Bloodsisters

Narrated by: Chantel Turner
Length: 9 hrs and 16 mins
Categories: Fiction, Horror
4 out of 5 stars (6 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

From the author of the horror classic Night of the Living Dead.

Thirteen members of the Deadly Coven of Diana. Thirteen powerful witches pledged to bloody vengeance on all men. And soon, there will be another member... 

In a small New York State college, beautiful 18-year-old Laura Clark is blossoming, reaching out for love and trying to escape her controlling mother. But for Laura, there is no escape. Not from her mother, not from the unnameable horror that haunts her dreams, and not from the coven's spell of darkness.

All her life, they have kept secret her true identity. Now, she is ready. And so are they. Now, they will teach her the art of love and ritual murder.

©1982 John Russo (P)2019 Capricorn Literary

What members say

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Thrilling!!

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

Wow! What a thriller! A scary, heart pounding, mystery ride.

Draws you in start to end!!

5 stars!! narration was excellent

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  • RJ
  • 01-02-20

They don’t tell, don’t swell, and grateful as hell

As the book started out, I began to worry that I had made a mistake. I found myself in a psychological thriller with more character psychoanalysis than you could shake a stick at. All the pieces were seemingly disjointed and I had no interest in anything in particular. I had to find out what I was missing. As the story unfolded and more pieces were revealed, it began to pique my interest. The story morphed into a psychological who-done-it and I couldn’t stop listening. Our MC Laura wanted to know who her father was, ultimately discovering much more than she bargained for. I can’t tell you anymore, just stick with it and I’m sure you’ll be satisfied. I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

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  • Norma Miles
  • 01-23-20

Everything is written in the stars.

It started well: a mysterious call to a father whose baby daughter had been stolen three years previously. A ransom had been claimed and paid but the child was not returned. Not daring to believe the call on this, little Laura's fourth birthday had she still been alive, her still grieving father nevertheless agrees to meet the sexy sounding woman just in case she really does know, as she claimed, where the child was. This opening chapter was intriguing, horrifying and promised much.

Fast forward then in time. Laura is in her first year of university, a psychology major. She is painfully shy, her mother, an astrologer, is over protective. But still Laura does form an awkward friendship with another student, a young man named David - and it's all downhill from here. The story is ill thought out with later unresolved inconsistencies, which cannot be rehearsed here without destroying the story line. Characterisation was mostly superficial and Laura was just, well, dumb. The narration by Chantel Turner was quite good, with reasonable pacing and good intonation, but was flat and downbeat which failed to excite the immagination (though was probably a good representation of Laura's personality). And there were some editing glitches with repeated lines not tidied from the text.

Bloodsisters had the potential of being an original and scary horror story, a real psychological thriller. But it needed to be better thought out and stripped down to its essentials rather than trying to cram everything in, like, for example, the pseudo erotic scenes. Well edited and reconstructed, this could be a formidable book. As it stands, however, it's rather silly and disjointed, not a book I'd recommended.
I was fortunate in being freely gifted with a complimentary copy of Bloodsisters, from the rights holder, at my request. Thank you.