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The Rustic Bibliophile

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  • reviews
  • 16
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  • 93
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  • The Road

  • By: Cormac McCarthy
  • Narrated by: Tom Stechschulte
  • Length: 6 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12,733
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,802
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,829

America is a barren landscape of smoldering ashes, devoid of life except for those people still struggling to scratch out some type of existence. Amidst this destruction, a father and his young son walk, always toward the coast, but with no real understanding that circumstances will improve once they arrive. Still, they persevere, and their relationship comes to represent goodness in a world of utter devastation.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • I tried to like it

  • By lavalleem on 10-07-18

Beautiful. Tragic. Dark. Hopeful.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-18

The Road is a Pulitzer Prize winning post-apocalyptic novel by Cormac McCarthy.

This is the harrowing tale of a man and his boy trekking across a barren and ominous landscape with hopes of finding a better life. The Road resonated with me down to my soul with it's quiet poetic darkness that somehow still conveyed love and hope throughout the tale. The love and sacrifice that the man gave to his son was a perfect picture of the love of a parent and broke my heart several times over as the man struggled to provide safety, food, and emotional security for his boy.

The various dangers during their journey included cannibals, a toxic wasteland, bitter cold, the fear of starvation, and sickness. The book in it's entirety was beautifully tragic and still has my mind drifting to it days after finishing it.

It is a story of hope.

It is a story of love.

It is a story of human resilience. 

0 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Three Wishes

  • By: Kristen Ashley
  • Narrated by: Carly Robins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,949
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,803
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,799

When Lily Jacobs was born, she inherited Fazire - a genie. Her family had three wishes and they'd only ever used one so Fazire was stuck in the human world. This worked since he'd become a member of the family anyway. Even with a genie, Lily's young life wasn't perfect. To escape the kids making her miserable at school, Lily buried herself in romance novels. One day, when the teasing was just too much, she used one of her wishes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Cute but long

  • By Danni on 06-23-17

Decent romance

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-22-18

I’ve been wanting to get my hands on Three Wishes ever since I saw that beautiful cover a few months ago. I’ve never read a story about genies or jin so I’m not able to compare this book to any others within this topic. As a romance though, it was a sweet (sometimes too sweet) tale. There were a couple common tropes in the book, mainly catastrophic misunderstandings and a sweet/innocent virgin girl tries to melt the heart of a bad boy with a tragic backstory.

The characters were hard for me to relate to and somewhat forgettable. Lily is literally perfect, and I do mean it in the most literal way possible. She was “created” to be perfect. It’s hard for me to connect with characters that have zero flaws. Nate was a little more deep, but I didn’t think his back story or character development was particularly interesting. In fact, I thought his supposed dubious history was a little anti-climactic, or maybe I just like a little more grit and heartache for my characters 😈. A minor character become my favorite and I found myself wishing she was in more scenes (Maxine, Lily’s boisterous and charismatic boss). Fazire, the snarky genie, also carried the story for me more than Lily or Nate.

Overall it was a light-hearted read with a satisfying ending, but not something I would pick up again.

  • Restore Me

  • Shatter Me, Book 4
  • By: Tahereh Mafi
  • Narrated by: Kate Simses, James Fouhey
  • Length: 8 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 367
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 336
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335

Juliette and Warner's story continues in the electrifying fourth installment of Tahereh Mafi's New York Times best-selling Shatter Me series. Juliette Ferrars thought she'd won. She took over Sector 45, was named the new Supreme Commander of North America, and now has Warner by her side. But when tragedy strikes, she must confront the darkness that dwells both around and inside her. Who will she become in the face of adversity? Will she be able to control the power she wields and use it for good?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Short story that’s as long as a book.

  • By halloween.mama on 04-28-18

SO GOOD

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-22-18

This review contains spoilers for the first 3 books of the Shatter Me series, but no spoilers for Restore Me.

Y’all. I feel like I have been waiting for this book for a lifetime. Shatter Me was one of the first books I read after about a 5 year reading slump. I completely devoured the 3 book series in a matter of days, but like other fans, felt like the story was missing something. The ending just wasn’t quite right and felt rushed, so when I heard Mafi was releasing THREE MORE BOOKS I fan-girl screamed. I was SO excited. Then I was nervous. What if the books don’t resonate with me like they did when I first read them? What if immersing myself back into Sector 45 and the Reestablishment ruins the previous love I had for this series? And most important of all: WHAT IF JULIETTE AND WARNER AREN’T ENDGAME?!

I mean, it’s not like Mafi hasn’t switched up love interests before. My gamut of emotions and fears aside, of course I was going to read this book and I am so glad I did. There were a lot of critiques of Ignite Me, mainly how Adam’s character changed so quickly and how everything was wrapped up in a neat little bow at the end. I feel like Mafi did an excellent job addressing these issues. You get insight into Adam’s motives and character progression that show you where he was coming from in acting like a complete dick the entire third book. Juliette dealing with the aftermath of becoming Supreme Commander is a main focus this book, and it provided a lot of world building info we were missing in the first three books finally giving some background info about how the reestablishment came to be. Restore Me actually only takes place over a period of a few days, but it is full of action and character development (particularly Warner).

Let’s talk about Warner: first of all, he is even better in this book. Restore Me is told in both Juliette and Warner’s POV so you get a deep look into Warner’s tortured mind. Warner suffers from PTSD (from his abusive asshole father) and anxiety with the presence of panic attacks. Mental health representation is so important and I thought Mafi did a wonderful job addressing this particular struggle. I really liked being able to be inside both Warner and Juliette’s mind, but I am hoping this isn’t foreshadowing a death (as Allegiant did with having a dual POV with Four and Tris).

Overall, I really loved the book. Juliette still annoys me, but not enough to keep me away from reading the rest of the series.

Oh, and THAT ENDING THOUGH 😲😲😲😲😲😲😲😲

  • The Gender Game

  • By: Bella Forrest
  • Narrated by: Rebecca Soler, Zachary Webber
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,394
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,924
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,928

A toxic river divides 19-year-old Violet Bates' world by gender. Women rule the East. Men rule the West. Welcome to the lands of Matrus and Patrus. Ever since the disappearance of her beloved younger brother, Violet's life has been consumed by an anger she struggles to control. Already a prisoner to her own nation, now she has been sentenced to death for her crimes. But one decision could save her life. To enter the kingdom of Patrus, where men rule and women submit.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Plot line is asinine in so many places.

  • By L. D. Brown on 08-30-17

Fast-paced YA dystopian

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-17

I have been meaning to read a Bella Forrest novel for a while. I know she has the Shade of Vampire series, but I'm really picky with vampire stories so I never checked them out. I didn't go into The Gender Game with high expectations because I know Ms. Forrest pumps out books like crazy (like 4-5 books a year). I have found with other independent authors who crank out books that quickly that sometimes editing is sub-par, but as long as the story is good I generally don't mind. With that being said, the book was better than I expected. Yes, there were a few issues: the letter at the end (don't want to spoil it) felt too convenient and disingenuous to the story, some characterization for a major character in the book was a little underdone, and the world building left me wanting more. However, The Gender Game also had some great elements to it: 

-Strong and likable female lead character
-Unique dystopian world in a genre overflowing with unoriginal ideas
-Lots of action
-Quickly paced
-Just enough romance to tease you, but not to overpower the narrative
-Also, The author clearly did research on MMA fighting and the fighting scenes never felt forced 

Overall, I enjoyed the book and will be continuing the series. I will likely not do reviews on this blog for the following books, but I will review on Goodreads, as I find doing reviews here for sequels not very helpful.  

Review of the audio:
I've been a fan of Rebecca Soler since listening to the Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer. I thought it might be difficult to separate Cinder's voice from Violet's, but I found it relatively easy as I was drawn into the story. Rebecca Soler remains to be one of my favorite narrators, as she brings life to characters through her superb voice acting abilities. Zachary Webber only did a small portion at the end of the book, but I have also listened to him before and enjoy his voice. 

  • Darkness of Light

  • Darkness, Book 1
  • By: Stacey Marie Brown
  • Narrated by: Michelle Sparks
  • Length: 10 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 576
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 523
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 522

Freak. Witch. Crazy. Schizo. Ember Brycin has been called them all. She's always known she's different. No one has ever called her normal, even under the best circumstances. Bizarre and inexplicable things continually happen to her, and having two different colored eyes, strange hair, and an unusual tattoo only contributes to the gossip about her. When the latest school explosion lands her in a facility for trouble teens, she meets Eli Dragen, who's hot as hell and darkly mysterious.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A welcomed surprise & enjoyment

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-10-15

Great NA Paranormal Romance

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-17

Stacey Marie Brown has quickly become one of my go-to NA paranormal romance authors. Darkness of Light is a little less gritty than her Collector series, but great none-the-less.

AUDIBLE 20 REVIEW SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY

  • Rimrider

  • Rimrider Adventures, Volume 1
  • By: L.A. Kelley
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Richardson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

Awakened by her father, teenager Jane Benedict is ordered to memorize a mysterious code. Hours later, Mathias Benedict is dead and Jane and her brother, Will, are wards of United Earth Corporation. To evade the company's murderous clutches and uncover the meaning of her father's last message, Jane leads Will on a desperate escape across the galaxy aboard the Freetrader smuggler ship, Solar Vortex. Tangled in the crew's fight for freedom, Jane saves the life of young smuggler, Mac Sawyer, and learns her father's code identifies a secret cargo shipment.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining

  • By Arwen in NM on 01-28-18

Good, Clean YA

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-17

Review of the story:

Rimrider is about a young girl (Jane) and her little brother (Will) who have become orphans within the first chapter of the book and their fight for survival and what family means for them. Jane and Will escape their parent’s killers (the government) by boarding a space ship and getting involved with space pirates, rebels, and spies.

This book was difficult for me to get in to until about 20%. I think part of the reason is because I couldn’t connect with Jane. She is very young, and quite immature for the YA genre of heroines. Now, I will say that sometimes I forget how young YA heroines are because so much seems to get piled on them and they are often thrown into very adult situations, but Jane was hard to like in general . Her disposition was a little whiny and she lacked emotion for things like her father’s death. She does seem to grow up quickly though and becomes decidedly more likable as the book progresses.

With that being said, I did enjoy the book about 20% in and after. The world building was interesting, but not confusing and so big as to distract from the story. Secondary characters really held their own (Gem is the best) and the plot of the book was interesting and fun to read, albeit a little predictable at times. The book ends by setting up for the next book, but with no major cliffhangers. I would rate the story 3.5/5 stars.

Review of the audio:

I’ve never listened to any of Cassandra Richardson’s narrations before, but I think she did a pretty good performance. Her characters were easy to distinguish from one another and her male voices were believable. I will say, sometimes her voice for Jane got a little whiny, but honestly that could have been intentional. I needed to keep reminding myself that Jane was a sheltered 15-16 year old who would likely have reason to be whiny sometimes, so it wasn’t really a mark against the actual narration. Overall the narration itself was 4/5 stars.

  • The Glitch

  • The Glitches Series, Book 1
  • By: Ramona Finn
  • Narrated by: Genevieve Kaplan
  • Length: 6 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 28

On the brink of extinction, being human means more than just surviving. In Lib's world, it's dangerous to deviate from the norm. In fact, for someone who doesn't live up to the Artificial Intelligence's standards, it's practically a death sentence. Lib learns this the hard way when she wakes up in a barren wasteland, with her memories erased, and only one thought lodged in her mind: "It's all my fault." Lib is a Glitch - an imperfect human component of the utopian world called the Norm.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting YA story

  • By Rabid Reader on 04-02-17

Solid YA dystopian sci-fi

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-17

Review of the story:
Glitch starts off by immediately throwing readers into a whirlwind of action. Our female protagonist (Lib) wakes up in a desert and remembers nothing- and I mean, nothing. Not her name, age, what she looks like, or even basic words at first. Over the course of the book Lib starts to have fleeting memories about who she may have been and her "purpose", but it's not until the end where we start to get big answers.

After Lib wakes up she notices another girl in trouble and instinctively saves her life. The girl (Skye) brings Lib to a group of people surviving outside the "Norm" (where Lib learns she was cast out from). The group of people is called a Clan and is comprised of Glitches like Lib, and Rouges, people born outside the Norm. It take a little bit longer than I would have liked to get an explanation to what a Glitch actually is, and this starts to enter spoiler territory so I won't go into it too much. I can say however, that Glitches are people who used to live inside the norm but were tossed out due to the AI who runs the norm deeming them as malfunctioned.

As the story progresses we see Lib struggle to gain the trust of her newfound friends and start to uncover truths about the Norm, the AI, herself, and the world that is falling apart around them. There is a little romance, but it definitely doesn't overpower the main story-line.

The Clan reminds me of the Grounders from the show The 100. The language that is more harsh and to-the point, the lack of technology, and the reliance on folk-like traditions showed similarities to that group. If you like that aspect of the show, I think you will love the world that Finn has built outside of the Norm.

My only complaint about the book is the lack of character development. I am very much a plot driven type of reader, so the action in this book was appealing to me. I do think however, it could have been slowed down a little for more character development. This would have allowed for more emotional connection not just to the protagonist, but also to the supporting characters that die throughout the book.


Review of the audio:
Genevieve Kaplan does an okay job at narrating the book. There were times where I felt like she rushed the words and I thought I was listening at 1.25x speed, but she would usually even herself back out within a few minutes. Her character voices were distinctive and I never had a hard time trying to decipher who was speaking.

Final Thoughts:
– Overall, the book was pretty good and I would recommend it to anyone interested in dystopian sci-fi. I will continue the series to see what happens to the group.

  • The Barrier Between

  • Collector, Book 2
  • By: Stacey Marie Brown
  • Narrated by: Amy Landon
  • Length: 10 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 580
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 538
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 533

Zoey's life has taken a dramatic turn. Only a few months ago, she was a Collector working for the secret part of the government called the Department of Molecular Genetics (DMG), tracking and collecting fae. Her life had been changing and improving, with a partner she loved and a sister she adored. Now all that is gone - Daniel murdered by a fae, and Lexi killed when the Seattle area was devastated by a powerful, magical electrical storm.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • PLEASE MORE

  • By Kindle Customer on 05-05-16

Love this series!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-17

Overall:
So I’m actually having to go back and skim over the books as I write the reviews because I blew through them so quickly. I have not been his obsessed with a series since starting ACOTAR/ACOMAF. I wasn’t going to write a review for the last 3 books because all of them are running together, but I feel like I owe these books my attention, lol. These books are not very well known (only 168 reviews on Goodreads for this one) and I feel like more people should know about them. I’m just going to do mini reviews on them though. The genre is a mixture between Urban Fantasy, New Adult, and Paranormal Romance. It’s not all about the romance, but it’s definitely in there.

The second books picks up with Zoey and Ryker in Peru after Zoey jumps them there to escape the DMG hunters at the end of book one. Almost all of book two takes place in Peru, which is a nice change of scenery from Seattle. Ryker and Zoey continue to try and find a way to transfer Ryker’s powers back to him, but run into some trouble as the powers begin to adapt to Zoey.

-We meet a new character, a sexy fae pirate named Croygen *swoons*. I absolutely adore his character because of his heavy snark and sense of humor, I’m always a sucker for someone who can make me laugh. You’re not sure whether you can trust him or not in the beginning, but he begins to grow on you.
-Ugh Amara is back. I knew I wouldn’t like her because I’m totally team Zoey and Ryker, but even without that she’s a stone cold B. One of my least favorite characters in any series. Ever. What she does to Zoey and Ryker at the end of this book made me want to reach through my phone and punch her in the face.
-And of course Sprig is still here. His character is a great comic relief and works in bringing Zoey and Ryker closer.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"I watched his eyes move up my figure. My skin tingled every place they went. Then his eyes landed back on mine. Desire charged his expression."
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Okay, now let’s discuss Zoey and Ryker’s relationship. The tension between the two was building in book 1, but finally developed in The Barrier Between. The scenes between them: πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯! I love that Ryker and Zoey’s relationship was not insta-love. Their relationship has been a slow burn from hating one another to what it develops into in this book over a period of weeks. I know “weeks doesn’t seem like a long time”. It is though when you’re with someone 24/7. I also appreciated the inner turmoil Zoey had about Ryker having a girlfriend. I’m devastatingly loyal so I have a hard time connecting with people who cheat. It was made pretty clear in this book though that Ryker and Amara’s “relationship” was not one of love, but more sex and convenience (at least for him).

Without revealing too much, we get to see the bad A Zoey that we heard about in City in Embers. Zoey gets tangled up in a fighting ring and we finally see the ruthlessness and cold fury that lives within her. I loved seeing this untamed side of her, as it has only been hinted at until this point. I really love kick A females so Zoey climbed near the top of my favorite female protagonists in this book.

Additional Notes:
– This is where I stress that the book is not YA. It’s New Adult due to the sexual content and the language. I have a terrible mouth on me (I was a sailor after-all) so swearing doesn’t even phase me. However, if you don’t like it – I would stay away from this series. It doesn’t distract from the story though, but rather adds to it IMO.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • City in Embers

  • Collector Series, Book 1
  • By: Stacey Marie Brown
  • Narrated by: Amy Landon
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 819
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 755
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 759

Zoey Daniels has been tossed from foster home to foster home, where she grows up fast and tough. When she is placed in her "last chance" home, she finds a reason to stay and turn her life around: her foster sister, Lexie, who is paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair. After high school, Zoey is hired by a special government agency, the Department of Molecular Genetics (DMG), where she meets the other reason to remain: Daniel, her coworker. The man she loves. But there is something unique about Zoey.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • a totally enthralling budding romance

  • By AudioBook Reviewer on 12-30-16

Really great NA Urban Fantasy!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-17

Overall Assessment:
Y’all. I am in love with this series. I’ve actually owned this audiobook for over a year because I bought it on impulse, but never got around to reading/listening to it. I’ve been reading a little more romance lately and wanted something that wasn’t quite YA, and not quite PNR either. I read the reviews on this one and it seemed to be a happy medium.

The description pretty much tells what the plot is without me having to further delve into it. Overall, the story moves quick. The audiobook is about 11 hours long and not once did I get bored. The first chapter draws you in as you meet our main protagonist, Zoey, and get introduced to her world.

About Zoey – she is tough, and not the kind of tough where the author just tells you about it, but you never see any evidence of it in the story. Zoey is not only a formidable fighter, but she also possesses a mental hardiness and resilience that she acquired from bouncing around foster homes the better part of her life.

And Ryker—sighs dreamily. He is described as a Viking, so naturally I just picture Ragnar from the TV show Vikings. Ryker starts out as kind of an asshole, but you can tell there is a squishy center under all the brooding. I know, this sounds like another case of the “bad guy becomes good” trope, but it is done really well. It’s a very slow transition for him, and he’s not quite a “good” guy, just complex.

The chemistry between Ryker and Zoey is great. It’s definitely going to turn into a romance in the following books, but it’s a verrrrryyyy slow burn. They pretty much bicker the majority of this book, but it’s laugh out loud funny at times. I found myself grinning like a fool several times while listening.

What I liked:
– Strong female protagonist!
– The build up to an epic romance between Zoey and Ryker.
– Sprig, the lovable little monkey sprite. There were times i wanted to ring his adorable little neck because of the “moments” he accidentally broke up, but he adds some extra comedy to a sometimes dark story.
– Brown does a great job at getting you attached very early to supporting characters. I won’t say anything else about that because of spoilers, but lets just say I may or may not have been crying by chapter 3.

What I didn’t like:
– I really can’t think of anything I didn’t like.

Final Thoughts:
– It ends on kind of a cliffhanger, but you learn a major plot development point right before the end. Plus the next book is already out, so quit complaining about it πŸ˜‰

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Empire of Storms

  • By: Sarah J. Maas
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Evans
  • Length: 25 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5,610
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,165
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,168

The long path to the throne has only just begun for Aelin Galathynius. Loyalties have been broken and bought, friends have been lost and gained, and those who possess magic find themselves at odds with those don't. As the kingdoms of Erilea fracture around her, enemies must become allies if Aelin is to keep those she loves from falling to the dark forces poised to claim her world. With war looming on all horizons, the only chance for salvation lies in a desperate quest that may mark the end of everything Aelin holds dear.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Emotional, Stressful and Wonderful

  • By Claudia H on 09-13-16

Not my favorite in the ToG Series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-16-17

***Full Review on my blog: Chanda Reads dot Com****

Overall:
The book starts from Elena’s POV and right way we know that Elena probably did something really terrible and it will negatively affect our beloved group.

I’m not going to do a big summary of the plot, but a few key points are happening:

-The group is spread out each accomplishing their own missions and come together in the end.
-Aelin is looking for the second and third Wyrd Keys.
-Aelin goes back to Terrasen and doesn’t get quite what she expected.
-Erawan continues to be evil.
-Aelin is making plans (behind everyone’s back, *grumble grumble*, see my complaints below) and gathering her army.
-Maeve and her blood sworn Fae continue to be a threat.
-We see several characters from The Assassin’s Blade again. If you have not read the prequels, read them before reading EoS.
-A big reveal on how the keys will be used.
-A huge world shifting battle ensues at the end.

One more thing, the book shifted from YA to NA in this book. There were a few (3 I think?) very steamy scenes. *fans self* DORIAN THOUGH. Keep that in mind if that’s not your thing.

I have said that QoS was my least favorite in the series, but this one almost surpassed it as being my least favorite. The only thing that kept it from being that way was the ending. While definitely not a “happy” ending, it was pretty epic and unexpected. It didn’t completely redeem the book, as Aeilin’s own arrogance (one of my biggest problems with this book) was to blame for the entire event. I’ll go into that a little bit more at the bottom under my “didn’t likes”.



What I liked:
– Elide is my new favorite character in this series. I loved how tenacious she is! She’s also intelligent and witty. The way she had Lorcan wrapped around her finger killed me. Elide is kick a** and I can’t wait to see more of her. I’m shipping her and Lorcan pretty hard so I’m hoping they work out all the stuff that happened at the end, but I have faith they will.
– Manon, as always was perfect. Manon’s character development in this book was exponential. She is finally beginning to think for herself rather than beleive all the lies her grandmother has been shoving down her throat for the last 116 years. Her twist is awesome, but not all that unexpected.
– Aedion’s dad (Gavriel) comes to Erilea for an ominous purpose, but sticks around long enough for the reader to get to know him a little better. His companion, Fenrys, is part of Rowan’s old Cadre (one of the wolves). Fenrys is another of my new favorites. I’m predicting him to have a major role in the next book with Aelin, but IDK how it will turn out for him. πŸ™
– Overall, the story was good. It got a little slow in some parts, but it was a really long book so I kind of expected it.

What I didn’t:
– FFS…..Aelin. Girlfriend. We have to talk about your attitude. Two things made me almost rate this book as 3 stars. :

1. Aelin’s unwarranted distrust to her court. Okay, so Rowan has given her the blood oath and Aedion has pledged his life for not only her but also Terrasen. But she can’t let them in on any of her plans. Why? Because she doesn’t want to “disappoint them”. What. So rather than disappoint them, she continues to hurt them by not entrusting them with her plans?…Oh, and because she didn’t trust anyone, it’s her own damn fault she

SPOILER——---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------->
was caught by Maeve. Yes, Lorcan betrayed her, but he was fearing for Elide’s safety by sending out that signal. Had she not been so damn arrogant and actually fucking told someone that she knew the people on the beach she could have prevented Lorcan sending out that beacon to Maeve. <—---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------—–End of Spoiler.


2. Aelin’s arrogance. OH MY GOD. She has always had some arrogance and a swagger, but it was out of control in Eos. Aelin said she didn’t want to disappoint her court by not telling them her plans, but I think that was only part of it. She liked to see the look in everyone’s eye when they found out how “clever, cunning, blah, blah, blah” she was. She is so arrogant that she believes she is the only one who can strategize, plan, and build an army. Oh wait, SHE HAS A GENERAL AND AN EFFING WARRIOR AT HER SIDE. But Aelin knows best, right? *eyeroll* I really really hope that Aelin is humbled by the events at the end and wakes the hell up. I can’t take her insufferable arrogance for another book.


– No Chaol. :( After SJM butchered his character in QoS, maybe this was a good thing. We are getting an entire book from his POV next though so I’m holding out hope that she can save his character. Maybe make him hook up with Yrene from the Assassin’s Blade? I am not really a fan of Nesryn. I don’t think she’s good enough for my boo.



Additional Notes:
– READ THE PREQUELS. Trust me, it’s worth it.