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Publisher's Summary

For the first time, the entire BUNKER series, with over 600 five-star reviews, is being offered in a single audiobook title as Born to Fight. Get your copy today -- over 27 hours of non-stop action!

Cyber-attacks. EMPs. Invasion. War. When the end comes, few will have the ability to survive.

Jack Bunker vowed to never step foot on another battlefield. But the former combat engineer’s new peaceful life in the Colorado mountains is shattered after an attack takes out America’s power grid. When suspicious activity plagues the nearby high-security military facility, Bunker fears he’ll soon have another war on his hands. 

As the story unfolds, Bunker suspects a foreign invasion is imminent, leaving him no other choice but to somehow transform the mild-mannered townsfolk into military-grade guerrilla warriors. He knows if their small town surrenders, America won’t be far behind. 

But his plan won’t be easy, not when his makeshift troops begin to pry into his painful past. Sharing the truth with them could cost him their trust, but he’ll never earn their command by keeping what haunts him a secret. 

Born to Fight is a non-stop, high-octane, post-apocalyptic thriller. If you like pulse-pounding action, resourceful warriors, and political intrigue, then you’ll love Jay J. Falconer’s explosive tale of true American grit. 

Listen to Born to Fight now to join the fight for freedom! 

Rated R for violence and language.  

©2018 Jay J. Falconer (P)2018 Jay J. Falconer

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Performance

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Story

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Epic Saga

Absolutely loved this collection. Military tactics, intrigue, international geo politics, human interest, a touch of romance, topped off with terrorism and patriotism.
It doesn't get any better than this.

The narrator nailed each and every character in this story. Outstanding!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Okay, if you can get past the eyrolls

The idea of the story is good, but the author is one of those (many, unfortunately) authors who has absolutely no idea how to present relevant, common sense concepts in the flow of a story.
The narration is well done, but it is almost impossible to get through a 5-10 minute side-tangent on exactly "how the main character's gut feels when he's really hungry... like a pack of piranhas, working their way from the stomach... and on and on and on and on and on and on" or some similar subject - at least once every other chapter.
Here's what I think: The author, who at least does seem to have a decent sense of humor, decided he wanted to do a post-apocalyptic novel that he could do some "teaching moments" in, but then picked the most bizarre places to do them.
He also wanted to make sure he got in all his descriptive adjectives, metaphors and other colorful prose, but picked the most bizarre ways to present them.
Here's a great example. . The main character is about a 3 hour walk from town, but wakes up after being knocked unconscious by a Russian mortar, and decides he's in "full survival mode." He then proceeds to gather up all the remnants of garbage from someone's campsite (to include the very colorful description of snot and boogers all over used kleenex) and then prove how much "survivalin'" he can do from a few implements.
This includes (I am not kidding), spending hours flintknapping a stone knife, gathering everything he will need to smoke out the bees and other ridiculous wastes of time to help him pry inside a beehive in order to get the honey for food (as opposed to walking for a few hours back to town)
And this is only on day 3 of post-apocalyptic America!
Anyway, if you can get past all the eye-rolls, it's a mildly entertaining story with some humor here and there.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Solid Post Apocalyptic thrill ride.

Well thought out, good background research. Enjoyed both the story and the performance. Many who write in this genre fall incredible short, Jay Falconer doesn’t.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Kill'em all...p.s.I love you.

Brutal and graphic, them or us, good vs evil. But the good have Jack Bunker and he is fierce, he doesn't hesitate, he is Rambo with a past looking for a redemption. And then there is love all around involving various persons in the story, "A little house on the prairie" kind of love. Shoot their heads off or even cut it off so we can live happily on our prairie. Why are those bad guys here anyway? Anyone?

Nevertheless, I liked listening to it. Excellent narrator makes up a flawed storyline. It's a feel good story were everybody get what they deserve with almost inhuman Jack Bunker on a roll with IED's like "toe poppers".

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • David
  • Opelika, AL, United States
  • 08-28-18

Not The Best.

I listened to about 6 hours and I had to quit. It was ridiculously boring and even the action barely kept my attention. Also, the author did very little research on tactics and firearms. It appears as though he went to a bar and got tactical advice from a drunken hillbilly. Basic google searches would have corrected the inaccuracies.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Alright story, not my favorite writing

The overall story was fine, I just didn't like the writing. The writing seemed a little childish

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent

I've read probably 75 different post apoc books. This is one of the better ones. Great story and engaging characters.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

It hurts

I could not finish this book. It jumps around too much. The characters are not believable. No one first impulse goes to cooking meth on day two of an EMP to supply etc etc. An engineer that can’t figure stuff out?

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Ehhh

The book had an okay story line. Probably the worst of the books in this sector. The author spent way to much time describing details that were very mundane. The book should have been written better and they switch in story lines was off! An okay read if you have a free credit. But DO NOT pay for this book. Very frustrating to follow. Climax is weak and the resolution is no where it needs to be for a good conclusion.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Unique Plot and Character Offset by Glaring Errors

The plot is not your normal TEOTWAKI plot. So, if you’re worried about this being just like all the rest, it aint. The main character and several other characters are pretty interesting – not your stereotypical good guys or bad guys.
A lot of the writing seems to be based on experience – or at least pretty decent research, but some of it really annoyed me. For example, at one point a character goes to get his $2,800 double-barrel, pump, Benelli shotgun with 28” barrels that he keeps under the counter at his store, because it’s the perfect gun for that purpose. If you don’t see anything wrong with that statement, you’ll probably love this book.
Another character is looking at a rack of firearms, focusing on the first two “rifles,” whose distinctive pump action and tube under the barrel making it obvious that they are pump shotguns. Again, if you don’t see the problems with that statement, read on.
I don’t think the writer completely understands the difference between 7.62X39 and 7.62X51 or .223 and 5.56 calibers, and his treatment of the different types of bullet configurations is inconsistent.
There are too many absolutely unbelievable coincidences in the book. For example, the story takes place in a small town in Colorado (a few hundred people - small). 3 of the characters in the book that have recently stumbled into the town through random, unconnected life choices – not only have a shared connection to the criminal culture of Los Angeles, but they have actually interacted with one another. Without some connection, the odds of 3 people arriving at this remote town at the same time are low. The odds that all 3 would be from the same state are really low. The odds that they would all be from Los Angeles are astronomically low. The odds that they would all be part of large criminal organizations would be ridiculously low. And the odds that they would have all interacted together is ludicrous.
At one point I was thinking that I would not be surprised if the main character isn’t ultimately saved by having an alien shark fall out of the sky and land on the main bad guy at the end of the book or something similarly ridiculous.
There are several other, similar logical inconsistencies and unbelievable coincidences in the book.
There are some interesting outdoor survival hacks, discussion of small group tactics, etc…. But the other issues strain the credibility of the text.
Another interesting thing is that 3/4s of the way through the book, one of the level-headed characters analyzes a bunch of newspaper clippings and suddenly comes to the apparently irrefutable conclusion that the catastrophe is the result of a conspiracy between Russia, China, the American deep state, and Walmart.
Finally, the writer adopts a common, politically correct, but inconsistent position on torture. Regardless of what you might think of the morality of torture, like many authors, when the good guys are being tortured, everyone in the story knows it’s only a matter of time before they break and tell the bad guys where the rest of the good guys are. Everybody breaks. But when someone is threatening to torture a bad guy, one of the protagonists is like, “Oh no. It’s evil. And everyone knows that information gained from a person under that kind of strain cannot be trusted, because they just make stuff up to make the pain stop.” The inconsistent assumptions annoy.