• Summary

  • Liz Lyon hosts YourClassical Adventures, a presentation of classical music for kids (and their grown-ups), produced by Melanie Renate. Join us as we ask questions that will help families explore classical music together!
    Copyright 2022 Minnesota Public Radio
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Episodes
  • May 21 2022

    What do you do when you are stressed, mad or sad? Do you go for a run to pound your feet on the ground, or maybe you pick up a paintbrush or an instrument? Join host Liz Lyon as we explore ways musicians have used tough moments in their lives to create pieces of music that helped them to feel better. Maybe this music can help you feel better, too.

    Episode 86 playlist


    Garreth Brooke and Anna Salzmann: Healing — Anna Salzmann is a visual artist who has partnered with composer and musician Garreth Brooke to present a musical and visual piece of art called Healing, which they hope can help people explore the emotional process of healing.

    LISTEN — Garreth Brooke and Anna Salzmann: Healing

    Garreth Brooke and Anna Salzmann: Healing
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    Johann Sebastian Bach: Partita in D minor for Solo Violin — Violinist Francisco Fullana had always found comfort in Bach’s music. He practiced music on his violin to help him heal while he was recovering from a shoulder injury. He also found comfort in the music by Bach during his time in isolation during the COVID pandemic.

    LISTEN — Johann Sebastian Bach: Partita in D minor for Solo Violin

    J.S. Bach: D minor Partita for Solo Violin
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    Joshua McGhee: Let God Bring Tomorrow — Joshua McGhee is a talented multi-instrumentalist, meaning he plays more than one instrument. He has been commissioned to write pieces of music in response to some tragic events. Let God Bring Tomorrow was written in response to a mass shooting.

    LISTEN — Joshua McGhee: Let God Bring Tomorrow

    Joshua McGhee: Let God Bring Tomorrow
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    You can now search and listen to YourClassical Adventures where podcasts are found.

    Explore more from YourClassical Adventures!

    What are you curious about?

    You must be 13 or older to submit any information to American Public Media/Minnesota Public Radio. The personally identifying information you provide will not be sold, shared, or used for purposes other than to communicate with you about things like our programs, products and services. See Terms of Use and Privacy.

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    5 mins
  • May 15 2022

    A metronome is a musical device that produces a clicking sound to help you keep a certain tempo. You can snap your fingers or tap your foot to keep tempo, too. Join host Liz Lyon as we listen to classical music pieces with a wide range of tempos. One tempo is so slow that the piece of music lasts more than 600 years!

    Episode 85 playlist

    John Cage: Organ² (As Slow As Possible) — When this piece was written, composer John Cage did not specify a tempo. This offered a quirky opportunity to musicians: How can someone truly play this piece as slow as possible? Some musicians have spent 12 or more hours playing this piece, but in a church in Germany, a single chord of this piece is held for 2,527 days before it moves on to the next.

    LISTEN — John Cage: Organ² (As Slow As Possible)

    John Cage: Organ²
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    Arvo Part: Spiegel im Spiegel — If you hold a mirror facing forward and stand in front of a mirror, you will see that your reflected image is repeated over and over for infinity. The name of this piece is German and means, “Mirrors in the Mirror” which refers to an infinity mirror and the infinite number of reflected images.

    LISTEN — Arvo Part: Spiegel im Spiegel

    Arvo Part: Spiegel im Spiegel
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    Niccolo Paganini: Moto Perpetuo — A “virtuoso” is someone who is highly skilled in music or other creative art. Niccolo Paganini was the most celebrated violin virtuoso of his time. If you learn any violin techniques, you will likely be learning techniques he developed.

    LISTEN — Niccolo Paganini: Moto Perpetuo

    Niccolo Paganini: Moto Perpetuo
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    Camille Saint-Saëns: Samson and Delilah - Bacchanale — Camille Saint-Saëns was a French composer, organist, conductor and pianist. Before he was even 3, he was curious about the piano and had the ability to identify a musical note without assistance.

    LISTEN — Camille Saint-Saëns: Samson and Delilah - Bacchanale

    Camille Saint-Saëns: Samson and Delilah - Bacchanale
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    Johannes Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 4 — This is only one of 21 total Hungarian Dances that Brahms composed, all inspired by Hungarian folk music and Hungary’s deep tradition of dance. They were originally written for piano and were later arranged by Brahms and other composers to allow a full orchestra to present these pieces.

    LISTEN — Johannes Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 4 

    Johannes Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 4
    by



    You can now search and listen to YourClassical Adventures where podcasts are found.

    Explore more from YourClassical Adventures!

    What are you curious about?

    Submit your feedback

    You must be 13 or older to submit any information to American Public Media/Minnesota Public Radio. The personally identifying information you provide will not be sold, shared, or used for purposes other than to communicate with you about things like our programs, products and services. See Terms of Use and Privacy.

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    5 mins
  • May 8 2022

    This time of year can bring a lot of interesting storms. Join host Liz Lyon as we use our imagination to picture thunderstorms while discovering classical music that was inspired by the rain, wind and rumbles of these storms.

    Episode 84 playlist


    Eric Whitacre: Cloudburst — Handbells, a thunder sheet, bass drum, suspended cymbal, wind chimes and piano all accompany an eight-part choir. The added claps, snaps and thick smacks by the singers help bring a thunderstorm to life through song.

    LISTEN — Eric Whitacre: Cloudburst 

    Eric Whitacre: Cloudburst
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    Ludwig Van Beethoven: Pastoral Symphony — This was one of only two symphonies that Beethoven named. Using your imagination, can you recognize what parts of a thunderstorm the instruments mimic?

    LISTEN — Ludwig Van Beethoven: Pastoral Symphony

    Ludwig Van Beethoven: Pastoral Symphony
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    Michael Kamen: The Eye of the Storm — American composer Michael Kamen was well known for his scores to many movies you might know, including The Iron Giant, X-Men, The Avengers and 101 Dalmatians. This piece is from The Iron Giant and helps to set the mood for an unknown object crashing through Earth’s atmosphere in the middle of a storm at sea.

    LISTEN — Michael Kamen: The Eye of the Storm

    Michael Kamen: The Eye of the Storm
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    Ferde Grofé: Grand Canyon Suite - Cloudburst — The Grand Canyon Suite includes five movements that paint a specific scene that is typical of the Grand Canyon. The movements are “Sunrise,” “Painted Desert,” “On the Trail” and “Sunset,” with the fifth and final movement, “Cloudburst,” portraying a storm in the Grand Canyon.

    LISTEN — Ferde Grofé: Grand Canyon Suite, 5. Cloudburst

    Ferde Grofé: Grand Canyon Suite, 5. Cloudburst
    by



    You can now search and listen to YourClassical Adventures where podcasts are found.

    Explore more from YourClassical Adventures!

    What are you curious about?

    You must be 13 or older to submit any information to American Public Media/Minnesota Public Radio. The personally identifying information you provide will not be sold, shared, or used for purposes other than to communicate with you about things like our programs, products and services. See Terms of Use and Privacy.

    Show more Show less
    5 mins

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