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Massimiliano Giorgini

Voghera (PV)
  • 3
  • reviews
  • 30
  • helpful votes
  • 34
  • ratings
  • The House of Broken Angels

  • By: Luis Alberto Urrea
  • Narrated by: Luis Alberto Urrea
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 385
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 365
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 362

In his final days, beloved and ailing patriarch Miguel Angel de La Cruz, affectionately called Big Angel, has summoned his entire clan for one last legendary birthday party. But as the party approaches, his mother, nearly 100, dies herself, leading to a farewell doubleheader in a single weekend. Among the guests is Big Angel's half-brother, known as Little Angel, who must reckon with the truth that although he shares a father with his siblings, he has not, as a half gringo, shared a life. Across two bittersweet days in their San Diego neighborhood, the revelers mingle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not death, and Not borders

  • By Clodhopper on 05-01-18

Marvelous story read masterfully by the author!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-18

The House of Broken Angels is a beautiful novel about a Mexican-American family and focuses on the relationship of two brothers as the older one prepares to die. Luis Urrea yet again creates a novel that feels like a transformative spiritual experience—no mean feat, and it has never been done better. Best yet, Urrea himself narrates this audio book, giving the words the inflections they were meant to possess, and in the intended accent—whether speaking English, Spanish or Spanglish. As an avid reader as well as a devourer of audio books, I could recommend this more highly.

29 of 32 people found this review helpful

  • Los girasoles ciegos [The Blind Sunflowers]

  • By: Alberto Méndez
  • Narrated by: José Carlos Domínguez
  • Length: 3 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6

Un capitán del ejército de Franco que, el mismo día de la Victoria, renuncia a ganar la guerra; un niño poeta que huye asustado con su compañera niña embarazada y vive una historia vertiginosa de madurez y muerte en el breve plazo de unos meses; un preso en la cárcel de Porlier que se niega a vivir en la impostura para que el verdugo pueda ser calificado de verdugo; por último, un diácono rijoso que enmascara su lascivia tras el fascismo apostólico que reclama la sangre purificadora del vencido.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent novel, subpar recording

  • By Massimiliano Giorgini on 10-07-17

Excellent novel, subpar recording

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-17

The novel itself and the performance by the narrator are both excellent. The recording itself is inconsistent across sections of the book. Some sections sound perfectly fine, while others are suddenly and inexplicably distorted or lo-if.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Vidas perpendiculares [Perpendicular Lives]

  • By: Álvaro Enrigue
  • Narrated by: Fernando Caride
  • Length: 6 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    2.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2

Jerónimo Rodríguez Loera es en apariencia un niño mexicano como cualquier otro, pero también es un monstruo: recuerda completo el ciclo de sus reencarnaciones y, con él, todo el comportamiento humano. Al recordar sus vidas, Jerónimo presentará al lector el juego eterno al que se deben sus participantes. Echados ya los puentes sobre el modelo de la novela-río, Vidas perpendiculares es una formulación distinta, una novela cuántica, donde los diversos tiempos y espacios son simultáneos.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great story, great narrator - bad editing

  • By Massimiliano Giorgini on 06-06-17

Great story, great narrator - bad editing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-06-17

If you can get past the fact the narrator is obviously Spanish reading a Mexican novel (which doesn't bother me), the recording quality is excellent and the speaker is very professional. HOWEVER - there are several instance when the narrator clears his threat, stops mid-sentence, and starts over. He repeats the lines, but these should have been edited. The worst is Chapter 8, in which there are easily a dozen major errors and stops, and entire sections repeated. Again, had this been edited, the final product would have been excellent - the speaker is great, and the recording tone is good - but it is hard to keep attention on the story when complete sections repeat and suddenly stop.