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Mark

Reno, NV, United States
  • 149
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  • 833
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  • 166
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  • Youtility

  • Why Smart Marketing Is About Help Not Hype
  • By: Jay Baer
  • Narrated by: Marcus Sheridan, Jay Baer
  • Length: 4 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 258
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 208
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 209

Jay Baer's Youtility offers a new approach that cuts through the clutter: marketing that is truly, inherently useful. If you sell something, you make a customer today, but if you genuinely help someone, you create a customer for life. Drawing from real examples of companies who are practicing Youtility as well as his experience helping more than 700 brands improve their marketing strategy, Baer provides a groundbreaking plan for using information and helpfulness to transform the relationship between companies and customers.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good Framing, Examples and Supporting Concepts

  • By Adam Helweh on 10-13-13

Lots of (similar) ideas for making an org useful

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

A colleague suggested our executive team read this. It wasn't like she thought it would be: She thought there would be more about why "hype" is NOT useful in promoting your organization. There's almost nothing on that angle of the subtitle. But I still got a lot out of the book, even if most of it was hammering one point: answer questions that people have about your industry, no matter how silly/dumb — and make sure you answer them publicly, transparently, and fully, with a dash of humor if you can. Do this, and watch your brand exposure explode. What made the book valuable to me were all of the real-world examples, which inspired lots of ideas that our nonprofit organization could try. Grade: B+

  • The Coroner’s Lunch

  • The Dr. Siri Investigations, Book 1
  • By: Colin Cotterill
  • Narrated by: Clive Chafer
  • Length: 7 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,214
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,049
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,047

Laos, 1975: The Communist Pathet Lao has taken over this former French colony. Dr. Siri Paiboun, a 72-year-old Paris-trained doctor, is appointed national coroner. Although he has no training for the job, there is no one else: the rest of the educated class have fled.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Deeply Satisfying Listening Experience

  • By Elizabeth on 09-11-11

Main murders weren't interesting to me

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-18

A Goodreads friend wrote of this book something like, “Wonderful characters, too much woo-woo.” I thought this was the perfect review while I was reading the book but now that I’ve finished, I’ve got a different viewpoint. The characters are indeed wonderful, and the setting (1970s Laos under Communist rule) is interesting and surprisingly charming. But I didn’t mind Dr. Siri talking to ghosts. It felt more folkloric than supernatural. My issue was with the mystery itself — this is a detective novel, where the detective is an elderly coroner. I simply didn’t care about the military-intrigue murders at the core of the story. But the setting and characters were so good that I'll try at least one more in the series. Bechdel test: Fail. Grade: B

The narration is perfect.

  • Lunch with Buddha

  • By: Roland Merullo
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 10 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 790
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 721
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 720

A novel about family, open-minded spirituality, and the American road, Lunch with Buddha accompanies the characters from Breakfast with Buddha as they move further along the path toward lasting peace of mind. Facing one of life's greatest emotional challenges, Otto Ringling takes comfort in a loving family and offbeat lessons from eccentric spiritual teacher Volya Rinpoche.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Better than Breakfast!

  • By tha_fultonz on 08-14-15

If you loved the first book, you'll love this one

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-18

There was one scene where I wanted to stop reading and write a vitriolic review about how the book went off the rails. And I might have, but not too long after, there was a passage that fit seamlessly into the storytelling where the narrator mentions that sometimes when reading a book, something will happen and you'll want to say, “That’s false, that’s a false note.” It doesn’t ruin the book, he says, but it’s memorable. If that little acknowledgment about what happened a few scenes earlier hadn’t taken place when it did, I very well might not have finished the story. I’m glad I did. This is the second book in a trilogy, and like the first book, I don’t know whom I’d recommend it to but it spoke directly to me and I was enchanted throughout. In short, a middle-aged, middle-class white guy once again takes a road trip with an Eastern spiritual master across the United States after the death of a loved one. At this point in the story, our hero has been meditating a while, he’s a loving father, is compassionate, has no real complaints, etc., but for some reason, none of his mindfulness techniques are helping him deal with his current stresses. Somehow Merullo makes this story, which could be very dull, hum along with humor and insight. Bechdel test: The test can’t be applied because it’s told in first person, but it’s a very male-centric book. Grade: A-

The forlorn narration fits the book's tone perfectly.

  • A False Report

  • A True Story of Rape in America
  • By: T. Christian Miller, Ken Armstrong
  • Narrated by: Hillary Huber, T. Christian Miller, Ken Armstrong
  • Length: 10 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 105

On August 11, 2008, 18-year-old Marie reported that a masked man broke into her apartment near Seattle and raped her. Within days, the police swiftly pivoted and began investigating Marie. Confronted with inconsistencies in her story and the doubts of others, Marie broke down and said her story was a lie - a bid for attention. More than two years later, Colorado detectives pursued a serial rapist who photographed his victims, threatening to release the images online, and whose calculated steps to erase all physical evidence suggested he might be a soldier or a cop.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well written, well researched, and profound

  • By Jessica on 02-15-18

Riveting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-18

A riveting book that revolves around a woman who reports being raped, is doubted by the police and her friends, forced to recant, charged with making a false report, and basically made to plead guilty. But she’s not making up the story. Everything is fascinating on so many levels because everyone is interviewed: the woman, the rapist, the detective who charged her with making a false report, the detectives who caught the rapist, other victims. At the end is a rage-inducing description of the history of women not being believed about rape claims, as well as the institutional mechanisms that keep it happening even today. P.S. If you’ve read Jon Krakauer’s “Missoula” and are wondering if you want to tackle another book about rape, please know that they cover completely different territory. Grade: A

Narration is solid.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents a Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo

  • By: Marlon Bundo, Jill Twiss
  • Narrated by: Jim Parsons, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Jeff Garlin, and others
  • Length: 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 13,150
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12,383
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 12,321

HBO's Emmy-winning Last Week Tonight with John Oliver presents the story of a Very Special boy bunny who falls in love with another boy bunny. Meet Marlon Bundo, a lonely bunny who lives with his Grampa, Mike Pence - the Vice President of the United States. But on this Very Special Day, Marlon's life is about to change forever....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This story is cute, but let's be honest.

  • By João on 03-19-18

Get the print or Kindle version instead

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-18

I listened to the book first, and it was good. But then I read the Kindle version and it was so much better. The narrators are great, but it's simply a book better seen than heard because the artwork adds so much.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Natchez Burning

  • A Novel
  • By: Greg Iles
  • Narrated by: David Ledoux
  • Length: 35 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,334
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,026
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,022

Raised in the historic southern splendor of Natchez, Mississippi, Penn Cage learned all he knows of honor and duty from his father, Dr. Tom Cage. But now the beloved family doctor has been accused of murdering Viola Turner, the African-American nurse with whom he worked in the dark days of the 1960s. Penn is determined to save his father, but Tom, stubbornly invoking doctor-patient privilege, refuses to even speak in his own defense.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Terrible Narrator - Really, really BAD

  • By Mary on 05-03-14

Long and not the full story - good narrator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-18

A white supremacist dying of cancer wants to come clean about race murders in the 1960s, but the people who benefit from the killings staying unsolved have other ideas. It's really long (800 pages, 35 hours on audio), and only when it ended did I discover it's Part One in a self-contained trilogy so the reader is only getting started. This may sound daunting, but I’m hooked. It's got the right mix of moral dilemmas, social commentary, and action so it's always interesting, either philosophically or plot-wise. And the way Iles (raised in Natchez, Mississippi) talks about race is so different from East and West coast authors that the book made me rethink some of America's recent history. Grade: A-

As for the narrator, he's better than Dick Hill (who did the first three books in the Penn Cage series), although I don’t think Hill is as bad as many reviewers think. He's just an acquired taste. David Ledoux is good and not histrionic like Hill and does women's voices better. That said, I’ve already started the next book in the trilogy and the next narrator is even better than Ledoux.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Devil's Punchbowl

  • By: Greg Iles
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 23 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,133
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,687
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,676

As a prosecutor in Houston, Penn Cage sent killers to death row. But as mayor of his hometown - Natchez, Mississippi - Penn will face his most dangerous threat. Urged by old friends to try to restore this fading jewel of the Old South, Penn has ridden into office on a tide of support for change. But in its quest for new jobs and fresh money, Natchez has turned to casino gambling, and now five steamboats float on the river beside the old slave market, like props from Gone With the Wind.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Southern Thriller

  • By Brad on 10-01-13

Good book, good narrator even if he's dramatic

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-03-18

I like the moral dilemmas Iles sets up, even if I’m not always in agreement with what seems to be his viewpoint. In this one, the dilemma is whether it’s OK to kill someone who really really deserves it. Another related dilemma is one that was big during the Bush era: When is it OK to allow injustice that harms a few people if you can (allegedly) stop a bigger injustice that harms even more people? The specific story is set around dog fighting (with some gruesome depictions) and prostitution (plus rape). Some writers describe rape from the rapist’s point of view, which can make the act feel understandable or even arousing, whereas in this book, Iles always describes it from the victims’ viewpoint and it is ugly. Good, long yet fast-paced, and thought-provoking. Bechdel test: Pass. Grade: A-

Now, about Dick Hill's narration. I generally like Hill as a narrator, but I can understand why some people might not. His voice for women who are upset can be grating if you don’t like him. But I do. The issue is he acts out the action — laughing when people laugh, shrieking when people shriek. He's very dramatic. So maybe it's just that I’ve listened to so many books narrated by Hill that he's comforting to me, and this book has some pretty harsh scenes, so his occasionally histrionic voice helped carry me through them.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Insidious Intent

  • By: Val McDermid
  • Narrated by: Saul Reichlin
  • Length: 13 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 154
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 148
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 147

In the north of England, single women are beginning to disappear from weddings. A pattern soon becomes clear: Someone is crashing the festivities and luring the women away - only to leave the victims' bodies in their own burned-out cars in remote locations. Tony and Carol are called upon to investigate - but this may be the toughest case they've ever had to face. Meanwhile, Detective Sergeant Paula McIntyre and her partner Elinor must deal with a cruel cyber-blackmailer targeting their teenage ward, Torin.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another stellar mystery. Unfortunate narration.

  • By motleysu on 12-09-17

Should've got a female narrator; book is solid

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-14-18

No spoilers - the end of this one reminds me of the earlier Tony Hill-Carol Jordan book where Tony's mom encounters a serial killer: what happens is perfect but I don't think enough time was spent on the ending. It happens so quickly and shockingly, that I wish McDermid had spent more time on the buildup and then lingered afterward. But it’s just a metaphorical “Boom!” ripping through the main characters. Anyway, in this one, a serial killer targets women who are alone at weddings and wishing they had a partner. The killer’s gimmick feels slight at first but as the book goes along, his motivations feel like they could really happen. One observation on the overall series: the earlier books were creepier and darker. For the past five or so, the methods of killing are less skin-crawling and more about the relationships of the investigators. In this case, I think more skin-crawling would've justified the ending better. Still good. Bechdel test: Pass. Grade: B+

As for the new narrator, I didn't initially like his voice for young men but he soon faded into the background and it was just about the story. Yes, I like the narrator of the earlier books better. But this new one is good, too. However, if the publisher had to change narrators, a woman should've been chosen. The author is female, and the majority of main characters are female. Feels like a poor decision by the publisher.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Ordinary Grace

  • By: William Kent Krueger
  • Narrated by: Rich Orlow
  • Length: 10 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,723
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,218
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,217

Award-winning author William Kent Krueger has gained an immense fan base for his Cork O’Connor series. In Ordinary Grace, Krueger looks back to 1961 to tell the story of Frank Drum, a boy on the cusp of manhood. A typical 13-year-old with a strong, loving family, Frank is devastated when a tragedy forces him to face the unthinkable - and to take on a maturity beyond his years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Wonderful - In Every Way

  • By tooonce72 on 03-29-13

Good but too male-centric for my taste

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-31-17

This is a coming-of-age book with a mystery component that I can see why people love, but I wasn't quite as in awe of it. This my personal preference but it was too male-oriented. Nearly every character is male, and the female characters are stuck in very confining roles: mother, wife, sister, girlfriend. Admittedly, some of this is because the book is told from a boy's point of view around 1960, but it was written now so there's not an excuse for having no women who are really fully developed people with lives and thoughts outside the plot, especially when the males are so richly described and filled with hidden depths. I found myself easily pulled away by other books during the reading of this, even though I enjoyed it while reading it. Your mileage may vary. Grade: B

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Fierce Kingdom

  • A Novel
  • By: Gin Phillips
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 8 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 302
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 280
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 279

The zoo is nearly empty as Joan and her four-year-old son soak up the last few moments of playtime. They are happy, and the day has been close to perfect. But what Joan sees as she hustles her son toward the exit gate minutes before closing time sends her sprinting back into the zoo, her child in her arms. And for the next three hours - the entire scope of the novel - she keeps on running.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Fantastic Fast Paced Listen

  • By Sara on 08-11-17

Good but needed faster pacing or stronger message

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-19-17

A woman tries to survive during an active-shooter situation at a zoo, and her actions are completely skewed by trying to protect her noisy, impatient four-year-old son. It was interesting to see a story of macho male violence almost entirely from the view of women watching it unfold. It could’ve had a heavy-handed message but it very subtly gets the viewpoint across about the essential role women play behind the scenes of society at large. Frankly, I wanted a stronger message or else faster plotting. A subtle message and slow plotting were a bit of a chore. Bechdel test: Pass. Grade: B

2 of 3 people found this review helpful