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Publisher's Summary

In a real-life version of Little Big Man comes Indian captive narrative of Herman Lehmann. He was captured as a boy in 1870 and lived for nine years among the Apaches and Comanches. Long considered one of the best captivity stories from the period, Lehmann came to love the people and the life. Only through the gentle persuasion of famed Comanche chief, Quanah Parker, was Lehmann convinced to remain with his white family once he was returned to them.

Lehmann saw some of the most dramatic changes in the western United States from a perspective few whites had. He didn't just play the part...he was living as an Indian. His struggle to readjust to white culture is detailed here as well. At the time of this writing, he was married with five children, although he maintained the ties to his Indian friends and family for the rest of his life.

Every memoir of the American West provides us with another view of the movement that changed the country forever.

©2015 Big Byte Books (P)2017 Big Byte Books

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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The Savagry of Native Americans

In the Texas/New Mexico territory in the 1870s, Herman Lehmann was an eleven year old boy living with his family when he was taken captive by the Apache. Marvin Hunter, the editor of Lehmann’s book, did a good job leaving Herman’s raw voice in the book which gives the reader a story told with a true sense of authenticity. I definitely learn a fee things that I didn’t know about the Apache and Comanche such as they both ate raw uncooked meat from animals they killed. That they ate the entrails of the animals immediately after killing them and sucked the blood out of them. The Indians captured and enslaved white women and children. They also were thieves. And they had no mercy towards the frontiers people that they attacked. It would s very easy to understand why people called them savages and hunted them furiously. I learned that squaws that didn’t commit to the monogamous relationship with their husband had their noses cut off. The life of an Indian maiden was not pleasant. The book was interesting in the sense that once a captive Herman pleaded a life long bond to the Indians.

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Very good story but

Out side of the miss Pronunciation of places it was very good. Very interesting and informative. After listen to this I will get to book for my collection an read it my self.

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Nine years among the indians

I enjoyed this book very much with all the decriminalization of living with them and his return to the family