We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
Everybody Behaves Badly Audiobook

Everybody Behaves Badly: The True Story Behind Hemingway's Masterpiece The Sun Also Rises

Regular Price:$27.99
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

The making of Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, the outsize personalities who inspired it, and the vast changes it wrought on the literary world.

In the summer of 1925, Ernest Hemingway and a clique of raucous companions traveled to Pamplona, Spain, for the town's infamous running of the bulls. Then, over the next six weeks, he channeled that trip's maelstrom of drunken brawls, sexual rivalry, midnight betrayals, and midday hangovers into his groundbreaking novel The Sun Also Rises. This revolutionary work redefined modern literature as much as it did his peers, who would forever after be called the Lost Generation.

But the full story of Hemingway's legendary rise has remained untold until now. Lesley Blume resurrects the explosive, restless landscape of 1920s Paris and Spain and reveals how Hemingway helped create his own legend. He made himself into a death-courting, bull-fighting aficionado; a hard-drinking, short-fused literary genius; and an expatriate bon vivant. Blume's vivid account reveals the inner circle of the Lost Generation as we have never seen it before and shows how it still influences what we read and how we think about youth, sex, love, and excess.

©2016 Lesley M. M. Blume (P)2016 Recorded Books

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.1 (346 )
5 star
 (146)
4 star
 (118)
3 star
 (59)
2 star
 (13)
1 star
 (10)
Overall
4.1 (311 )
5 star
 (135)
4 star
 (108)
3 star
 (47)
2 star
 (13)
1 star
 (8)
Story
4.3 (310 )
5 star
 (162)
4 star
 (105)
3 star
 (33)
2 star
 (6)
1 star
 (4)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Michael Scanlon Brooklyn, NY 07-04-16
    Michael Scanlon Brooklyn, NY 07-04-16 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
    19
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent Book"

    I read this book alternately with The Sun Also Rises and A Moveable Feast. A great fill of Hemingway.
    This book particularly well read by Jonathan Davis.

    19 of 20 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeno B Iowa 09-16-16
    Jeno B Iowa 09-16-16 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    63
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    20
    5
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great Author, Terrible Friend"

    I loved it and thought it was well-written and narrated. A big bonus for me was the historical background of the time. Like many young and I'll-informed young men, I admired Hemmingway for both his writing and his life. Now, it's clear to me that he was a troubled soul and a terrible friend. This is a great book and a cautionary tale about the pursuit of fame. Collateral damage indeed abounded when the "sun sat" on this book.

    34 of 37 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jennifer Beving 07-15-16 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    20
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A great guide & insight to his writing"

    I'm a fan of Hemingway & listened to this as I simultaneously read The Sun Also Rises. It's a great guide to the process that Hem went through in achieving his literary goals & his penchant for using friends as fodder.

    I enjoyed the narrator & the pacing. If you enjoy Hemingway you're likely to find this entertaining & informative.

    20 of 22 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Leslie B Kazon NEW YORK, NY, US 08-04-16
    Leslie B Kazon NEW YORK, NY, US 08-04-16
    HELPFUL VOTES
    15
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent"

    Vividly evokes the period and characters, engrossing story. Book may be better heard than read.

    15 of 17 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dubi New York, NY 07-17-17
    Dubi New York, NY 07-17-17
    HELPFUL VOTES
    942
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    309
    308
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    36
    3
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "But None So Badly as Hemingway"

    Let me get this out of the way right up top: I never liked Hemingway and, at my age, I'm sure I never will. I'm not even going to qualify that statement with a "despite his talent" or "despite his revolutionary literary innovations" because I don't believe he deserves it. Am I minority of one? No doubt.

    But despite that, I declare that Everybody Behaves Badly is a great book. Better, in my own minority opinion, than the book it is about, The Sun Also Rises, by far. Well, why wouldn't I love it? It shows Hemingway for who he really was: a cruel, manipulating, backstabbing bully -- and, to go along with his Iceberg theory of literature, those four adjectives and nouns are just the tip of the iceberg. The guy was a grade A D-bag, A-hole, son of a B. If you don't believe me, listen to this book.

    Lesley Blume clearly venerates The Sun Also Rises and unabashedly lionizes Hemingway's writing. But she pulls no punches in her depiction of Hemingway: pre-Sun, sycophantically taking all he can from his mentors and supporters only to ditch them and diss them at the first opportunity (and take credit for their literary innovations); and during the real-life episode that inspired Sun, his rampant insecurity fuelling his petulant bullying of his companions; and especially post-Sun, the shameless self-promoter trading on other people's misery, no matter how harmful to them that may be.

    Listening to Blume's detailed account, I wonder if we ever would have heard of The Sun Also Rises or of Hemingway if not for his feckless manipulation, self-promotion, and sociopathic disloyalty. This book certainly bolsters every negative opinion I've ever had about him and his work. But I suspect Hemingway fans will feel exactly the opposite, and that may be the strongest virtue of Everybody Behaves Badly.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Scott Moss Beach, CA, United States 06-03-17
    Scott Moss Beach, CA, United States 06-03-17 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
    255
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    489
    92
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    18
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "The Birth of a Cult"

    Lesley Blume overstates Hemingway’s influence on other writers and literature in general, implying that the publication of The Sun Also Rises changed literature forever. What nonsense. Hemingway was certainly an original stylist, but few of his contemporaries attempted to adopt a similar style. Blume also lauds his “spare, athletic prose.” I don’t know who first coined that term, but it’s repeated far too often. What the hell is “athletic” about prose? And she gushes that he was the best writer of dialogue of his generation, ignoring such luminaries as John O’Hara and Dashiell Hammett among many, many others. What comes across in these pages is that Hemingway was charismatic, arrogant, and an insufferable egotist, who inexplicably had influential supporters waiting breathlessly for his first novel well before it was written. He was a consummate publicity hound who was at least as adept at cultivating a persona as he was at writing. He wrote some fine books, but this biography would have been better served if Blume admired her subject a little less.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    R. Wesson Highlands Ranch, CO USA 11-01-16
    R. Wesson Highlands Ranch, CO USA 11-01-16 Member Since 2001
    HELPFUL VOTES
    13
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    210
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A unique view into the creation of a classic"

    Blume does a fantastic job of painting the portrait of the characters in The Son Also Rises, as juxtaposed against their historical counterparts. Whether it was journalism or fiction seems to be less important than the interesting lives of those behind this important work of fiction.

    11 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stewart Gooderman San Francisco, CA 07-25-16
    Stewart Gooderman San Francisco, CA 07-25-16 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
    148
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    38
    24
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting Background Material"

    Lesley Blume does a fine narrative about Hemingway's life that lead to his writing his first great work, "The Sun Also Rises" as well as its effect on Hemingway's future life and the people he interacted with during this period. Happily the Epilogue goes into some detail on the people upon whom Hemingway based his characters, many years after the book was released in 1926. For people who have read various materials on Hemingway's life, there may not be much that is new here. Yet, Blume presents Hemingway straightforwardly, warts and all.
    I think the narrative could have been condensed somewhat, but this may be the fault of the narration by Jonathan Davis, who is inconsistent in his reading speed. Sometimes his pace is so slow, I got very close to double-timing the playback.

    18 of 25 people found this review helpful
  •  
    K. Cunningham Panama, Central America 03-14-17
    K. Cunningham Panama, Central America 03-14-17 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
    47
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    690
    37
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "I love this one!"

    How fascinating to hear about the world and relationships of Hemingway, and the path of an author in those times. I totally enjoyed the look into this world and now I can't wait to read The Sun Also Rises.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Craig 03-11-17
    Craig 03-11-17 Member Since 2017
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    6
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Amazing Research...A fresh look at Hemingway!"

    Incredible insight into the lives of the people portrayed in THE SUN. From the earliest beginnings to thoughtful retrospectives, this book provides the reader with a clear understanding of the monumental impact of Hemingway's first novel...upon 20th century literature...upon the social conversation of the western world...upon the collective mind of modern readers...and upon those portrayed within the novel. A GREAT read if you love the literary process. A MUST read if you love all things Hemingway!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.