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Jason

Virden, MB Canada
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  • Thick as Thieves

  • By: Peter Spiegelman
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 11 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 31

Ex-CIA Carr is the reluctant leader of an elite crew planning a robbery of such extraordinary proportions that it will leave them set for life. Diamonds, money laundering, and extortion go into a timed-to-the-minute scheme that unfurls across South America, Miami, and Grand Cayman Island. Carr's cohorts are seasoned pros, but they're wound drum-tight - months before, the man who brought them together was killed in what Carr suspects was a setup.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Narration was like torture

  • By Kindle Customer on 10-16-11

Great book, Perfect Narration

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-16

Darker than the Ocean's movies, this heist book is not a playful, high stakes romp. There is a feeling that things can go horribly wrong at any time. The thieves are either at each other's throats or manipulating their partners, and the bad guys (this crew robs criminal organizations) are ruthless. They'll kill the instant something smells fishy. Everything you want in your caper is still there: 2 femme fatales, hair-trigger psycho tough-guys, smarmy villains, but there is the hero, too. He is so well developed and real, fighting family issues while struggling to keep his crew on mission. Deep down, the story is about Carr trying to make sense of his past at the same time as he catches whiffs of an impending trap.

The narrator, William Dufris, knocked my socks off. I'm putting him up there with Scott Brick and Simon Vance, but he's got far more range. Each character was distinct, I could pick them out before the writing tag. Spiegleman indicates almost everyone's accent and Dufris nails it. And he finds this incredible, resonating baritone (or whatever is below that) for the behind-the-scenes money-man.

  • Wool

  • Silo, #1; Wool, #1-5
  • By: Hugh Howey
  • Narrated by: Amanda Sayle
  • Length: 17 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6,429
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5,881
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,907

In a ruined and toxic landscape, a community exists in a giant silo underground, hundreds of stories deep. There, men and women live in a society full of regulations they believe are meant to protect them. Sheriff Holston, who has unwaveringly upheld the silo’s rules for years, unexpectedly breaks the greatest taboo of all: He asks to go outside.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent story, ridiculous narration

  • By virginia on 10-26-14

Compelling and entertaining

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-25-15

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend Wool. Once you meet Jules, it is hard to stop. If you have a knack for predicting what will come next in a story, Wool will blow you away.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Juliet, with Solo a close second. (see the comment on the narrator). Tough, no nonsense, get-er-done protagonist whose life saving asset is the relationships she has built.

What about Amanda Sayle’s performance did you like?

I see a lot of complaints about Amanda's work, but I disagree. First and foremost, she nailed the Juliet character. If I had a handful of auditions, I would pick her for the energy and tone she brought to the lead.Her performance also made me like Solo (what an awesome voice for him), Shirley and Walker.

She caught the candour of the mechanicals. She brought despair and anguish to the desperate fights.I think her overall tone was a great match for the tone of the book

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Adams vs. Jefferson

  • The Tumultuous Election of 1800
  • By: John Ferling
  • Narrated by: Jack Garrett
  • Length: 11 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 243
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 132
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130

Award-winning author John Ferling is a leading authority on the American Revolution. His entertaining and enlightening histories have greatly improved our understanding of early America and the Founding Fathers. Now Ferling opens a window to the past and explores the contentious presidential election of 1800.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding work of interpretive history

  • By D. Littman on 11-01-04

Great overview

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-13

What did you love best about Adams vs. Jefferson?

Incredibly relevant. Watch the original political parties infight and disintegrate. A look into the internal struggles of the Federalists, though Ferling doesn't show the same depth of insight looking at the Republicans. See how a President must fight off enemies while holding off his allies' ambitions. Great elaboration of the Vice and Presidency years you may have seen in the John Adams miniseries

What was one of the most memorable moments of Adams vs. Jefferson?

Adams' standing up to Hamilton's henchmen and seeking peace outside their purview. Did cost him the election, might have saved democracy in America. The politics got really nasty.

Any additional comments?

I reccomend Madison and Jefferson to anyone who wants a much more in-depth look at the subject matter with a better assessment of the Republican's manoeuvres. Wish it was on Audible.

  • A Thousand Lives

  • The Untold Story of Hope, Deception, and Survival at Jonestown
  • By: Julia Scheeres
  • Narrated by: Robin Miles
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,231
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,078
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,080

In A Thousand Lives, the New York Times best-selling memoirist Julia Scheeres traces the fates of five individuals who followed Jim Jones to South America as they struggled to first build their paradise, and then survive it. Each went for different reasons - some were drawn to Jones for his progressive attitudes towards racial equality, others were dazzled by his claims to be a faith healer. But once in Guyana, Jones' drug addiction, mental decay, and sexual depredations quickly eroded the idealistic community.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Experiencing a New Emotion at the End of a Book

  • By Russell on 12-15-11

Compelling

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-11

Would you listen to A Thousand Lives again? Why?

No. The subject is distressing.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Tommy Bogue. The independent spirit that just can't be repressed, terrified or tortured away. Went on to become a positive leader.

Which scene was your favorite?

The airstrip

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The murder of the children. I wanted to put my fist through the car window.

Any additional comments?

I had only seen a 1/2 hr documentary and heard the pop-culture derivations. I had long had an apetite for a deeper look at this descent into madness. This book is a meditation on the gradual corruption of trust to the furthest extreme. I am grateful for the narrator's approach, not trying to 'act' the voices and statements of Jones, but keeping a double narrative distance (female, and unemotive) from a terrible person and subject.

20 of 20 people found this review helpful