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Publisher's Summary

Being Dad deals with the way fathers, and the subject of fatherhood, are treated in modern culture. Dr. Keith brings his experience with family, students, great mentors, and friends to bear on this subject, which is crying out for attention. Equally, he brings his Christian faith and a scholarly eye for detail along on the journey and works with the listener to navigate a path to a better country where the Father blesses his children and is honored.

©2015 Scott Leonard Keith (P)2016 NRP Books

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amazing

Every dad or future dad should read this book. It was great. I highly recommend it.

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  • Stephen Callaghan
  • 08-20-18

Useful in parts but very Lutheran

As a Roman Catholic seeking a good resource upon becoming a new father, I turned to this book for inspiration. Whilst I agreed with most of it and was moved by some of the stories, I could not escape the fact that the author is a scholar of Reformation theology and comes back to Lutheran ideas over and over again. The analysis of the Prodigal Son parable points out the uselessness of the son's confession but the author himself has included material of a confessional nature in the book. That said, he does quote from Catholic thinkers, GK Chesterton and Saint Thomas Aquinas on a regular basis. I found some of the anecdotal examples of good fathering were based upon financial or material aid given by dads and I think many people would have difficulty relating to this depending on their own financial restraints. That said, there are many good points in this book that will inspire. Readers should just know where the author's faith perspective comes from.