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Fort Lauderdale, Florida United States
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  • Corpies

  • Super Powereds Spinoff, Book 1
  • By: Drew Hayes
  • Narrated by: Kyle McCarley
  • Length: 19 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 4,096
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,832
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3,829

Titan was one of the nation's most loved and respected Heroes, until an infidelity scandal tore his image and family apart. After decades spent out of the limelight, Owen Daniels has decided to take up the mantle of Titan once again to try and make amends for his years away. Unfortunately, the Titan Scandal is still common knowledge, and no Hero team wants such a polarizing figure.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow, loved it!

  • By Leslie on 08-22-16

Great spinoff of a strong series

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-29-17

The superpowereds series is highly entertaining in its own right but suffers from comparisons to other more well established books about special schools training gifted people i.e. Harry Potter, x-men, vampire academy. Extraordinary adolescents get recruited to a special school to teach them how to use there extraordinary skills, insert outside threat, add a sprinkling of true adolescent experience, magnified for effect and you have a formula book. But taking such a broad view would lead you to miss out in the great series and most likely miss this spinoff entirely. Corpies takes elements of the superpowereds universe and a blink and you'll miss him character from the 2nd book and weaves a spectacular story full of genuine emotion and growth. When starting the book I had preconceived notions about the main character based on his reported actions in the superpowereds books and I can say unreservedly that corpies made me reassess my thoughts. Good stories should do that. If you read comic books this is not an unfamiliar plot, With many familiar beats and characters. But that isn't always bad, I feel in love with these characters and regardless of sheathed I saw titan as a superman analog or gale as a storm analog doesn't negate the fact that the woven texture of the storytelling pulled me in and held me through to the end.
I like long stories with multiple conflicts and drew Hayes knows how to satisfy in that regard. Perhaps because he is a free internet episodic writer self publishing chapters one at a time and adding bonus chapters based on contributions his books are longer than most other writers in the genre which grants a wonderfully vivid tapestry of description and action. He lands in the realm of Robert Jordan in that regard as far as I'm concerned providing great visuals particularly for the audio book reader.
As usual Kyle McCarley is the weak link in these books, being the performer on all superpowereds books so far. His natural nasal voice is difficult to disguise and though he does perform many variations to distinguish characters(a trait will Wheaton should learn) he doesn't posses the range beyond extra nasal for nerds(stereotype), extra deep for tough guys(stereotype), breathy for female, and scratchy for gruff, tuff, or old. And these books have many more than 4 characters. I understand not everyone can be Jim dale but after 3 books of Kyle I can say for certain he should be better than this. That being said I've seen what happens s when for some reason a reader is changed mid series (Rachel Morgan hollows books) and the different pronunciations of names alone was enough to make me crazy. So I'm not advocating Kyle's removal I only point out why the reduction in score for the performance category in my review.
Another great plus if drew hayes' work is that his books are all online and should you need to reference anything while listening you can go to the web and click right to the chapter you want.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Hard Magic

  • Book I of the Grimnoir Chronicles
  • By: Larry Correia
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 16 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,245
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,319
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,316

Jake Sullivan is a licensed private eye with a seriously hardboiled attitude. He also possesses raw magical talent and the ability to make objects in his vicinity light as a feather or as heavy as depleted uranium, all with a magical thought. It's no wonder the G-men turn to Jake when they need someoneto go after a suspected killer who has been knocking off banks in a magic-enhanced crime spree.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not what I thought it was going to be.

  • By Clinton on 08-06-11

Don't be fooled, this is a superhero book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-18-13

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

The book was intriguing enough, however is was very derivative. Anyone familiar with any x-men title will recognize the format and some of the story elements. That being said, after I got over the bait and switch, it was a good read that kept my attention.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Hard Magic?

There is a moment near the beginning of the book where one of the main protagonists must teleport herself away from a group of toughs. She does so bu when she rematerializes she does so in the same space where a bug is flying and the bug is fused into her body. The description of this as well as the aftermath are described in stomach churning detail.

Did Bronson Pinchot do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

Mr Pinchot is a fine character actor but to his credit he is nowhere to be found on this recording. I could not find any sign of his voice which I expected to be able to pick out immediately. As for character, he uses accents, pitch, and variable speed to make each one unique. My only note is that jake, the main character, has such a low pitched voice it is very difficult to hear at points when the recording is at standard volume. If you turn up for jake everyone else gets too loud. I've never heard any narrator use such a low voice, even Jim Dale's Hagrid has an easier to hear voice.

Do you think Hard Magic needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

As is true of all superhero titles the characters lend themselves to multiple adventures.

Any additional comments?

This book is a superhero book. There is no real magic at a all. What they are calling magic is more like cosmic power. I was expecting this book to be something based on the title and other reviews but it turned out to be X-Men in the '30s. Each character has a single "super" ability. Super strength (like Rogue), healing (like Wolverine), teleporting (like night crawler), mind control (like prof X), telekinesis (like Jean Gray), etc all exist and are inborn abilities. There is an uneasy tolerance of these "magical" powers by the normal people, there is a secret group that fights to make that tolerance into acceptance, there is an antagonist who is the oldest of them all and is bent on the idea of the survival of the fittest (apocalypse anyone?). The magic that is shoehorned in to the story seems like a cheap device used to prevent plagiarism charges, and could easily be removed and alter nothing in the narrative. That being said the magical aspects of the story; runic symbols, kanji, spell casting; are some of the most innovative moments in the book. I found myself engrossed in those chapters and wishing for more. Also very entertaining was the insertion of historical events and figures into a world where super abilities exist. How would WWI have gone with platoons of super beings, what would Lincoln have done if faced with the emergence of powers, were Einstein or Tesla super beings similar to Forge? As an original story this book was lacking, as a magic story this book was lacking, but as a heroes journey this book connects. The journey of the two main protagonists is complete from obscurity to hero for one and redemption for the other.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • American Gods: The Tenth Anniversary Edition (A Full Cast Production)

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Ron McLarty, Daniel Oreskes, full cast
  • Length: 19 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42,100
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 39,061
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,025

Locked behind bars for three years, Shadow did his time, quietly waiting for the day when he could return to Eagle Point, Indiana. A man no longer scared of what tomorrow might bring, all he wanted was to be with Laura, the wife he deeply loved, and start a new life. But just days before his release, Laura and Shadow's best friend are killed in an accident. With his life in pieces and nothing to keep him tethered, Shadow accepts a job from a beguiling stranger he meets on the way home, an enigmatic man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 10 Years and Still a Fantastic Read

  • By Nightveil on 07-22-11

Quite a good read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-27-12

What made the experience of listening to American Gods: The Tenth Anniversary Edition (A Full Cast Production) the most enjoyable?

With a full cast it was easy to find the personalities of all the characters and to follow the action.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Whiskey Jack and Horus due to their humor and complete disregard for convention

Which character – as performed by the narrators – was your favorite?

Sam Blackhawk had a necessary youth but worldliness to her a well nuanced performance

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

American Gods: Faith is a Con

Any additional comments?

Neil Gaimon's first novel is a fine work steeped in mythology and twisted history. A circular vision reminiscent of the layered worlds he wrote about in his Sandman Graphic Novels. This novels only draw back is it tries to be something for everyone; a heist story, a buddy road trip, a mystery and an adventure all the while embroiled in obscure mythologies most of us will have to use wikipedia to fully understand. (I suggest you do this as it really illuminates several of the characters.) IF there had been a singular focus I believe the story would have been more compelling. I did laugh that there was a true denouement, an epilogue, a post script and an appendix. It reminded me of the master works of composers such as Beethoven who would write in false cadenzas to their works leading the listener to think the ending was imminent only to have the cadenza end unresolved and flurry into another cadence. American careens to an ending only to find us moving directly into an unexpected and unresolved portion of the narrative and then does it again. A unique structure that is not unwelcome.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Screwtape Letters

  • By: C.S. Lewis
  • Narrated by: Ralph Cosham
  • Length: 3 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,126
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,859
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,880

A masterpiece of satire, this classic has entertained and enlightened readers the world over with its sly and ironic portrayal of human life and foibles from the vantage point of Screwtape, a highly placed assistant to "Our Father Below". At once wildly comic, deadly serious, and strikingly original, C.S. Lewis gives us the correspondence of the worldly-wise old Devil to his nephew, Wormwood, a novice demon in charge of securing the damnation of an ordinary young man.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One to Read Again and Again

  • By E. Pearson on 12-31-11

Not what I expected

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-12

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

A different story

What do you think your next listen will be?

Redshirts

Did Ralph Cosham do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

N/A

What character would you cut from The Screwtape Letters?

N/A

Any additional comments?

I did not enjoy this book. It was preachy and filled with cynicism from the perspective of someone who knows better in the guise of someone proscribing the path to sin C.S. Lewis shows very clearly his low opinion of the vast majority of people. C.S Lewis is well known as a religious author inserting overtly christian themes into his fiction but I was completely unprepared for this book. I have read all the Narnia books and while Aslan's similarities to Jesus are undeniable it never pulls you from the story. Screwtape on the other hand is the exact opposite of a fire and brimstone preacher and as such informs us that every moment of our lives, every action we undertake, that is not focused on god is the proper path to hell... this reverse preaching is tiresome and well... preachy. after 18 letters I had to stop listening. This is more a religion book told from the perspective of the devil than any sort of comedy or fantasy fiction. I can not recommend it.

5 of 9 people found this review helpful