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  • 96
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  • Genius Foods

  • Become Smarter, Happier, and More Productive While Protecting Your Brain for Life
  • By: Max Lugavere, Paul Grewal
  • Narrated by: Max Lugavere
  • Length: 9 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,035
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 925
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 924

Discover the critical link between your brain and the food you eat, change the way you think about how your brain ages, and achieve optimal brain performance with this powerful new guide from media personality and leading voice in health Max Lugavere.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic Listen and Learn!

  • By laurennicholerx on 04-18-18

One of my all-time FAVE health books!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-19

The timing could not have been more perfect for this book. I started the keto diet in January, and while the ketogenic way of eating offers real weight loss results, I just didn't feel so great on it. I was tired and lethargic, and caught a horrible cold/virus that lasted nearly three weeks, and had a tough time accepting that a daily diet of cheese and meat and fats (even the healthy ones) was right for me. I love salads and veggies, but the keto "police" limits them to very small portions. I just didn't feel that I was giving my immune system and microbiome all the proper nutrition they required. Yet I totally understood and agreed with the science behind keeping insulin low and training your brain and body to use ketones for energy instead of glucose. I struggled with a way to connect keto with "clean" eating. While managing my weight as a middle-age woman is certainly important, it's more important to me to feel my best, look my best, and to avoid becoming a victim of disease. Having lost my mother to aggressive cancer over a decade ago, I didn't want to fall into the same trap. Vitality, vigor, and robust health were my main goals, and I set out to find the answer.

Lo and behold, seemingly out of nowhere, the answers definitely came in the form of this book. I absolutely loved it!!! First of all, it was amazing to me that the author read his own work exceptionally well. Typically, most authors (especially health and wellness ones) are terrible narrators, and it almost always diminishes the value of the content. But in this case. Mr. Lugavere was a fantastic narrator. I loved his sad, personal story about his mother and his quest to seek out answers, and he reads with an engaging tone and cadence that truly makes this book a pleasure to listen to. (He even cracks some funny jokes that had me laughing!) Also, I was pleased to discover how well it was written! Like he literally wrote it with me in mind. Enough science to intrigue me and provide a solid background to his findings, but not so science-y that it was way over my head. This book gave me the permission to still incorporate keto and intermittent fasting in my daily eating plan, while making it clear that I don't need to (nor should I want to!) give up my blueberries or leafy greens or cruciferous veggies -- even if it means going over my low carb allotment. In fact, I learned that going very low cab for extended time periods may not be the healthiest option for me. This book focuses on health and wellness and optimal mental well-being, which is exactly what I had been looking for. I'll probably end up listening to it more than once, because I don't want to miss even one suggestion. It all makes sense, and I know it will affect me in many positive ways. I look forward to more from this author. (I'd love to see a whole series on this topic, like Genius Exercise and Fitness, Genius Biohacks, and maybe even a deeper dive into Genius Superfoods, for those of us who really want to take things to the next level.) Five stars across the board!

  • An Anonymous Girl

  • By: Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen
  • Narrated by: Barrie Kreinik, Julia Whelan
  • Length: 11 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,816
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,613
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,606

Seeking women ages 18-32 to participate in a study on ethics and morality. Generous compensation. Anonymity guaranteed. When Jessica Farris signs up for a psychology study conducted by the mysterious Dr. Shields, she thinks all she’ll have to do is answer a few questions, collect her money, and leave. But as the questions grow more and more intense and invasive and the sessions become outings where Jess is told what to wear and how to act, she begins to feel as though Dr. Shields may know what she’s thinking...and what she’s hiding.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Is it morally wrong to write a bad review?

  • By Meview on 01-11-19

Meh. Mediocre... nothing to really rave about.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-19

I was super excited to preorder this title, as I really (REALLY) loved The Wife Between Us. But to be honest, I wasn't all that impressed with this one, for several reasons:

1) It was just boring. The storyline overall was dull, and not very exciting.
2) The characters weren't really likable. And they weren't especially well developed either. They all had this "flat" quality about them, like two-dimensional.
3) I'm a huge fan of Julia Whelan, and she did a terrific job. And while the other narrator was a perfect voice for Dr. Shields, that particular character was really grating on my nerves for some reason.
4) Nothing about this storyline and plot was all that believable. Some parts of it didn't even make any sense. Other parts were just weird.
5) Finally, I wasn't in love with the ending. Instead of feeling satisfied in the end, I more felt like, "Well, that was 12 hours of my life I'll never get back."

I feel badly leaving a negative review, but I just wasn't fond of the book, especially with the expectations the first one set. Here's the thing: There are two kinds of novels. The great ones immerse you in the story, so that it feels like you stepped into their world. You know the characters intimately, and you're fiercely rooting for one or more of them. You completely lose yourself in the plot, so that everything around you gets totally and completely blocked out, and your house could be set on fire and you'd never know it. You know what I mean. The kind of book (or audiobook) for which you'll pretend you're sick just to sneak in a few more chapters because you absolutely MUST KNOW what happens next. Then there are the average novels. Those are the ones where throughout the whole story, you feel like you're just watching from the sidelines, completely detached and separated from the plot and characters. You know these books because you'll make little remarks along the way. "Oh come on... that's just silly." Or, "What? Wait.. that was a weird direction to take the story." Or, "I swear, if I hear that word one more time, I'm going to scream." That's what this book was. Just average. Which is disappointing, because their first book was one of the "great ones" -- you're far too immersed in the story to even HAVE your own thoughts. Know what I mean??

Anyway, better luck next time around. Maybe others will like it better than I did.

  • 48 Hours

  • By: William R. Forstchen
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 11 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 531
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 508
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 505

In 48 hours, the Earth will be hit by a coronal mass ejection (CME) from the sun, a "Carrington Event" that has the power to shut down and possibly destroy the world's electrical infrastructure. To try and prevent permanent damage, everything goes dark prior to the hit: Global communications are shut down; hospital emergency generators are disconnected; the entire internet, media broadcasting, and cell phone systems are turned off. Will the world's population successfully defend itself in the wake of the CME, or will mass panic lead to the breakdown of society as we know it?

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Not a typical Forstchen book

  • By Preparing4SHTF on 01-16-19

Debating whether to continue on...

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-19

Disclaimer: I haven't yet listened to the whole book. I was really excited to pre-order this one, because I loved One Second After so much, and am a fan of all things post-apocalyptic. But I have to say, I'm about a half hour into it, and I'm debating whether to A) Return it for my credit back or B) Just set it aside for a while and come back to it some other time. That whole second scene at the beginning with the nutty professor and his "demonstration" of a CME was THE MOST GRUELING THING I'd ever listened to. I know, I know... I should have just skipped ahead. I guess I kept thinking that it HAD to end at some point. But no. It just went on and on. I don't know if Mr. Forstchen thought we all have the intelligence of a third grader, or if he just thought it was funny. But it's nearly ruined the book for me. It doesn't help that I'm just not a fan of Bronson Pinchot's narrating. (If I hear the world "million" drawn out to something that takes 5 whole seconds one more time, I WILL scream.) Unfortunately, I can't undo what I've listened to. But I'm too annoyed to continue. I think I'll just leave it alone for a month or two, and try coming back to it another time -- making sure to entirely skip over Chapter 2. Let's hope the rest of the book gets significantly better.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Perfect Family

  • By: Shalini Boland
  • Narrated by: Katie Villa
  • Length: 7 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 659
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 597
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 592

Gemma Ballantine is getting ready for work one morning when her eldest child comes running down the stairs saying the words every mother dreads. The front door is open. And her six-year-old daughter has disappeared. Frantic with fear, Gemma starts a nail-biting search for her little girl. After what feels like forever, her mother-in-law, Diane, finds Katie wandering lost a few streets away. Relieved to have her youngest child back in her arms, breathing in the sweet scent of her hair, Gemma thinks the nightmare is over. But then her perfect family starts to fall apart....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Solid Psychological Thriller

  • By Wendi on 12-02-18

It was great! Best one yet.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-19

I've listened to all of Shalini Boland's books, and I think this is her best yet. You know what I loved about this book? That the female character wasn't a hand-wringing, mousy, intimidated woman with zero self confidence or backbone. That seems to be the trend these days with psychological thrillers, and nothing annoys me more than a helpless protagonist who whines and cries and convinces herself she's going crazy without taking any decisive action. But not this book, much to my delight. Gemma is a strong, capable, savvy business woman who knows when red flags are going up, and she's determined to take control and put a stop to things. It was refreshing to read a book like this. I mean, strong women can be victims of psychotics, too, you know. =) Some psychological thrillers have plots that don't even seem plausible, but this one was pretty realistic. The narration was terrific, and I listened nearly straight through. It was one of those "unputdownable" books. The only downside was that I figured out the ending pretty early on in the book, which didn't distract from the story. But it IS more fun having a storyline that totally takes you off guard at the end. Still, this was a winner. Highly recommend.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Lake Success

  • A Novel
  • By: Gary Shteyngart
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey, Soneela Nankani
  • Length: 13 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 322
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 301
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 295

Narcissistic, hilariously self-deluded, and divorced from the real world as most of us know it, hedge-fund manager Barry Cohen oversees $2.4 billion in assets. Deeply stressed by an SEC investigation and by his three-year-old son’s diagnosis of autism, he flees New York on a Greyhound bus in search of a simpler, more romantic life with his old college sweetheart. Meanwhile, his super-smart wife, Seema - a driven first-generation American who craved the picture-perfect life that comes with wealth - has her own demons to face. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A funny and story set very much in our time

  • By Diana on 09-10-18

Meh...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-18

This just wasn't all that interesting. Not what I thought it would be. After about 30 minutes, I finally deleted and will return for a credit. Certainly not worth spending more than 13 hours of my time.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Letters to the Church

  • By: Francis Chan
  • Narrated by: Ramon de Ocampo
  • Length: 5 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,131
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 989
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 977

Millions are satisfied to sit through hour-long, weekly religious services. Millions more have left the church, brokenhearted and cynical. But God is waking up his people - people who will risk everything and sacrifice anything to become the dynamic, powerful church seen in Scripture. We Are Church calls Christ-followers, young and old, to hold fast to their biblical roots while seeking radical change. Scripture promises an exuberant and unstoppable church. That wondrous early church of acts can be our reality today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stings

  • By Raeshan Peterson on 09-16-18

I really, really wanted to love this! But...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-18

...I just didn’t, to my disappointment. I had hoped this book would provide a fiery, enlightening inspiration to connect closer with God, and learn more about His plan for me. I devoured Crazy Love when it came out, and I think Francis Chan is without a doubt one of the most influential, heartfelt, and truly faithful Christ ambassadors of our time. I’m in awe of his humility, and assumed he purposely chose not to narrate this in an effort to be less “celebrity,“ but unfortunately his passion and charisma didn’t at all come through with this narrator. (Is the narrator even a Christian?) I so very much appreciate Chan's passion for faith-based living, and his willingness to obey God. I listened to this book all the way through after downloading, and felt... well, honestly... not even worthy of reading it. In this book, Chan carefully explained the problems he saw with the church by comparing them to how the Scriptures described a “healthy” church the way God intended it. He went in-depth on several topics, from serving others to revering God's holiness. All good stuff, but unfortunately it just didn’t move my heart in the way I hoped it would.

For starters, I recently read an estimate that there are roughly 385,000 churches in America. That means there’s a church for approximately every 1,000 people. That's a lot of weekend church services praising, worshipping, and studying scripture messages! A pretty phenomenal ratio, I think. Maybe I’m totally wrong. But either way, if our American church model was truly so “broken” and off-path, would God really have allowed so many of them to flourish and sustain themselves all this time, saving so many and changing SO many lives, only for us all to suddenly learn that we’ve been doing it wrong all along and He's displeased with us? Ouch. Not only does that sting a little, but it’s totally confusing. Do we really love, worship, and trust a God who would fill and bless this land with believers, but trick us for the past 300 years into doing it totally wrong? I don’t understand that. I mean, yes... nearly every church has its flaws. But isn’t that expected of something run by flawed, messy humans?. I am not speaking for the Lord by any means, but as a believer, I’d give many of these churches an “A.” I’ve seen the incredible things small group or addiction groups have done to change lives. Seen the amazing results of overseas missions. Praised with the worship band in a way that brought me to tears. And listened, enraptured as something our pastor explained became illuminated for me as if God Himself shined a spotlight directly at me. Most times I've left a church service so filled with the spirit that it affected me profoundly throughout the week. Those times might give me the courage to share my testimony with a co-worker, or perhaps give a huge tip to a weary waitress and write a little note saying, “Jesus wanted you to have this.”

My husband and I have had an extemely challenging few years, and we live in a very remote area and work full-time to make ends meet. Most days, I can barely even get myself showered and into bed at night. Some days it’s literally a miracle. Chan's concept of major, life-altering service and deep involvement/interaction/participation within the church is just not something I can even fathom, let alone refine to the standards outlined in this book. By those, I am a complete and utter failure. I felt longing and envy regarding his story about fervent, passionate Asians who begged in prayer to be used as martyrs. I would love to do and feel the same! But what are we supposed to do here in America? It’s not feasible that we all quit our jobs and pack up to move to impoverished countries. But nor can I drum up much fervor and martyrdom by sitting in on a teleconference with my office co-workers for an 8-hour training session involving Power Points, then needing to cook a meatloaf dinner afterwards. I also felt envy at the amazing, soul-blasting 14-hour Bible study session Chan had with his fellow home-church attendees. How does one even begin to carve out that kind of time?? Might God be preparing a special path for us down the road, or using us in ways we don’t see yet? Maybe. We pray constantly for that. But maybe He's already using us on ways that our small minds can’t understand fully, because it pertains to that big, awesome, incomprehensible thing called “eternity.” As a tired, overworked introvert who lives in a teeny-tiny rural town of about 4,000 people, I can honestly say that I don’t feel that this outline of Chan's redefined church is what God intends for my family. At least not in this season of our life. Maybe in the future we'll feel led to move or dive head-first into a totally new life with a different purpose and ministry, but what do we do in the mean time? What if that move never comes? What if we stay put? Are there not other ways to worship and serve God's kingdom?

Every line spoken was so full of radical interaction, involvement, and service that somehow doesn’t fit the puzzle of our lives God created for my husband and me. So with that, how can I best serve God and others with what I have and what I'm capable of right now? Sadly, I didn’t get the inspiration I was looking for here. I probably should go back and re-read A Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren. It’s been several years.

My point is this: if you’re a leader or elder in a church, or you are a churchgoer who feels the Spirit compelling you to do something that creates impactful change while serving more, this book is absolutely for you. You will love it. However, if you’re an everyday regular suburban or Midwest American that can only manage the energy and time to find small, incremental ways to serve God throughout your day, then don’t listen to this. I don’t even come close to being at the spiritual “level” Francis Chan is at. “To whom much is given, much will be expected.” Chan and his family, and his fellow church leaders in California have much, and this book is an excellent guide for those like them. But my husband and I have been given little by comparison, and we have to find a way to know that we’re serving God in the right way for our lives. I couldn’t even wrap my head around some of the stuff Chan was expecting of his church. It’s for people whom God has given ten talents. For the rest of us who have been given only one or two talents, look elsewhere on how to best use them. For now, we're just going to ensure that all of our work, and our menial tasks, and our human encounters we conduct daily are as if we're doing them all directly for God. Even that blasted laundry I can never seem to keep up with.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • The Botanist’s Daughter

  • By: Kayte Nunn
  • Narrated by: Caroline Lee
  • Length: 12 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 22

In Victorian England, headstrong adventuress Elizabeth takes up her late father's quest for a rare, miraculous plant. She faces a perilous sea voyage, unforeseen dangers and treachery that threatens her entire family. In present-day Australia, Anna finds a mysterious metal box containing a sketchbook of dazzling watercolours, a photograph inscribed 'Spring 1886' and a small bag of seeds. It sets her on a path far from her safe, carefully ordered life and on a journey that will force her to face her own demons. 

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Caroline Lee is superb! But the story not so much

  • By Maria on 08-22-18

Caroline Lee is superb! But the story not so much

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-18

I immediately buy every single audiobook that Caroline Lee narrates -- she is my all-time favorite narrator. I absolutely adore the novels by Kate Morton, Kimberley Freeman, Belinda Alexander, and some of the other Australian authors who write such gorgeous stories that weave together the past and the present. So naturally, I dove in eagerly, expecting this to be one of them. Unfortunately, it's just not. It's pretty boring. The plot moves sooooo slowly without much excitement or mystery or build-up, and the character development is weak. I wasn't enthralled with Elizabeth's story, and Anna's was just as dull. What a sad disappointment. I always feel badly giving negative reviews, but save your credit. I love Ms. Lee so much that I pushed my way through it, but ultimately, I gave up about half-way through. I just didn't care what happened, and I was completely bored. If you're looking for something similar to Kate Morton, sadly this just isn't it. And if you're a fan of Caroline Lee, wait for her next book to come out. As usual she was brilliant, yet I can't help but to wonder if she was just as bored recording this as I was reading it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Shortest Way Home

  • A Novel
  • By: Miriam Parker
  • Narrated by: Abby Craden
  • Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 35

Hannah is finally about to have everything she ever wanted. With a high-paying job, a Manhattan apartment, and a boyfriend about to propose, all she and Ethan have to do is make it through the last couple of weeks of grad school. But when, on a romantic weekend trip to Sonoma, Hannah is spontaneously offered a marketing job at a family-run winery and doesn't immediately refuse, the couple's meticulously planned forever threatens to come crashing down. Then Hannah impulsively does the unthinkable - she takes a leap of faith. Abandoning your dream job and life shouldn't feel this good.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • This one glaring flaw killed the book for me...!!

  • By Maria on 08-22-18

This one glaring flaw killed the book for me...!!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-18

I don't understand it, really. Miriam Parker told a really cool story, with gorgeous descriptions of wine, of food, and of the Sonoma Valley wine region. The plot was really interesting, and held my attention. Her writing was engaging, vivid, compelling, and her character development superb. In nearly every way, I would have put her writing at a much higher level than most authors for the splendid way she delivered this heartwarming story... except for the one flaw (that others mentioned in their reviews). Every single paragraph of dialog was riddled with, "he said..." and "she said..." Over and over and over. Sometimes several times in a row, repeatedly. WHY??? How is that even possible? How can such a wonderful author who writes so descriptively and beautifully make such a distracting, elementary-level faux pas, without a single editor mentioning it before publication? By the end of the book, it was like nails on a chalkboard. It completely took me out of the story. I can't tell you how many times I rolled my eyes and thought to myself, "She quipped?" "He acquiesced?" "She responded lightly?" "He replied?" "She conceded?" "He begged?" "She stammered?" "He mentioned briefly?" "She stated matter-of-factly?" I came up with a hundred other ways to say "he said/she said," and this author couldn't even come up with one. UGH! What a shame, because if not for that, I would have recommended this book to many friends who would love this kind of story, but I know that it would drive them just as mad as it drove me. Enough SAID.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Ghosted

  • A Novel
  • By: Rosie Walsh
  • Narrated by: Katherine Press
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 604
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 554
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 553

When Sarah meets Eddie, they connect instantly and fall in love. To Sarah, it seems as though her life has finally begun. And it's mutual: It's as though Eddie has been waiting for her, too. Sarah has never been so certain of anything. So when Eddie leaves for a long-booked vacation and promises to call from the airport, she has no cause to doubt him. But he doesn't call. Sarah's friends tell her to forget about him, but she can't. She knows something's happened - there must be an explanation. 

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Slow pace

  • By katiwei on 07-29-18

A book about nothing that goes nowhere...

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-18

I always feel badly giving negative reviews, but in some cases (like this one), I just feel it’s my duty. Don’t bother wasting your credit. The book is over 9 hours, and I gave it a solid effort of over 4 hours. And then I just couldn’t go any further. Nothing happens. This gal Sarah meets a guy Eddie, and they fall magically, perfectly in love during the 7days they had spent together. They both promise to meet up again immediately after Eddie comes back from his holiday vacation trip, but he never calls or writes again. The premise sounds interesting, but endless chapter after chapter is just a dull monotony of Sarah sending him unanswered texts, and stalking his Facebook page, and crying, and trying to figure out why he didn’t get in touch when she was sure he was the love of her life. A connection begins to emerge about Eddie and the car crash her sister died in when they were younger, but it’s not even a compelling or mysterious connection that makes you want to keep reading. When I got to the part where Eddie secretly followed Sarah to L.A. and she kept spotting him and hearing he was looking for her, it alljust seemed so silly. None of the characters were likeable, and I honestly didn’t really care what happened to any of them.

I always say that a great author has to be both a fantastic storyteller and a fantastic writer. This author is pretty good at writing, but the storytelling part needs work.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • All These Beautiful Strangers

  • A Novel
  • By: Elizabeth Klehfoth
  • Narrated by: Caitlin Kelly, Xe Sands, Greg Tremblay
  • Length: 14 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 181
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 172
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 170

A young woman haunted by a family tragedy is caught up in a dangerous web of lies and deception involving a secret society in this highly charged, addictive psychological thriller that combines the dishy gamesmanship of Gossip Girl with the murky atmosphere of The Secret History. One summer day, Grace Fairchild, the beautiful young wife of real estate mogul Alistair Calloway, vanished from the family’s lake house without a trace, leaving behind her seven-year old daughter, Charlie, and a slew of unanswered questions. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I really liked this book!

  • By Maria on 07-29-18

I really liked this book!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-29-18

Even though this book COULD be considered a Y/A psychological thriller, it was more than adult enough for me. The plot revolves around boarding school student Charlotte (Charlie) Calloway, whose mother supposedly ran away when she was young. Each chapter weaves the mystery of her boarding school, her mother, her family's secrets, and her personal conflicts with her own shortcomings in a way that I thought was pretty intriguing and compelling. I've listened to a lot of psychological thrillers, and they not only have to grab me from the get-go, but keep me interested all the way through. This one did. The ending was satisfying, and the narrators did a great job. I give it two thumbs up, and recommend it!

9 of 9 people found this review helpful