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Karl

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  • There There

  • A Novel
  • By: Tommy Orange
  • Narrated by: Darrell Dennis, Shaun Taylor-Corbett, Alma Ceurvo, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,319
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,101
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,089

Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life back together after his uncle's death and has come to work at the powwow to honor his uncle's memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and will perform in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and loss.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Highly recommend.

  • By Rachel Subido on 07-09-18

Fantastic!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-19

This is a standout. The book is actually multiple stories all centered around one event that the characters attend at the books end. Every story held my interest, but there were definite standouts. The dialogue of the three brothers was wonderful - I could hear my friends and I talking to each other like that, but it was interesting to see how little bits of information in what they said added up to a vivid picture of each boy. But there wasn't a bad story in the bunch. The book was funny, sad, and touching. The narration was superb - one of the best multi-narrator books I've listened to. I'm definitely listening to this again, which I rarely do.

  • Folsom Untold: The Strange True Story of Johnny Cash's Greatest Album

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Danny Robins
  • Narrated by: Danny Robins
  • Length: 2 hrs and 21 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 8,587
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 7,795
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7,778

This is the story of one of the greatest records ever made - Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison - and its shocking and tragic aftermath. Join award-winning journalist Danny Robins on the 50th anniversary of the album as he takes you on a road trip back to 1968, a pivotal year in US history, to investigate the dramatic and unlikely friendship between Johnny Cash, American icon, and Glen Sherley, armed robber and Folsom inmate, and how that friendship was violently torn apart. 

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Very disappointing.

  • By Margaret on 02-04-19

Are all British podcasts like this?

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-19

This seems like an extended podcast and I can only compare this to "The Ratline" from the BBC in that:
1) The language is overblown; everything is made to seem momentous and there are constant teasers that turn out to be nothing special.
2) The dramatizations are unecessary and distracting. When you say "The phone rang." it's really not necessary to have a phone ring. I know what a phone sounds like. Also, nothing is gained though the dialogue that's dramatized.
3) The story itself is interesting enough and the creators would have better served the story to just present it. They have plenty of interesting people to talk to. All of the overblown language to make the story seem more dramatic, just makes it seem like I'm reading a tabloid version.
4) In working hard to make the story seem gripping, the narrator seems to take every opportunity to try to inject drama. When discussing Folsom with an ex-guard, he says something like "So there are murderers, bank robbers and rapists in there"? No kidding. It's a JAIL!
Made it more than halfway because I love the album, before I was worn out by the narration.

  • The Prague Sonata

  • By: Bradford Morrow
  • Narrated by: Christina Delaine
  • Length: 18 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 40
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 40

In the early days of the new millennium, pages of a worn and weathered original sonata manuscript - the gift of a Czech immigrant living out her final days in Queens - come into the hands of Meta Taverner, a young musicologist whose concert piano career was cut short by an injury. To Meta's eye, it appears to be an authentic 18th-century work; to her discerning ear, the music rendered there is commanding, hauntingly beautiful, clearly the undiscovered composition of a master. But there is no indication of who the composer might be.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful topic, writer gets in the way

  • By Amber's mom on 07-31-18

Good premise for a story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-18

The basic story is interesting and seemed promising. The issue is that the narration is not great - the accents are distracting (is Sam supposed to be a cowboy?) and the delivery is overly dramatic, but part of the latter is how the book is written. The other issue the is dialogue. I kept thinking as I listened "nobody talks like that" and the portrayel of certain events in the book was over the top for what actually happened. By the middle of the book, I felt as though I were reading a romance novel. Really could have used a good editor.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Empire of the Summer Moon audiobook cover art
  • Empire of the Summer Moon

  • By: S. C. Gwynne
  • Narrated by: David Drummond
  • Length: 15 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,155
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,668
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,684

Few people realize that the Comanche Indians were the greatest warring tribe in American history. Their 40-year battle with settlers held up the development of the new nation. Empire of the Summer Moon tells of the rise and fall of this fierce, powerful, and proud tribe, and begins in 1836 with the kidnapping of a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower blue eyes named Cynthia Ann Parker.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • When a great book and a great reader come together

  • By Richard on 01-01-11

More than a Biography

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-26-12

I went into this book thinking that it might be more than I want to know about one particular person, especially given the length of this book. The author however fleshes out the book with helpful digressions on: the history of Texas, what it was like to be a plains indian in the 1880's, background on the Comanches, information on other tribes in the areas, what happened to captives of the Comanches etc. etc. The book is really a nice balance between a history of the last years of the Comanches and a biography of a single person living during that time. In fact, one could easily make the argument that this book is not really "about" Quanah Parker as you really only get the his story at the end of the book.

The book is nicely balanced between individual interesting anecdotes and material of broad sweep. And there is enough background information to help you really understand the amazing transformation of Quanah for plains indian living the traditional nomadic life to someone trying to adapt to living in white society. Without all of the background information it would have been difficult to appreciate the full tragedy of his story. And clearly the author has done a lot of research for this book.

Now to the reader: In a word, David Drummond is excellent. He reads with enough enthusiasm to convey the wonder of the story, but not the breathless awe that some readers affect that just sounds "off". I haven't enjoyed a reading this much in a long time and will seek out other titles that he's read. Really a pitch-perfect performance.

  • Genius

  • The Life and Science of Richard Feynman
  • By: James Gleick
  • Narrated by: Dick Estell
  • Length: 20 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 462
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 388
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 389

From the author of the national best seller Chaos comes an outstanding biography of one of the most dazzling and flamboyant scientists of the 20th century that "not only paints a highly attractive portrait of Feynman but also . . . makes for a stimulating adventure in the annals of science." ( The New York Times).

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Biography!

  • By Douglas on 04-07-13

Good General Biography, Reader a Bit Lacking

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-22-11

This is a good general-purpose biography of the physicist Richard Feynman. Given that it's written for the average reader, it doesn't go into great depth about the Feynman's work. It does, however, give a good feel for Physics during the time that Feynman was beginning his career, notably during the period when he was working at Los Alamos. The beginning skips around quite a bit providing some background, so be patient, it does get around to Feynman's life. The only issue is with the reader. He manages to mis-pronounce a fair number of names in the book and someone should have taken the time to edit the performance so as to catch the mispronounciations in the mathematics and physics terms (e.g., "matrices" is *not* pronounced "matresses".)

14 of 18 people found this review helpful