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Publisher's Summary

In this intimate dual memoir, Sue Monk Kidd and her daughter, Ann, offer distinct perspectives as a 50-something and a 20-something, each on a quest to redefine herself and to rediscover each other.

Between 1998 and 2000, Sue and Ann travel throughout Greece and France. Sue, coming to grips with aging, caught in a creative vacuum, longing to reconnect with her grown daughter, struggles to enlarge a vision of swarming bees into a novel.

Ann, just graduated from college, heartbroken and benumbed by the classic question about what to do with her life, grapples with a painful depression. As this modern-day Demeter and Persephone chronicle the richly symbolic and personal meaning of an array of inspiring figures and sites, they also each give voice to that most protean of connections: the bond of mother and daughter.

A wise and involving book about feminine thresholds, spiritual growth, and renewal, Traveling with Pomegranates is both a revealing self-portrait by a beloved author and her daughter, a writer in the making, and a momentous story that will resonate with women everywhere.

©2009 Sue Monk Kidd; (P)2009 Penguin

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
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Performance

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Story

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  • Overall
  • Lisa
  • Portland, OR, USA
  • 11-21-09

Laughter and tears

I appreciated every moment of listening to this deeply heart and spirit touching memoir of a mother and daughter journey into themselves and out into the world, together and solo. I lamented the final moments of the book and had wished for it to continue. Hearing the authors rendition of their writings and the interplay between mother and daughter took me on a spiritual and international journey during which I could taste, smell and feel in a way that really good writing can trigger. I highly recommend this, especially in the audiobook version.

15 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • KarKinz
  • Chesapeake, VA, US
  • 04-24-12

Not my Favorite Fruit.

I cannot say that I liked much about this book.
I kept wanting to scream, "Get over yourself".
I am a self-reflective person, but would not want to subject my ruminations to others in the manner which this author used in "Traveling with Pomegranates".

If pressed to choose one thing that I enjoyed, it was the younger Kidd's reflections and delivery.
I feel very differently about her mother's reading. This is what I liked the least.

Sue Monk Kidd should have had another read her book aloud. She has some very very strange pronunciations of many words. I am not speaking about her southern accent. It was the distinct pronunciations, which were annoying and distracting. I cringed when she said "bass" relief. Mirror was repeatedly pronounced "mir-oh". Many of the Greek names were mispronounced. Even the word "daughter" had an odd tilt to it.

(Are there no editors or sound engineers, producers, etc. to sit in on the readings? I would have not even been able to finish the book, if it were not necessary for my bookclub participation.

I felt Kidd bored the reader with belabored points. This could have been a much more effective short story, than the endless chapters she presented.

'Very disappointed in this book.
I'd rather eat my pomegranates, than travel with them.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A bit boring

Would you try another book from Sue Monk Kidd and Ann Kidd Taylor and/or Sue Monk Kidd?

I love Sue's fiction but this bored me. Maybe you had to be in their exact situation. I felt like Ann was the more interesting story as she discovered she wanted to write. Sue seemed to be overthinking everything. Suffice it to say I made it through the whole book but only barely. And I never backed it up to see what I missed if I caught myself daydreaming.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

An ok book that never quite grabbed me

Is there anything you would change about this book?

This book needs a stronger story line.

What could Sue Monk Kidd and Ann Kidd Taylor have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

I'm not at all sure. I felt like I was reading someon'e "finding me" story from the 60's. It seemed dated and there wasn't a story to grab hold of.

What three words best describe Sue Monk Kidd’s performance?

Forced, dull,

Did Traveling with Pomegranates inspire you to do anything?

No

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Liked the readers!

My mother had read this book and recommended it to me and to my daughter, also. I really enjoyed listening to the authors read. I heard the drawl of their accents and the inflections of the creators of these words.
Thanks to Sue and Ann for your honesty and vulnerability.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

relective

If you could sum up Traveling with Pomegranates in three words, what would they be?

this book inspired me to go to Greece. Content was reflective: 2 women going through change. I enjoy Sue Monk Kidd's writing and was glad I read it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Thoughtful

The voices of the mother and daughter shine with love for each other. Rather you are trying to find yourself in your 20s or your 50s this read is for you. A smart book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

OK, not great

I am a huge lover of all things Greek, and I had read Sue Monk Kidd's _Dance of the Dissident Daughter_ (actually assigned it to a class) and found it very intriguing. And as a 50-something woman with young daughters, it all seemed like the perfect read was about to come my way. But honestly, it as too navel-gazing for my tastes. I don't know what it would be like going around in the world waiting for signs and portents meant just for you, but to me it just seems narcissistic. Oddly, I found the daughter's story far more compelling than the mom's.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Absolutely Great - for young and mature women alike

Really loved BOTH their stories, and how they intertwined them together. As I struggle having turned 50, I gained insight from Sue’s tale, and Ann’s was a trip down memory lane from my youth. In many ways, a great self-help listen. Reminds me of Big Water Passage and Eat Pray Love. Want more!

  • Overall
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Horribly disappointing.

Not sure it its just boring or if I really don't like SMK's narration. And I'm a southerner.