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Sarah L. Larson

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 23
  • ratings
  • Hunger

  • A Memoir of (My) Body
  • By: Roxane Gay
  • Narrated by: Roxane Gay
  • Length: 5 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,532
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,238
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,221

In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as "wildly undisciplined", Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brutal and raw and honest

  • By S. Yates on 07-17-17

Confusing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-17

I read this book because I wanted to learn more about the author and embrace her story. I respect her and it. But the contradiction in it was so difficult to receive. So so many times throughout, I heard that she is uncomfortable with the attention she receives from her body, yet eats to try to disappear. That she wants to be seen and respected, yet when she’s seen and given attention and spoken to directly, it’s too much. She thinks fit people exist to rub it in her face, yet is angry when she’s treated as if her obesity makes others feel the same way. She prefaces the book with it being a “bare all” diary of sorts, yet multiple times writes “I don’t dare share the details.” She refuses to forgive (her right), yet in turn refuses herself any possible improvement in her recovery that may come with forgiveness. It reads as if so many pathways to her fulfillment are understandable and palpable, but she refuses to pursue them, just because. I, and many many other women and men, have suffered at the hands of others in the same way as her. But becoming who you truly are in the form you want to be requires making the decision, for yourself, to rise above. This book was confusing and frustrating. I wanted to look deeply into Roxanne’s eyes and soak in her story and offer consolation and strength and hug her, but then I’d be pushed away for wanting to do so.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Nest

  • By: Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney
  • Narrated by: Mia Barron
  • Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,270
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,672
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4,663

Every family has its problems. But even among the most troubled, the Plumb family stands out as spectacularly dysfunctional. Years of simmering tensions finally reach a breaking point on an unseasonably cold afternoon in New York City as Melody, Beatrice, and Jack Plumb gather to confront their charismatic and reckless older brother, Leo, freshly released from rehab. Months earlier, an inebriated Leo got behind the wheel of a car with a 19-year-old waitress as his passenger.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't get through it.

  • By E. Bullock on 05-19-16

Don't attempt to read

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-16

I have no idea how this book was published as is. The grammar and sentence structure is an absolute nightmare. I had to finish it on Audible because I was anxious for a good conclusion. I was disappointed.

  • A Man Called Ove

  • By: Fredrik Backman
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 9 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63,868
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58,441
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58,342

Meet Ove. He's a curmudgeon - the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him "the bitter neighbor from hell". But behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Laughed and I Cried

  • By Bill on 08-22-15

My new favorite book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-16

Just an absolute perfect book. Such an incredible writer, and the best narrator I've ever heard. A must!!

  • Racing the Rain

  • A Novel
  • By: John L. Parker Jr.
  • Narrated by: Jim Meskimen
  • Length: 10 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 374
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 342
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 341

Quenton Cassidy's first foot races are with nature itself: the summer storms that sweep through his subtropical neighborhood. Shirtless, barefoot, and brown as a berry, Cassidy is a skinny, mouthy kid with aspirations to be a great athlete. As he explores his primal surroundings along the Loxahatchee River and the nearby Atlantic Ocean, he is befriended by Trapper Nelson, "the Tarzan of the Loxahatchee", a well-known eccentric who lives off the land.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I just finished reading it again!

  • By Jonathan on 01-11-16

Best narrator I've heard

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-16

Unbelievably talented narrator. Obviously a very smart author. Great ending. Great read for anyone wanting to reminisce about their younger days as an athlete.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Go Set a Watchman

  • A Novel
  • By: Harper Lee
  • Narrated by: Reese Witherspoon
  • Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 14,316
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,124
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13,091

An historic literary event: the publication of a newly discovered novel, the earliest known work from Harper Lee, the beloved, best-selling author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning classic To Kill a Mockingbird. Originally written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman was the novel Harper Lee first submitted to her publishers before To Kill a Mockingbird. Assumed to have been lost, the manuscript was discovered in late 2014.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • To Kill A Mockingbird vs Go Set A Watchman

  • By Sara on 07-15-15

As Wonderful as Expected

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-15

The criticism for this book had me nervous. However, shortly after starting, I fell back in love with the Harper Lee writing I once knew and dove right back into the setting. I loved Scout's final realization that life is not just black and white. There is political and constitutional discussion. It is a book for the young adult who doesn't feel like they fit in this world; for the elderly person who sees so much change on the horizon they can't help but be thrilled to be leaving this world soon; and everyone in between. I loved the dynamic discussion of opposing viewpoints, with family and love in the mix. It is honestly honest and real, with an insight into the black revolution of the south. It shares the heartbreak of To Kill A Mockingbird transferred to dear Scout in her confused struggle between equal rights, trust, family, appearances, and finally, the realization that just because someone's conscience differs from yours, you don't run away from them. You stand your ground, argue your side, and aren't afraid to love beside someone who doesn't see things exactly as you do.
"It's always easy to look back and see who we were. It's hard to see what we ARE."
"The time your friends need you is when they're WRONG. They don't need you when they're right. It takes a certain kind of maturity. Humility."