adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $17.49

Buy for $17.49

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a transracial adoptee. But as Nicole grew up - facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn't see, finding her identity as an Asian American and as a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from - she wondered if the story she'd been told was the whole truth.

With the same warmth, candor, and startling insight that has made her a beloved voice, Nicole Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child. All You Can Ever Know is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets - vital for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong.

©2018 Nicole Chung (P)2018 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

Critic Reviews

"[Narrator Janet] Song's narration is sensitive as she delivers details of subtle discrimination against Chung and her nagging questions about her biological parents.... Listeners are immersed in an emotional journey of one woman's discovery of her past as she begins her own family. This contemporary exploration of identity will resonate with many listeners." (AudioFile)

What listeners say about All You Can Ever Know

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    169
  • 4 Stars
    94
  • 3 Stars
    73
  • 2 Stars
    10
  • 1 Stars
    9
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    149
  • 4 Stars
    78
  • 3 Stars
    59
  • 2 Stars
    16
  • 1 Stars
    18
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    157
  • 4 Stars
    92
  • 3 Stars
    49
  • 2 Stars
    13
  • 1 Stars
    8

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • T
  • 10-09-18

Excellent writing, interesting memoir, however

As an adoptee and adoptive parent I really enjoyed this book but the narrater is horrible, her voice is set at a odd flat tone and it sounds like she had water in her mouth while talking. I genuinely winced though the last chapters because I desperately wanted to hear the conclusion.The heavy handed vocals brought the storyline into a really overwrought place that the actual text did not seem to match. Basically someone else should do the audio and this would be a 5/5 stars all the way.

10 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Disappointed

As an adopted child myself I was looking forward to this book, but I'm really disappointed. It's a thin story and it's repetitive, but worst of all is the narrator. What an annoying voice for an audio book! I'm returning this one for sure.

11 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Interesting but

This was an interesting story, but a real downer. In the end, the author seemed happiest about finding a sister, but everything else about her life as an adopted child - from the perspective of not only her adopted parents but also her biological parents - she seemed to find wanting. If I were a prospective adoptive parent, I think reading this story would give me pause, especially if the adoption was to be transracial.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great for other Korean adoptees

I have never thought about my birth parents, as I am one of the older adoptees from Korea, brought over by Holt (now Holt International), and knew i probably wasn’t registered in as an orphan but more likely, left somewhere my birth mother hoped I would be found. It wasn’t until the big DNA match tests started up that got me started thinking about the possibility of finding distant relatives. And also, the death of my adoptive parents a few years back. Although I know they wouldn’t have minded me wanting to know, they had bern forthright with the possibility being slim to none, so I never grew up thinking that someday I would find them.

This book voices many things I have thought and vaguely wondered about but never said aloud... not out of fear, recrimination from my adoptive parents, but more as a waste of my time to go down that path. I have had the opportunity to meet with other KAs (Korean adoptees) to learn their stories which has been eye-opening to say the least. I just assumed everyone had been adopted into wonderful Christian homes as I was. Sad to say, it wasn’t but hopefully many are pushing past their imperfect childhoods and creating a better future for themselves.

It is a great read from an adoptee’s perspective, possibly helpful for new parents considering international adoptions.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

interesting look at one person's adoption story

im adopted so thought this would be interesting. i think it emphasizes how different each person's experience is. she never explains why she now uses Chung as her last name, despite her marriage, her adoption, everything. as an adoptee, i can't imagine hurting my adoptive parents like that. she never really talks about any struggle with her parents so it confuses me as to why she'd want to reject this part of them. she has such anger towards her birth mother but yet she's never really spoken to her, given her a chance to explain or apologize. she also doesn't talk about her sister Jessica much. my story is so different, yet there are shadows of similarity: trying to fit in, in a white world, trying to develop a sense of self, dealing with racism, wondering what your relatives look like. but her absolute need to feel like she wasn't rejected, that her parents shouldn't have wanted to give her up, is foreign to me. or was always fine to me.. i'd found a great family, so it didn't matter if my birth family didn't want me. i guess if i felt more rejected by my adoptive family, there might have been that, but that was not the case. the absolute hope that she could connect to her sister was interesting as well. all those pulls. just not my experience. an interesting read, none the less.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

A bit preachy for my taste...

Interesting and informative but the angst and hand-wringing made it read more like a therapy session than a book. The last chapter went on and on with little new to add as a summary. Important topic and good case study but not a great book. Performance sounded too girlish for an adult narrator.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

All you could ever know

A nice story about cultural identity. A little bland. But I guess that's real life!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A great adoption memoir

Articulated many feelings and experiences that I have had as an adult interracial adoptee. Highly recommend for adoptees and adoptive parents and anyone interested in a good story.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Beautiful story!

I really enjoyed the book, not understanding in the beginning where it would go. It's twisted and turn into a beautiful story of growth and change.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Poorly written

Chung is not a good writer. She needed a better editor. This is a great topic waiting for a more nuanced and less self-centered treatment.

3 people found this helpful