsome, and wrong; however, dismissing the fact that it happened and was and is a part of our human history is even more so. Removing the less than flattering parts of our history from our minds and hearts poises us to revisit them again in the future. Learning from our past and shaping our future based on the lessons gleaned seems a far more prudent path.

Listen to/read the book. It's lovely - warts and all.

  • Overall

Amassing story

This is an incredible story one of the most fascinating books I ever listened to.

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  • Tod
  • Santa Barbara, CA, United States
  • 08-01-17

A remarkable reading of a wonderful work.

Any additional comments?

Simon Vance occupies prime real estate in my pantheon of audiobook readers. From Dickens to Defoe, he nails the classics like no other.<br/><br/>Regarding the novel: When I read certain other classics--I'm looking at you, Moby Dick--the structure can feel erratic and much of the story can feel tangential. I find it interesting, therefore, that one of the first English novels, Robinson Crusoe, is so exceptionally well-structured by today's standards. With one glaring exception (cough cough, bear attack) every bit of this novel mattered, and every bit of this novel fit with the others. There's so much written about it elsewhere that I won't go any further, except to say that it was a delight to experience, thanks both to the genius of its18th-century writer and to the riveting voice talent of our own century's Simon Vance.

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  • Sara
  • 06-22-09

Good Yarn

A interesting book which, theiving from Wikipedia, can be summed up by novelist James Joyce, who noted that the true symbol of the British conquest is Robinson Crusoe: "He is the true prototype of the British colonist. ? The whole Anglo-Saxon spirit is in Crusoe: the manly independence, the unconscious cruelty, the persistence, the slow yet efficient intelligence, the sexual apathy, the calculating taciturnity". I would add to that a man with a twisted and egotistical view of religion and a hypocrite, even by the standards of when the book was written (1719). Good book though, a bit slow in places and well read.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Miss
  • 02-21-13

Very good

I enjoyed listening to this book, but think I benefitted from listening first. I think reading through the book may have been harder work. Most is monologe (of course, if deserted by oneself on an island) and occasionally dragged. However if you have already read and love the book, you will not be disappointed with this audio version. The narration is very good. I was surprised by some phrases and idealogies, but then it was written a very long time ago, when the status of women, black people, and 'savages' was considerably different, and considered acceptable and normal.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Peter
  • 06-30-09

Historically interesting, Good story.

This book was interesting from a historical context and also a good story. The book was published on April 25, 1719. Its full title was "The Life and strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe of York, Mariner: Who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an un-inhabited Island on the coast of America, near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, where-in all the Men perished but himself. With An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver'd by Pyrates. Written by Himself". Great title for charades.

Novelist James Joyce noted that the true symbol of the British conquest is Robinson Crusoe: "He is the true prototype of the British colonist. ? The whole Anglo-Saxon spirit is in Crusoe: the manly independence, the unconscious cruelty, the persistence, the slow yet efficient intelligence, the sexual apathy, the calculating taciturnity." I found the book interesting for the different values and conflicting morals held by RC and the normality with which these values were accepted in that day. Historically informative.

A well-read book that keeps the listener interested.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • J. R. Mchugh
  • 12-24-16

Another Classic

The narration felt natural on this one once the story got rolling. I appreciated the slightly northern accent in context of Crusoe hailing from Yorkshire.

This is a relatively easy classic to digest...except for the nonchalant slave trade ventures and condescension towards all non-whites. Still, those reveal as much about the author's time than they do about Defoe.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Luiza
  • 03-05-14

Great

Where does Robinson Crusoe rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Great listen. Very enjoyable, one of the best books every written in English, in my opinion.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Robinson Crusoe?

There are many.

Which character – as performed by Simon Vance – was your favourite?

Robinson, of course.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

It would be Castaway

Any additional comments?

Great voice, good to listen to.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • John Zippo
  • 01-09-17

Superb

I loved this book...and Simon Vance's narration is nigh on perfection.. highly recommended... buy it

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Kamal
  • 03-05-17

Loved it

Really good story.
I assume one of my favourite books to listen to, The Martian, is based on this concept.

The attitude of the castaway is always what prevails.

There were a few aspects which I found all too convenient. But nevertheless, really enjoyed the story and would recommend.

I would recommend to anyone who enjoyed The Martian and for anyone who likes a diary-esq book.

I would also recommend this book as a break between a long series (in my case A song of fire and ice series) as it's easy to follow and will relax your brain as there isn't many characters.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • stephen
  • 07-12-15

The beginning of Mark Twain

I understand that this is the father of the British novel. I am also lead to believe that "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" is the Father of the American novel.
Now that I have listened to both (Pat Frawley reading Twain which I listened to first) it all makes sense. No question that this is great and the adventures of Huckleberry Finn is brilliant but I do see the literary connection.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Mr
  • 10-29-14

Good, but not great

Is there anything you would change about this book?

It needs editing. I actually like all the detail about how he survives on the island. It's the latter sections of the book that are the problem. There's a clear natural finishing point for the story but Defoe kept on writing beyond it.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

It's like the final Lord Of The Rings movie, it just didn't know when to end.

Have you listened to any of Simon Vance’s other performances? How does this one compare?

No but I will listen to more. Very very good.

Could you see Robinson Crusoe being made into a movie or a TV series? Who would the stars be?

Well I think it's already been done, but Desmond from Lost would be my choice.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • J
  • 07-02-13

An incredibly tedious novel read very well.

What disappointed you about Robinson Crusoe?

The novel is incredibly dull. I would never have made it through this if I didn't have to for a course. Almost the entire novel is about the minutiae of how to build things and live on an island recorded in unbearable detail, and elsewhere it is religious waffle.

What was most disappointing about Daniel Defoe’s story?

Really it is just how much time he spent on all of the tedious details.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

The discovery of the footprint is very effective.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Boredom. I just wanted it to be over - I even listened to it on fast speed to get through it quicker.

Any additional comments?

Robinson Crusoe is obviously an important book, but it is really not enjoyable. Even Virginia Woolf criticised Defoe's dry writing style. The novel has its merits, of course, but if you are hoping for an interesting story this is not for you. The reader is very good, but I would not recommend this book to anyone.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Tobi Ruth White
  • 03-19-16

excellent listen

Such a great read/listen. I can see why it is a classic. Well read too.