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Publisher's Summary

Lawrence Weschler sets Oliver Sacks' brilliant table talk and extravagant personality in vivid relief, casting himself as a beanpole Sancho to Sacks' capacious Quixote. We see Sacks rowing and ranting and caring deeply; composing the essays that would form The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat; recalling his turbulent drug-fueled younger days; helping his patients and exhausting his friends; and waging intellectual war against a medical and scientific establishment that failed to address his greatest concern: the spontaneous specificity of the individual human soul. And all the while he is pouring out a stream of glorious, ribald, hilarious, and often profound conversation that establishes him as one of the great talkers of the age.

Here is the definitive portrait of Sacks as our preeminent romantic scientist, a self-described "clinical ontologist" whose entire practice revolved around the single fundamental question he effectively asked each of his patients: How are you? Which is to say, how do you be?

A question which Weschler, with this audiobook, turns back on the good doctor himself.

©2019 Lawrence Weschler (P)2019 Tantor

What listeners say about And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?

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  • 10-19-19

Excellent and Exceptional

Oliver Sacks was an extraordinary human. This book is a beautifully honest, thoughtful work written with loving care and fascinating details-both good and bad bits-of a complicated man and his complicated patients.

2 people found this helpful

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Abridged version please

I have enjoyed all of the Weschler books and essays I have read previously. This book lacked the aha moment of discovery that he often provides and seems to be more about a complete reckoning of 30 years of interviews and notes. It exhausted me. Indeed!

1 person found this helpful

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Avoid audible version

While this may be a great book, it is extremely difficult to listen to in the audible version. Between the author’s narrative, interviewing various characters and then narrating Sacks information all at once made me very confused. I imagine the written version would be easier to follow.

1 person found this helpful

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Great story but hardly any women

I read this biography because I have followed Oliver Sacks’ work for years. Lawrence Weschler wrote an engaging memoir. Very well researched. Worth reading. Sad that so few women or people of color are part of the story. There are a few health care workers or assistants who go by first names only and play very minor roles. Weschler’s daughter, Sacks’ god daughter, appears by first name only as well. Not surprisingly, Sacks’ mother, an accomplished surgeon , plays a sinister role. I guess women didn’t matter much to Oliver Sacks or to Weschler. That changed my opinion of both men. Very dispiriting to women. Audible please stop using narrators who lampoon women’s voices. Ghastly! We don’t sound like that except to bigoted men.

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Buying physical book

Jon Davis does it a disservice. But he’s probably a kind man! Is this 15