• Summary

  • Customer and user behaviors can seem irrational. Shaped by mental shortcuts and psychological biases, their actions often appear random on the surface. In the Choice Hacking podcast, we'll learn about these "predictably irrational" behaviors and how to use them to create incredible customer experiences.
    2020 - Choice Hacking
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Episodes
  • How Walmart Used Psychology to Perfect Its Experience

    Aug 13 2021

    [0:21] – Jennifer reveals this episode's topic as Walmart and its psychological methods.

    [2:42] – Check out the new Choice Hacking course – How to Create Persuasive Experiences!

    [3:41] – Walmart, as Jennifer shares, is well known for its everyday low prices.

    [4:20] – Learn about Sam Walton, the founder of Walmart.

    [5:25] – Jennifer explains how Walmart keeps customers coming back, discussing behavioral scripts.

    [6:57] – Jennifer talks about Walmart's action alley and how it disrupts customers' behavioral scripts.

    [7:15] – We learn about a behavioral science principle called salience bias.

    [8:02] – Walmart also drives its sales using the anchoring effect, which Jennifer describes and explains.

    [10:00] – Jenifer asserts that the use of anchoring in pricing indicates that most customers don't know how much an item should actually cost in isolation.

    [10:31] – Walmart strives to deliver value to customers, not just low prices.

    [12:14] – Jennifer reveals why brand names are so powerful when it comes to creating a perception of value, crediting the authority principle.

    [12:55] – Walmart is always evolving.

     

    Links and Resources

    Choice Hacking - Website

    Choice Hacking Mailing List

    Jennifer Clinehens – Choice Hacking: How to use psychology and behavioral science to create an experience that sings

    Choice Hacking - Twitter Page

    Choice Hacking - Instagram Page

    Choice Hacking - YouTube Channel

    Jennifer’s LinkedIn Page

    Choice Hacking - How to Create Persuasive Experiences

    Free Trial of Monday.com

    Walmart – Website

    Sam Walton – Made in America

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    14 mins
  • How Trader Joe's Defeated Choice Overload

    Jul 20 2021

    [0:14] – Jennifer opens by discussing Trader Joe's and its popularity.

    [2:07] – Jennifer explains what Trader Joe's is to someone outside the United States who might not be familiar with it.

    [2:58] – We learn that one reason for Trader Joe's success is its limited choice.

    [3:49] – Jennifer refreshes us on what the choice overload principle is.

    [4:30] – Research has found four predictors as to when choice overload will appear, the first being choice set complexity.

    [5:04] – The second predictor is called decision task difficulty.

    [5:25] – The third predictor of choice overload, we learn, is preference uncertainty.

    [5:54] – The fourth and final predictor is the decision goal.

    [6:27] – Jennifer explains how Trader Joe's reduces choice overload, beginning with giving customers fewer but better options.

    [7:38] – Trader Joe's also reduces choice overload by never having a sale.

    [8:52] – Jennifer reveals the third and final way that Trader Joe's reduces choice overload – not letting brands compete for shelf space.

    [9:59] – We learn how we can apply Trader Joe's methods to our own businesses and brands.

    Links and Resources

    Thank you so much for listening to the Choice Hacking podcast. If you want to learn more, check out the links below for resources. 

    //Join  + Follow

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    //Support

    Buy the Choice Hacking Book and Audiobook

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    //Sources

    How Trader Joe's Uses Psychology to Perfect Its Experience 

    Disclaimer:  Some resources include affiliate links, which means if you click them and buy something I get a small monetary kickback at no additional cost to you :)

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    12 mins
  • How Peloton Used Psychology to Perfect Its Experience

    Jun 15 2021
    Time Stamps[0:37] – Jennifer opens by discussing exercise and its connection to hyperbolic discounting or Present Bias.[2:22] – Jennifer talks more about the overall topic of this episode – how we can apply Peloton's strategies to our own businesses.[3:49] – We learn a little bit more about Peloton, such as when it was founded and why its users are so obsessive.[4:44] – Peloton gets people on the bike using the Sunk Cost Fallacy.[5:20] – Default Bias also plays a role in how Peloton gets people on the bike.[5:47] – Peloton also uses the Halo Effect to get people to use their bikes.[6:42] – Jennifer explains what causes people to keep getting back on the bike and making it a habit, referring to the habit loop.[7:18] – We learn about the Mere Exposure Effect.[7:48] – Jennifer talks about the Simplicity Effect.[8:23] – The second part of the habit loop is the routine itself, which Jennifer elaborates on.[9:17] – We learn about parasocial interactions and what they have to do with how Peloton gets users hooked.[9:55] – Jennifer explains the last part of the habit loop – reward.[11:17] – Jennifer lauds Peloton for the incredible feats that it has accomplished as a company.[11:39] – We learn how we can apply some of the behavioral science methods that Peloton uses to our own businesses. Links and ResourcesThank you so much for listening to the Choice Hacking podcast. If you want to learn more, check out the links below for resources. Choice Hacking - WebsiteChoice Hacking Mailing ListJennifer Clinehens – Choice Hacking: How to use psychology and behavioral science to create an experience that singsChoice Hacking - Twitter PageChoice Hacking - Instagram PageChoice Hacking - YouTube ChannelJennifer’s LinkedIn PageFree 30-Day Trial of Audible PlusPeloton – Wikipedia ArticleTom Huddleston Jr. - “How Peloton exercise bikes became a $4 billion fitness start-up with a cult following”Behavioral Economics – “Default (option/setting)”Behavioral Economics - “Halo effect”Reegan Von Wildenradt - “Hugh Jackman Shared His Personal Best Peloton Workout Results on Instagram”Natalie Sherman - “Peloton: 'It's borderline addiction'”Richard Branson TweetCharles Duhigg - “How Habits Work”Sachin Rekhi - “BJ Fogg's 5 Secrets of Behavior Change”Jeanette Settembre - “Fitness apps with workout plans retain members longer than gyms”Brynne C. DiMenichi & Elizabeth Tricomi - “The power of competition: Effects of social motivation on attention, sustained physical effort, and learning”Will Feuer - “Peloton stock plummets after the company reports widening loss, slowing revenue”Endurance Hour - “Secrets To Beating the Peloton Leaderboard at Home on the Endurance Hour” (YouTube Video)Disclaimer:  Some resources include affiliate links, which means if you click them and buy something I get a small monetary kickback :)
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    14 mins

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