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Publisher's Summary

The Minefield Girl is based on Sofia Ek´s personal experiences as a young woman doing business in Libya while Gaddafi was still at the top of his reign. Her mission was to present Libya to the Western world of big business via the pages of the Wall Street Journal’s magazine SmartMoney. Sofia finds herself facing one setback after another as she learns to navigate Gaddafi’s Libya, where nothing is what it appears to be. She discovers that she is watched at every turn. 

A love affair proves to be both thrilling and dangerous, as she gradually realizes that the country’s most powerful men have ways to control even people’s personal lives. Moving with determination through the corridors of power, consumed by her desire to succeed and to be part of something bigger than herself, Sofia remains blissfully unaware of the minefield she has walked into. 

Sound design by Rich Macar, Buttons NY. 3D spatial audio by VisiSonics.

©2018 Lissie Entertainment AB (P)2018 Lissie Entertainment AB

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    63
  • 4 Stars
    69
  • 3 Stars
    74
  • 2 Stars
    47
  • 1 Stars
    43

Performance

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
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    82
  • 4 Stars
    61
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    61
  • 2 Stars
    34
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    42

Story

  • 3 out of 5 stars
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  • 3 Stars
    67
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  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars

Glad this was a special offer, free, not worth using a credir

I stuck with the listen, just because I thought the main character might eventually show some mature thinking, but it never happened. Maybe, that was the point of the whole book. She continually boasts of how great she is, how tasteless every situation is, and really doesn't give the listener any reason to admire her accomplishments or abilities. I probably will not ever listen to another book by this author or this narrator as it would be too painful and boring.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Seriously

Pretentious. Naive. Privileged. Self centered. Culturally unaware. This young woman is an example of delusional thinking at its best. If any of this is too be believed as anything near the truth it’s beyond any average sense of first world entitlement. And to top it all she wants her dark haired “love” to take revenge on the evil son of a cruel dictator not because he slaughtered his own people while living a life of unearned luxury which she willingly participated in but because she has sold her self sexually and ethically for her own financial gain. What a great example for young women everywhere. I hung around till the end for some sense of mea culpa or self redemption only to hear her self congratulation at her great victory over exactly what is sadly nothing.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

a spoiled girl's love story

A girl travels to Libya with absolutely zero research on the country beforehand. I was hoping for an exciting book but all I got was a spoiled girls love story.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Noise

The background noise throughout the story was extremely annoying and made it very difficult to concentrate on the person speaking .

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Wonderful book about alibis

I love this book as I were always curious to know what will happened next. Good book to know about a country’s culture and environment

9 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

I want a refund!!

I know this was a free book from Audible, but...I want my "free" back!

This [supposedly] "true" story had enough to keep me interested, but only because I kept thinking that it had to get better. Or maybe the main character would get torn apart by lions or something.

The writing was probably on a 5th grade level. There were a SURPRISING number of poor choices of words or phrases that became distracting and eventually, comical. For example, in describing a conversation, she writes "It was as though everything he was saying was just an entree, and he was waiting to present the main course." How does this make it past the editors?

In another instance, she is expressing how happy she is for the driver who lost all this weight, and how she knows what it is like to have been bullied in school while growing up, but in the same paragraph, describes her co-worker as "geeky" when he walks up and he and the driver have a knowing laugh at the co-worker's expense.

There are so many examples of condescension, ignorance, arrogance, indignation and self-importance that it's nearly impossible to not dislike the "protagonist". She has such a high opinion of herself, and describes all these situations that are obviously there to make her look cool or together or accomplished but it has the opposite effect. She looks...immature.

I eventually got to thinking that perhaps, this was actually *brilliant*--that all along, she was TRYING to expose Sofia's immaturity, naïveté, blatant cluelessness as character development, illustrating where she was at the start of the story, and how she grew up and matured and learned about the Libyan people and practices and culture and business along the way. But to my disappointment, that never happened!

The performance by Camilla Belle is equally cringe-worthy. Or...another example of brilliance as she portrays Sofia Levander as the proud, spoiled, ignorant tramp that she was in this book? It was a symbiosis of incompetence: the poor writing making the performance worse than it could've been, and the poor performance making the writing even more unbearable. And...maybe do some research into how to correctly pronounce Libyan names and places? That might help make you sound less childish. And stop using a hard-G sound at the end of words like "wrong", or "song", or "boring". That's not how English works.

Finally, there was the added sound effects throughout. If the author talked about a phone ringing, or buzzing, there would be that sound. If there was a crowd of people around at a party, there would be that background noise during the reading. If there was a phone conversation taking place, the party on the other end sounded like they did in 1970. For the first chapter or two, it was novelty. After that, it was just distracting and underscored how this was more akin to a comic book than a serious work of non-fiction.

I seriously hope this doesn't start a new trend on how audio books are going to be produced. I hope this was just an experiment that went horribly wrong. The beginning and end of each chapter was punctuated with some kind of music. It was supposed to be mysterious our suspenseful or somehow set the scene. But it was SO LOUD! I listen with headphones, and when the reader is at a comfortable volume where you can easily hear and understand, it's great. And then this weird music crescendos and my ears start bleeding. If it was music, it was bad enough. But one or two times, it was just this high pitched squeal. It was horrid. I laughed out loud when I read another reviewer's comments about it when [s]he stated that [s]he thought the brakes were failing!

All in all, this was a disaster. Judging by the reviews by HuffPost, Vogue, Billboard and others, and the pageantry that heralded the release of this book, I think it's fair to say that Sofia Ek has no friends close enough to tell her the truth that this book sucks.

I know it was free, but it truly wasn't even worth my time, and I'm an angrier, more jaded person because of it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Background noise and music was interesting

At first I was distracted by the background sounds but then I think it definitely accentuated the story line. The music was sometimes louder than I would have liked.

The story itself was surprisingly entertaining and the narration was well done. This was a pleasant listen. Thanks audible!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

This was a free audio book

The insight on Libya was interesting, and I feel more enlightened about the country after reading this book. I am glad a read it. I found the background noises and music distracting, overly loud, and sometimes jolting me out of the story, especially when they were cellphone rings or car honks that could have possibly been real. I wish they were not included. I also feel like it was read or written very simply, as if not by a professional or not to the standard I have grown accustomed to. I was unsympathetic to the main character and felt that her ego was a bit too healthy while being overly critical of others. She was fond of telling us about her good looks, wise choices and superb abilities, it could have been turned into a drinking game. I did not like her.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Good story cuz it true

Thoroughly enjoyed her truthful story (hopefully truthful) of her time in Libya at a crucial time in history. Didn’t care for the sound effects/dramatic music. It was much louder than the spoken words and found it irritating at times.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Loved the narrator Camilla Belle's energy

The story is not my cup of tea but the narrator Camilla Belle made it interesting.
There is music and ambient sounds on the background and they can get very annoying and loud at times.
The story has some "time jumps" sometimes making it a bit difficult to follow.
Its nice to know more about a distant land like Libya