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  • Summary

  • 100:1 The Crack Legacy investigates the war on crack in the mid-1980s and the devastation left in its wake. Host Christopher Johnson shares the experiences of the men and women who were on the frontlines - narcotics cops, ex- dealers, artists, community activists - to help explain the rise in incarceration, hyper-aggressive policing, and police shootings of unarmed people of color that we are experiencing now.

    When you add 100:1 The Crack Legacy to your library you will receive all 6 episodes, each with a runtime of approximately 40 minutes.

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Episodes
3 of 6 episodes
  • Ep. 6: 37th & 8th

    Oct 26, 2017

    [Contains explicit content] The “war on crack” is over, but the legacy of that battle is alive today – especially in police departments around the country. In this episode, we look at how changes in police practices and attitudes reaching back at least three decades are still shaping the way cops behave, especially towards black Americans. And we explore police behavior as an extension of a larger understanding of blacks as inherently criminal - and the future of that understanding under President Donald Trump.

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    26 mins
  • Ep. 5: 500 Names

    Oct 26, 2017
    [Contains explicit content] Decades ago, you sent hundreds of people to prison. And to this day, you know a lot of those sentences weren’t fair. How do you make things right? As a federal judge in the mid-90s, Nancy Gertner’s hands were tied by laws that forced her to come down severely against drug offenses – especially when crack cocaine was involved. We often think of judges as all-powerful in their courts. But in this episode, we look at how anti-crack laws forced judges to consider cold sentencing formulas, instead of human beings. Today, Gertner is finding ways to undo some of that damage.
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    24 mins
  • Ep. 4: Inmate #06831-424

    Oct 26, 2017
    [Contains explicit content] Close your eyes and think “crack dealer.” Who do you see? How about a chubby big brother from the Chicago projects, who played high school football and made sure everyone did their homework before bed? Eric Wilson had a mantra: protect the family. So, when the jobs weren’t coming and his mom’s drug problem got in the way, Eric did what he had to do. He sold crack cocaine. Thanks to the harsh drug provision that became known as “100 to 1,” Eric Wilson, Inmate #06831-424, got the kind of brutal prison sentence no one on his side could have imagined.
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    30 mins

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100: THE CRACK LEGACY

Very informativve. Well documented. A story 'of Color' as they say. But while Color is a term meant as a Racial slur, I see it as a fitting and aptly descriptive term for all people. Drugs don't affect people of one color differently than they do people of a different color. Drugs have a devastatingly affect on people all colors. We need to get our collective head out of our backside and approach the drug problem, our national drug problem, seriously. Great series! KUDOS, Audible!

1 person found this helpful

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wish it were longer

liked it. thank you for the historical and modern perspective. I wish a few more cases were included

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super eye opening

It's messed up when you look at folks who are forced into a helpless cycle just because the nation discriminates subliminally on the basis of color. Sometimes I'm proud of the USA, but this is not one of those times.

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just listening to the lies..

tell it how it really went..point blank.. good history lesson though. back to my headadphones.

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Politically charged from the beginning. agenda was overbearing.

Politically charged from the beginning. agenda was overbearing. Very Very biased. Was looking for enlightenment and found this instead. Lets move forward away from the conspiracy theories.

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sucks

so it will download but it will not play. and then you can't delete it.

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Zero Remorse

I couldn’t continue with this stuff. Trying to make POS people into victims. I’m sorry, but I am not going to support anyone that does drugs or violence. Drug laws too stiff? Don’t do drugs! Don’t be a POS! Don’t do the crime if you can’t do the time!