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Jerry

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Girls Like Us audiobook cover art
  • Girls Like Us
  • Fighting for a World Where Girls Are Not for Sale, an Activist Finds Her Calling and Heals Herself
  • By: Rachel Lloyd
  • Narrated by: Rachel Lloyd

loved it. awesome narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-18

A few years ago I would have put a book like this down and run away, refusing to allow myself so much exposure to the underbelly of human nature. But now that I have the courage to face it, I am richly rewarded with a tale of inspiration, courage and transcendance. Thank you Rachel Lloyd. You have lived, written, and performed a story that rips the blinders off any who have a large enough heart to follow you to the depths and heights of humanity.

What Were You Thinking? audiobook cover art

Awesome examples, some education

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-18

I love this series, loaded with fabulous interviews and in depth examples of kids led astray by their unformed brains. But I already knew that kids do crazy things. I know I did. These interviews entertained with in-depth examples. I thought the biggest value of these stories was the interspersed neurology research. I would have liked more of that. Having said that, I loved the posts and hope to see more.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

The Biology of Desire audiobook cover art

Awesome indepth look at neurology of desire

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-17

Any additional comments?

I have been learning for years about the stunning advances in understanding how the brain works, for example, learning how the brain is influenced by emotional trauma and then creates extreme reactions (PTSD) That's important and good to know. But the research and synthesis presented in this book is what I've been waiting for, an explanation of the drives and compulsions that seem to be stronger than willpower. We all have them. Too much food. Nah, I don't feel like going to the gym. And then of course there are the serious addictions that are ripping up society. This book breaks down the biology of desire in a way that is understandable to the well informed person who is interested in trying to make sense of the important workings of the gray blob behind our eyes. I loved the way he detailed the pathways of thought that interrupt and oversee impulses. One of the best takeaways was the breakdown of desire into its seeking component and the actual pleasure - and how nature has much more interest in getting us to do the seeking (it's easy to see this in addictions - that the seeking behavior takes over the mind with an almost violent control - just as nature would want), and his ending with a call toi mproving one's narrative, showing off the new hidden-but-gradually-becoming-better-respected method of Story that is needed by the prefrontal cortex in order to keep reins over desires.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

Funny in Farsi audiobook cover art

The melting pot, next generation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-08

I am on a quest to read memoirs, and my search through Audible turned up this one, which I had not heard of before, but based on the blurb, thought it would be interesting. I met my first Persian in 1965, a fellow student at the University of Wisconsin, and when he told me he was Persian, I didn't know where it was, or what it meant. He was a sweet, gentle person, and while I know it was wrong of me to judge an entire nation by this one encounter, his charm certainly disposed me kindly towards his country. Now 40+ years later, I have met my second Persian, and based on my experience listening to this memoir, I am happy to say my first impression was correct. Firoozeh's voice and story make me feel like I know her, and share her experience. And I see in her story an updated version of what it must have been like for my own grandparents to come here from a foreign land, and try to make their way in the cauldron of America.

While her humor is often not "laugh out loud" it was "funny" in the sense of irony, observation of the misunderstandings that take place between people of different origins. And frankly, one of the best things about it was to remind me that people, underneath the cloaks of different names and accents, are actually the same. Laughter is a great reminder of that universal connection.

34 of 35 people found this review helpful