Your audiobook is waiting…

Afternoons with the Blinds Drawn

Narrated by: Brett Anderson
Length: 5 hrs and 24 mins
5 out of 5 stars (6 ratings)

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

The trajectory of Suede - hailed in infancy as both 'The Best New Band in Britain' and 'effete southern wankers' - is recalled with moving candour by its frontman Brett Anderson, whose vivid memoir swings seamlessly between the tender, witty, turbulent, euphoric and bittersweet.     

Suede began by treading the familiar jobbing route of London's emerging new 1990s indie bands - gigs at ULU, the Camden Powerhaus and the Old Trout in Windsor - and the dispiriting experience of playing a set to an audience of one. But in these halcyon days, their potential was undeniable. Anderson's creative partnership with guitarist Bernard Butler exposed a unique and brilliant hybrid of lyric and sound; together they were a luminescent team - burning brightly and creating some of the era's most revered songs and albums. 

In Afternoons with the Blinds Drawn, Anderson unflinchingly explores his relationship with addiction, heartfelt in the regret that early musical bonds were severed, and clear-eyed on his youthful persona.  

'As a young man...I oscillated between morbid self-reflection and vainglorious narcissism', he states. His honesty, sharply self-aware and articulate tone makes this a compelling autobiography and a brilliant insight into one of the most significant bands of the last quarter century.

©2019 Brett Anderson (P)2019 Hachette Audio UK

Critic Reviews

"A compelling personal account of the dramas of a singular British band." (Neil Tennant)

More from the same

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fantastic

Afternoon With the Blinds Drawn is sublime and every bit as great as Coal Black Mornings, which I did not think would be possible. Highly recommended.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Jacqueline Gilmore
  • Jacqueline Gilmore
  • 10-20-19

how many "dear friends" you say?

My husband and I really enjoyed this 2nd memoir from Brett. i couldn't agree more that as dear a friend Tony Hoffer is to me as well, he was the WRONG producer to work with Suede at a pivotal time in their realising it was time for Suede to stop for awhile. To exit out on creative confusion and no one to shine a light on it.

Brett is a great story teller!! He often reminds me of the character in The Young Poisoners Handbook sometimes. Forever waiting for the dream of his diamond to save him from himself.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for R. O. T. Pink
  • R. O. T. Pink
  • 10-15-19

Nostalgic, honest and perceptive

Brett Anderson’s second memoir is great for Suede fans but also a fascinating listen concerning late 20th and early 21st century music in general. He is frank about what he sees as his and the Suede’s failings and also insightful about the good moments. He provides his perspective on the role of the press and the way in which some bands find success and others are sucked away into obscurity, as well as on musical and literary influences. He refers to his desire to avoid the standard good time party filled Rock’n’roll biographies and write a more personal thoughtful account. He has achieved his goal.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for S Tickner
  • S Tickner
  • 10-13-19

Everything I needed

From 1992 I've craved this level of detail and the background to the beautiful thing that is Suede. Brett delivers it with an honesty and candour that is moving (esp towards the end). It's Suede's journey but it also parallels my own as a fan over those years.
I loved the descriptions of how albums, singles and b sides all evolved from seedling ideas into the epic fully formed and (mostly) wonderful end products. All of it fascinating. All of it entertaining. Some of it funny. Some of it tragic.
It ticked every box for me, as a fan. I pray that pt3 will follow. I'm now off to go through the back catalogue once more.
Any criticisms? Does Brett overdo the adjective/adverb count sometimes?.... Possibly. Does he read it slightly too fast? Easily resolved by turning speed down to 0.9 for the audiobook.
Summary: It's a blissful gem of a book if you've loved Suede like I have

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Fantasy Demon
  • Fantasy Demon
  • 10-12-19

Essential Listening

This is a wonderful and insightful follow-up to Coal Black Mornings and Brett continues with the same exquisite prose style in this second volume of his life so far. As with his previous book this left me yearning for more and I hope to see the years 2004-present covered at some point as I would love to know the story behind his reconnection with Bernard Butler for The Tears ; Brett's solo works and of course his triumphant return with Suede. It's easy to see why each album they have released since 2013 surpasses the last given Brett's gift for self-reflection and desire for self-improvement laid bare in this book. One winces to think about how differently things could have gone for Brett in the late 90s - there is no glamorisation of drug use here like in so many 'Rock God' bios. Third volume please!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for BJD
  • BJD
  • 10-12-19

Great book- well written and beautifully read

Yes, there are too many adjectives. And yes, there are one or two overly florid passages. On the whole, though, this book is remarkable for its warmth, it’s intimacy and it’s directness. Some really insightful moments too, on such things as how musical influences act on a band, the changing place of the press’s importance in pop music, and why the music scene is currently so sterile. Utterly, utterly recommended. Loved it.