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Donald E. Campbell

Pearl, MS USA
  • 46
  • reviews
  • 61
  • helpful votes
  • 94
  • ratings
  • Privacy, Property, and Free Speech: Law and the Constitution in the 21st Century

  • By: Jeffrey Rosen, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Jeffrey Rosen
  • Length: 12 hrs
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 472
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 413
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 413

Although the courts have struggled to balance the interests of individuals, businesses, and law enforcement, the proliferation of intrusive new technologies puts many of our presumed freedoms in legal limbo. For instance, it's not hard to envision a day when websites such as Facebook or Google Maps introduce a feature that allows real-time tracking of anyone you want, based on face-recognition software and ubiquitous live video feeds.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining & thought-provoking. Highly recommend

  • By Joseph on 10-27-13

Very Interesting and Informative

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-16

Any additional comments?

This is a very well done and thought out lecture series. Rosen does an excellent job of not just explaining legal doctrines but also pushing the envelope and asking -- what's the future hold for these issues. Very informative.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Great Expectations

  • By: Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 18 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,927
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,650
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,650

One of the most revered works in English literature, Great Expectations traces the coming of age of a young orphan, Pip, from a boy of shallow aspirations into a man of maturity. From the chilling opening confrontation with an escaped convict to the grand but eerily disheveled estate of bitter old Miss Havisham, all is not what it seems in Dickens’ dark tale of false illusions and thwarted desire.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Performance of a classic!

  • By Steven on 08-18-13

It happens when great writer meets great narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-16

Any additional comments?

There may be people out that that do not like Dickens, but surely there is not anyone out there that cannot appreciate his wonderful use of the English language. They stick with you -- the raising of Pip "by hand" being the first one that stands out in my mind. And even if you are ambivalent about Dickens but appreciate exceptional narration, you get that here as well. Well done.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Isaac's Storm

  • A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History
  • By: Erik Larson
  • Narrated by: Richard Davidson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,545
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,411
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,406

In 1900, Isaac Monroe Cline was in charge of the Galveston station of the US Weather Bureau. He was a knowledgeable, seasoned weatherman who considered himself a scientist. When he heard the deep thudding of waves on Galveston's beach in the early morning of September 8, however, Cline refused to be alarmed. The city had been hit by bad weather before.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A highly detailed account of a catastrophic storm

  • By Norman B. Bernstein on 09-28-15

Good Book but not the best Erik Larson

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-18-16

Any additional comments?

This book is classic Larson. He has an uncanny ability to take story lines moving in different directions and to weave them into a coherent and interesting whole. This gift is on display here. In my mind, however, the story was a little lacking. It feels like the 1900 Galveston Hurricane was something that always interested him so he decided he would write it for himself.

The story has some interesting meteorological history and provides an uninspiring view of bureaucratic politics. If you are not into the scientific stuff it may seem a little slow at times, but hang in there -- the stories of survival and death during the hurricane are gripping. I immediately googled the storm to see what else I could learn (and to see pictures) after I finished.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dust and Shadow

  • An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson
  • By: Lyndsay Faye
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,078
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,608
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,594

Breathless and painstakingly researched, this is a stunning debut mystery in which Sherlock Holmes unmasks Jack the Ripper. Lyndsay Faye perfectly captures all the color and syntax of Conan Doyle’s distinctive nineteenth-century London.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent!

  • By Wadie on 01-07-11

Narrator unbelievable; story very well-written

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-15

Any additional comments?

I really enjoyed this book. The narrator does a wonderful job and makes you feel like you are right there, standing alongside Holmes and Watson. The writing is so meticulous, you have a hard time believing it was not written by Doyle. The story was very interesting -- and plenty of SH deduction to keep you impressed. I thought the ending was a little rushed -- but please do not let that stop you from giving this a listen!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Between You and Me

  • Confessions of Comma Queen
  • By: Mary Norris
  • Narrated by: Mary Norris
  • Length: 8 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 480
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 433
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 430

Between You & Me features Norris' laugh-out-loud descriptions of some of the most common and vexing problems in spelling, punctuation, and usage - comma faults, danglers, "who" vs. "whom", "that" vs. "which", compound words, gender-neutral language - and her clear explanations of how to handle them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fun book for those who love language

  • By Kate M. on 08-21-15

Writing from a different perspective

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-15

Any additional comments?

I really enjoyed this book. It discusses writing from the perspective of an editor. I like the way she weaves in personal stories -- and they do not feel like they are filler or irrelevant. Also, she discusses actual editorial decisions she made, some of which she later regretted. Her discussion of the angst (small) things like the placement of a comma or a hyphen is both informative and funny. And I will have to say, I will never look at a comma the same way again! I actually thought this was a good book for the author to read. Her voice is not a traditional smooth narrator, but it allows her to put emphasis on points that I think I would have missed just reading the words. Also, to me her voice had the tenor of a newsroom. In short, I liked this book and it makes me long for a really good editor!

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Invisible Bridge

  • The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan
  • By: Rick Perlstein
  • Narrated by: David de Vries
  • Length: 39 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 427
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 386
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 383

In January of 1973 Richard Nixon announced the end of the Vietnam War and prepared for a triumphant second term - until televised Watergate hearings revealed his White House as little better than a mafia den. The next president declared upon Nixon’s resignation “our long national nightmare is over” - but then congressional investigators exposed the CIA for assassinating foreign leaders. The collapse of the South Vietnamese government rendered moot the sacrifice of some 58,000 American lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Tad Davis on 10-03-14

History comes alive

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-15

Any additional comments?

Perlstein is unparalleled in his ability to bring context to historical events. A lot of times history is from 30,000 feet. Not here. You feel like you are sitting in the room as Nixon is contemplating resignation, as Carter's peanuts are huffing it around New Hampshire. I really like this style. My criticism has to do with the decision to include what turns out to be a mini-pre-political life biography of Ronald Reagan with strains of psycho-analysis along the lines of "you can see why he is the way he was as a politician by looking at his childhood." I don't buy it and for me it takes away from the underlying story -- the rise of the Reagan star (and the decline of Nixon). So, if you get this and start to get discouraged by the Reagan flashbacks, DON'T STOP LISTENING! They will end and the rest of the story is really engrossing.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Being Human: Life Lessons from the Frontiers of Science

  • By: Robert Sapolsky, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: The Great Courses
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,135
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 999
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 993

Understanding our humanity - the essence of who we are - is one of the deepest mysteries and biggest challenges in modern science. Why do we have bad moods? Why are we capable of having such strange dreams? How can metaphors in our language hold such sway on our actions? As we learn more about the mechanisms of human behavior through evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, and other related fields, we're discovering just how intriguing the human species is.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Human And Loving It!

  • By Gillian on 07-28-15

Some interesting parts -- but not what I thought

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-15

Any additional comments?

I'm not going to say this lecture series does not have some interesting parts -- it does. I particualrly liked the last lecture. But it seems that the title is a little misleading. In fact, the first/introductory lecture leads you to believe that the lecture series is going to be about what makes us human -- in other words what is it about us that distinguishes us from just another species. I didn't get that out of these lectures that seem to be a series of lectures on interesting scientific facts/quirks. The lecturer did a good job -- he was easy to understand and follow.

6 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • The Six Wives of Henry VIII

  • By: Alison Weir
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 22 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,564
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,426
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,413

This acclaimed best seller from popular historian Alison Weir is a fascinating look at the Tudor family dynasty and its most infamous ruler. The Six Wives of Henry VIII brings to life England’s oft-married monarch and the six wildly different but equally fascinating women who married him. Gripping from the first sentence to the last and loaded with fascinating details, Weir’s rich history is a perfect blend of scholarship and entertainment.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Overview AND Sordid Details

  • By Troy on 10-29-13

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-15

This is an extremely well written and well performed book. Can't recommend it enough. Get it

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Elements of Eloquence

  • Secrets of the Perfect Turn of Phrase
  • By: Mark Forsyth
  • Narrated by: Don Hagen
  • Length: 5 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,356
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,231
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,209

In his inimitably entertaining and wonderfully witty style, he takes apart famous phrases and shows how you too can write like Shakespeare or quip like Oscar Wilde. Whether you’re aiming to achieve literary immortality or just hoping to deliver the perfect one-liner, The Elements of Eloquence proves that you don’t need to have anything important to say - you simply need to say it well.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Who knew rhetoric could be so much fun?

  • By Philo on 10-30-14

Just enjoy the listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-15

Any additional comments?

I think some of the negative comments for this book come from those who expect too much from it. It is a light/skim the surface look at the "elements of eloquence" -- You aren't going into the jungle of deep learning here folks. You are just being introduced in a well written (often funny) and light manner.

19 of 20 people found this review helpful

  • Myths, Lies, and Half-Truths of Language Usage

  • By: John McWhorter, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: John McWhorter
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 654
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 591
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 571

Conventional wisdom suggests English is going to the dogs, that bad grammar, slang, and illogical constructions signal a decline in standards of usage - to say nothing of the corruption wrought by email and text messages. But English is a complicated, marvelous language. Far from being a language in decline, English is the product of surprisingly varied linguistic forces, some of which have only recently come to light. And these forces continue to push English in exciting new directions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This course will turn you into a linguistics fan!

  • By Quaker on 11-15-13

Solid Lecture

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-15

Any additional comments?

This was a very solid and enjoyable lecture about the English language. The lecturer did a very good job of conveying the information with a sense of humor.