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Publisher's Summary

When his daughter, Amy—a gifted doctor, mother, and wife—collapsed and died from an asymptomatic heart condition, Roger Rosenblatt and his wife, Ginny, left their home on the South Shore of Long Island to move in with their son-in-law, Harris, and their three young grandchildren.

With the wit, heart, precision, and depth of understanding that has characterized his work, Roger Rosenblatt peels back the layers on this most personal of losses to create both a tribute to his late daughter and a testament to familial love. The day Amy died, Harris told Ginny and Roger, “It’s impossible.” Rosenblatt’s story tells how a family makes the possible out of the impossible.

©2010 Roger Rosenblatt (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Critic Reviews

“A painfully beautiful memoir telling how grandparents are made over into parents, how people die out of order, how time goes backwards. Written with such restraint as to be both heartbreaking and instructive.” (E. L. Doctorow)
“[A] beautiful account of human loss, measured by the steady effort to fill in the void.” (Publishers Weekly, starred review)
"[A]n exquisite, reserved little memoir…." (National Public Radio)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    80
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    97
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    57
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Performance

  • 3.7 out of 5.0
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    76
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    65
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    53
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    25
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Story

  • 3.4 out of 5.0
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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A little gem of a book

Yes, this is a sad story, but it is so lovingly told by Rosenblatt that it's worth the listen. The author handles the heavy topics of death and grief gracefully, weaving daily household tasks into this memoir of survival in the face of a family tragedy. I may be a bit partial to this story because I can relate to it more than I'd like, but found this tribute to Rosenblatt's daughter and her children very moving.

17 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Poignant true life story of death's aftermath

What did you love best about Making Toast?

The story was sad. A young woman dies of an unknown heart issue and leaves a husband and 3 young children. The grandparent's move in and help raise their grandkids.

Who was your favorite character and why?

I liked Harris, the husband the best. He isn't in the story much but when he is it's great. When the Grandpa complains about interference from someone outside of the family, Harris just gives him a look that says it all. I hope he is able to move on some day and perhaps remarry. Too young to have lost the love of your life.

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

It's always hard when an author reads their own book, but he does a good job. He lived it and it shows.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I did listen to this while making Thanksgiving dinner. I was very involved in the story.

Any additional comments?

Kudos to these grandparents. I don't know if I could do what they have done. I am about the same age but would not want to raise anymore children at this stage in my life.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Perlroth,
  • Portola Valley, CA, United States
  • 09-11-10

A personal tribute to his daughter

Nice prose. Personal dedication. A paean to a suddenly deceased daughter. Anger transfigured into grand-parental caring and self-sacrifice and poorly submerged anger with fate and God and justice.

A touching, if over-long tribute.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

abrupt ending

Very good read but the end was abrupt. I wish the author could have finished the ending of this true, sad story, without such abruptness.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Gentle and beautiful

Roger Rosenblatt's record of his family's pain and strength after his daughter's sudden death is full of wisdom. It's a good reminder of what matters, and a beautiful story of a family moving on well (because it's the only good choice they have before them), while cherishing stories and memories.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A Father's Grief Told Beautifully

This memoir about the death of his 38 year old married daughter, is a heart wrenching and a lovely tribute of a daughter, mother, wife and sister told with emotion and depth. The author reads this book, which truly adds to the entire book. A wonderful gift to a daughter and the entire family she has left behind that is simply one of the most memorable books I have heard. Highly recommend this audible version especially. Unforgettable.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

What? No Warts at All?

First of all, let me start off by saying that, unlike some of the other reviewers, I did not find the book overlong or disorganized. I did, at times, have a little trouble keeping track of the chronology, but I took it as it came because I saw the book as a set of "short stories" rather than a memoir. And I thought that the author, Roger Rosenblatt, Amy's father, was far and away the best narrator.

Yet I find the reminiscences to be overly idealized at best and sugarcoated at worst.

What came through loud and clear was how precious Amy Rosenblatt Solomon was to her father, her mother, her husband, her extended family, and all of her many friends, and how deeply she was missed. And I'm sure that her good qualities far outweighed her bad. But still...

I know it is bad form to speak ill of the dead, but I also think Roger Rosenblatt did Amy a great disservice by turning her into an unvarnished, untarnished Saint. I think she would have been a lot more humanized if her father had recollected her having an occasional meltdown, or making a snide remark, or being in some other situation in which she was not at the top of her game.

And, surely her children were extremely traumatized by her death, yet, while the two older ones were seeing a child psychologist to work through their feelings, everything was depicted as "fine, fine." Their schoolwork didn't suffer, and they didn't seem to suffer more than the usual childhood kinks.

Her husband, as well, was deeply wounded, but I didn't hear much about that, either.

I think this extended essay was a form of therapy for Mr. Rosenblatt, and I guess he didn't want to violate anyone's privacy, but why publish it if you are not going to present a well-rounded narrative?

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Very touching account

Great look into a family coming together to cope with the loss of a key family member. Extra special in that the author is the narrator.

  • Overall
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  • Story

Making Toast - A very scattered memoir

My deepest sympathies to anyone who has lost an adult child.
This memoir/story was a sad retelling of memories and the grandchildren moving on. The author didn't focus on any subject for more than 60 seconds. His thoughts were scattered and disconnected.
The family obviously has great wealth, knows many famous people and lead privileged lives. Death and grief visited them none-the-less. His tone gave the impression that they should be exempted from such tragedy.
The book had a few redeeming points, but the bragging of their accomplishments; possessions; and position overshadowed them.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Jami
  • VICTOR, NY, United States
  • 01-21-14

Difficult Topic

I liked this short memoir about the death of the author's daughter and the new family that they created. It reminded me a bit of how my dad, sister and I ended up living together after my mother died - it was a different type of arrangement for us, but it worked. I liked seeing how this family came together and altered their living arrangements to create a new family unit. I listened to the audible version; the author read the book, which I thought was quite fitting. Many people don't like when the authors read their books and some authors should never read their books. But in this case, it worked; after all, it is his story to tell.