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Rolf the Ruf

Bear, DE, United States
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  • 15
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  • 52
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  • The Black Prism

  • By: Brent Weeks
  • Narrated by: Cristofer Jean
  • Length: 22 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,418
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2,109
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,117

Gavin Guile is the Prism, the most powerful man in the world. He is high priest and emperor, a man whose power, wit, and charm are all that preserves a tenuous peace. But Prisms never last, and Guile knows exactly how long he has left to live: Five years to achieve five impossible goals. But when Guile discovers he has a son, born in a far kingdom after the war that put him in power, he must decide how much he's willing to pay to protect a secret that could tear his world apart.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Big fan of Brent Weeks but...

  • By Lee on 04-20-11

Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-15

I hate jumping on the bandwagon here. When I see a lot of similar reviews focusing on one particular issue, I usually try to find something else to focus on. But in this case, I just can't. I found the world and the concepts introduced to be compelling and I wanted to appreciate the characters as well, because I liked how the politics was lining up and could see some clearly excellent potential for intrigue and interesting twists. However, the narration was just awful and made it very difficult to take the characters seriously.

To be fair, if Weeks has a shortcoming, it is with dialog. Some of it was dressed with modern colloquialisms that actually added to the illusion that the whole thing was a Ridgemont High School play cast with Valley Girls and Surfer Dudes. At one point, the patriarch (Gavin's father), who is supposed to be a brooding Tywin Lannister type, actually says something like, "That is so not a good thing to do." Combined with the narrator's disturbing voicing, I couldn't get this picture of Keanu Reeves aping Darth Vadar out of my head!

I really wish I had just bought the hardcopy because I fear what might have been a great series will now always be tainted for me. I do not recommend this audio book, in spite of what may be an excellent story.

  • Malice

  • The Faithful and the Fallen, Book 1
  • By: John Gwynne
  • Narrated by: John Keating
  • Length: 25 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 481
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 447
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 449

In this epic fantasy debut (perfect for fans of George R. R. Martin), John Gwynne takes listeners to The Banished Lands - a broken world with a violent past. Corban wants nothing more than to be a warrior under King Brenin's rule - to protect and serve. But that day will come all too soon. And the price he pays will be in blood.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • When will the rest of the books be on Audible?!?

  • By Michelle on 10-23-17

Best new author since Michael J. Sulivan

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-14

This was a great find. Not since I stumbled upon Michael J Sulivan's roguish characters Hadrian and Royce have I enjoyed a new novel so. Make no mistake, this is not exactly a similar journey. But it has a few things in common: An intriguing plot, great character development and edge-of-your-seat action! I truly enjoyed it and highly recommend it to all lovers of epic fantasy. Can't wait for the next one!

John Keating's narration may have missed a proper inflection here and there, but overall I enjoyed the amusing array of Scots, Irish and low English brogues he utilized to distinguished the characters.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • The Final Empire

  • Mistborn Book 1
  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 24 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,944
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,136
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,150

For a thousand years the ash fell and no flowers bloomed. For a thousand years the Skaa slaved in misery and lived in fear. For a thousand years the Lord Ruler, the "Sliver of Infinity," reigned with absolute power and ultimate terror, divinely invincible. Then, when hope was so long lost that not even its memory remained, a terribly scarred, heart-broken half-Skaa rediscovered it in the depths of the Lord Ruler's most hellish prison.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A GREAT TRILOGY!!!

  • By Don Gilbert on 11-12-09

Amazing Trilogy! Should become a classic!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-31-13

This review looks at all three books of the trilogy as a whole. What a magnificent work! I first became aware of Brandon Sanderson while reading the Wheel of Time series. Sanderson wrote the last three books of that 14 book saga, completing the work begun by Robert Jordan. I felt he did an admirable job finishing what Jordan had begun and was interested in reading some of his own books. I started with Elantris, which is a stand-alone novel, and enjoyed that. I followed that with the Mistborn trilogy and quickly realized that this author is an amazing standout in the field of fantasy literature.

Mistborn draws you into a strange dying world in which the inhabitants struggle to survive without really comprehending the true nature of their world. The main cast of characters represent a variety of gifted, and in some cases more enlightened, individuals who embark on an endeavor that promises to reveal the hidden realities of the powers that shape and move their world if it does not kill them first.

Sanderson's vision for this series is both creative and unique. It shares many elements of classic fantasy, while standing apart and making its own rules. There are aspects of it that draw closer to science fiction and the whole thing is so internally consistent that it makes for an incredibly satisfying conclusion.

This series is unlike many trilogies, where the middle, or bridge, book tends to be the best of the three (I am reminded of Star Wars and Lord of the Rings). Instead it makes a strong start in book 1, drawing you into a mysterious world and unfolding a grand adventure that can almost stand alone. But in the aftermath, you realize that this was only the beginning. Book 2 drags a bit as you become more and more aware of the true nature of things. The need to reveal so much information makes for a somewhat less thrilling volume, but necessary to set up the final book. And it is well worth it because book 3 proves the best as it culminates in a magnificent conclusion. Highly recommended!



  • Theft of Swords

  • Riyria Revelations, Volume 1
  • By: Michael J. Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 22 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,018
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,691
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,671

Acclaimed author Michael J. Sullivan created instant best sellers with his spellbinding Riyria Revelations series. This first volume introduces Royce Melborn and Hadrian Blackwater, two enterprising thieves who end up running for their lives when they’re framed for the death of the king. Trapped in a conspiracy bigger than they can imagine, their only hope is unraveling an ancient mystery - before it’s too late.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • And I didn't think I liked fantasies...

  • By AudioAddict on 09-27-13

What a great find!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-13

I've been searching for some exciting new blood in the fantasy genre, and I feel like I may have just found it in Michael J. Sullivan. Having just finished the massively epic Wheel of Time series and waiting endlessly for the next G.R.R. Martin novel, I was getting desperate for something to slake my insatiable appetite for this genre, Theft of Swords really filled the void. It is a completely different style from either of the aforementioned series, but completely engrossing in its own right. Hadrian and Royce are a roguish pair in the tradition of Butch and Sundance, Holmes and Watson, Nate and Hayes and many another dynamic duo. The plot seems deceptively shallow at first but quickly develops into a complex conspiracy with more layers than initially meets the eye. The magic and mythology of this world are subdued and only hinted at until we are confronted with it in sparing doses. This aspect puts me in mind of Martin's Ice and Fire series which handles the supernatural in much the same way. I have already added the remaining books of the trilogy to my library and have just started on book two with high hopes for another exciting series to satisfy my fantasy itch.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Memory of Light

  • Wheel of Time, Book 14
  • By: Robert Jordan, Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer, Kate Reading
  • Length: 41 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 17,189
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 15,672
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 15,689

Since 1990, when Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time® burst on the world with its first book, The Eye of the World, listeners have been anticipating the final scenes of this extraordinary saga, which has sold over 40 million copies in over 32 languages. When Robert Jordan died in 2007, all feared that these concluding scenes would never be written. But working from notes and partials left by Jordan, established fantasy writer Brandon Sanderson stepped in to complete the masterwork.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • End of one of my favorite fantasy series ever.

  • By Magikarp Salad on 06-02-13

WOW! Okay, now I'm bummed...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-13

I've had the pleasure of listening to all 14 books of this colossal series one after the other from start to finish with very little lag time between books. Unlike many long-time fans, I came late to the party, starting the first book just last summer. So I did not have to wait years for the conclusion. Taking it all in like this became so addictive that I think there may be a hole in my life now that it's all done. Hence, the second phrase of the title of my review.

This finale was incredibly intense. I would even describe it as exhausting. The final battle begins as the book opens and we are treated to one massive battle from beginning to end, scattered over multiple fronts. The forces of the Light are held teetering on the bring of complete failure and destruction, balancing on the edge of a knife everywhere at once. Unlike most novels, there is simply no downtime -- no breaks in the action. It is all taut suspense from start to finish. Hence the first phrase of the title of my review. I had to force myself to come up for air from time to time.

There were so many plot threads wrapped up in this final book that I feel like I need to go back to listen to the whole series again to make sure it was all concluded properly without cheating. Kudos to Sanderson for getting it all accomplished in what I felt was both a satisfactory and largely satisfying fashion. On the positive side, I was kept guessing and a number of my assumptions did not pan out as I expected. On the negative side, I was left feeling that some of the plot lines were resolved in a somewhat contrived manner. Nevertheless, the overall effect was satisfying. I was left wondering about some of methods by which certain results were achieved. In a series where every rule of the One Power and arcane implements employed was painstakingly explained, I found a few new concepts here that were barely explained at all. They just happened and I was left thinking, "Wow, okay, didn't know he or she could do that, but I guess that works."

As some other reviewers have opined, I was left wanting some more aftermath resolution. But I can't complain too much about this as it seems it's really just a side-effect of that fact that it is all over now and I'm left wishing it wasn't. So I guess this is really an indication of just how much I have enjoyed the series. My opinion of this series has only grown over the course of it and now that it is done, I would have to rank it among the best that fantasy has to offer. If you are someone who enjoys long, richly developed epics and never wants them to end, you can not do better than this series which will keep you fully invested for many, many hours and not leave you dissatisfied when it finally concludes.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Eye of the World

  • Book One of The Wheel of Time
  • By: Robert Jordan
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading, Michael Kramer
  • Length: 29 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,964
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,733
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,763

When their village is attacked by trollocs, monsters thought to be only legends, three young men, Rand, Matt, and Perrin, flee in the company of the Lady Moiraine, a sinister visitor of unsuspected powers. Thus begins an epic adventure set in a world of wonders and horror, where what was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Your first step down a very long and winding road.

  • By Lore on 06-29-12

Pleasant surprise for an old Tolkien fan...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-11

I have been a fan of Tolkien, Martin's Ice and Fire Chronicles and many another "serious" fantasy epic. For many years I steadfastly avoided reading the Wheel of Time series because I labored under the mistaken premise that any series that contained more than three or four books must be mass-produced pulp fiction crap. Finally a friend convinced me to give it a try. I am now on book four and enjoying it all very much. I am not going to tell you that Robert Jordan has replaced Tolkien or even George R. R. Martin in my esteem, but I will say that to dismiss this series as unworthy is a big mistake. I have enjoyed the character development and the world and cultural concepts of Jordan's Wheel of Time and will probably now stay with it to the end. Recommended for all fans of classic fantasy.

  • Hyperion

  • By: Dan Simmons
  • Narrated by: Marc Vietor, Allyson Johnson, Kevin Pariseau, and others
  • Length: 20 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,329
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,204
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,255

On the world called Hyperion, beyond the law of the Hegemony of Man, there waits the creature called the Shrike. There are those who worship it. There are those who fear it. And there are those who have vowed to destroy it. In the Valley of the Time Tombs, where huge, brooding structures move backward through time, the Shrike waits for them all.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Shrike Awaits. Enter The Time Tombs...

  • By Michael on 10-13-12

Intriguing throughout, until...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-11

A fascinating story is unfolded for us by a full cast of narrators. I was engrossed and mesmerized. There are a lot of interesting scientific concepts explored here, much of it dealing with time paradoxes. But the conclusion left me feeling cheated and rather annoyed. One of the tools writers use to build complexity, interest and tension is to weave in additional plot threads. The more plot threads, the more interesting the story tends to become, but it also becomes very complex and drawing all of those loose ends to a tidy conclusion is an author's greatest challenge. In Hyperion, Simmons weaves a masterwork of many layers only to leave it all hanging out there without any resolution. Great start, disappointing finish.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful