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Publisher's Summary

When corporate leaders or the organizations they represent mess up, they face the difficult decision of whether to apologize publicly. A public apology is a risky move. It's highly political, and every word matters. Refusal to apologize can be smart, or it can be suicidal. Readiness to apologize can be seen as a sign of character or one of weakness. Because the stakes are so high, Barbara Kellerman says, leaders should not extend public apologies often or lightly.

- From the April 2006 issue of Harvard Business Review

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©2006 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College, All Rights Reserved; (P)2006 Audible Inc.

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Exemplary Work by Kellerman, Apology & Leadership

It's interesting to note how effective a good, well-timed and genuine apology can be. It's a true mark of leadership, when one recignizes the need to atone.