LISTENER

Amazon Customer

VA, USA
  • 11
  • reviews
  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 13
  • ratings
  • The Creed

  • Professing the Faith Through the Ages
  • By: Scott Hahn
  • Narrated by: Scott Hahn
  • Length: 4 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 164
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 139
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 136

Why were the early Christians willing to die rather than change a single iota of the creed? Why have the Judeans, Romans, and Persians - among others - seen the Christian creed as a threat to the established social order? In The Creed: Professing the Faith Through the Ages, best-selling author Dr. Scott Hahn recovers and conveys the creed's revolutionary character.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Approachable, detailed and enlightening

  • By Kindle Customer on 04-05-17

Light on history, great on doctrine/presentation

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-22-19

A great introduction to the traditional Christian creeds, and some historical context. Probably ideal for someone who heard the cterds growing up but never had their depth explained.

I was hoping for more of the story of how the creeds came to be in a historical sense, but I still greatly enjoyed listening to Dr. Hahn.

Even when his writing didn't quite align with my expectations, I still felt like it was worth my while to listen.

  • The Catholic Church: A History

  • By: William R. Cook, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: William R. Cook
  • Length: 19 hrs and 13 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 715
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 663
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 661

How did the Catholic Church become one of the most influential institutions in the world-a force capable of moving armies, inspiring saints, and shaping the lives of a billion members? Explore these and other questions as you follow the development of this important institution in 36 informative, fascinating lectures. With Professor Cook by your side, you'll step into the world of the early church, witness the spread of Christendom, and learn about the origins of fundamental church institutions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thorough history presented in a compelling manner

  • By P. Johnson on 01-21-14

Great presentation of a selective history

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-18-19

Our lecturer, an Episcopal convert to Catholicism, presents an abbreviated and somewhat selective history of Catholicism. I was disappointed with the light gloss given to the early days and subsequent centuries of the church. Clearly, it is assumed the listener was raised a Christian, or is very familiar with the faith. Some of the first disappointing moments: a skeptical view of the historicity of the Gospels, barely any mention of early Church Father's writings or extra-scriptural sources on the early church, and the argument that there is strong evidence the early church greatly varied in its essential doctrines from place to place. This sets up his framework for the argument of a church somewhat feeling it's way through history, often blundering quite badly on its way towards Vatican 2, which our narrator sees as the light at the end of a long tunnel. Much of the lectures focus on the middle ages, Protestant Reformation, and modern era, and there are some insights to be gained. Perhaps one of the most frustrating lectures focuses on Papal Infallibility: there is barely any attempt to trace the ancient origins of the belief; the casual listener is going to think the church basically invented the concept in the Middle Ages and cherry-picked some Scripture verses to support it.
The best treatments are often of the various monastic orders in the church. He spends some time on many of them.
I suppose at best one could indeed only claim for this to be "a history". It is by no means an undisputed view on church history. Some sections feel downright intellectually dishonest.
It's entertaining and simplistic, with a decent amount of anecdotes and humor. But an honest, scholarly attempt to provide a broad history of the Catholic Church this is not.

  • The Prince and the Pauper

  • By: Mark Twain
  • Narrated by: Chris Hendrie
  • Length: 7 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21

A classic from Mark Twain. Two boys (one a prince, the other a pauper) exchange identities, and each finds a great learning adventure in Henry VIII’s England. Veteran actor Chris Hendrie brings the vivid characters to life with the insight and humor that only Twain’s genius can inspire.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Classic tale. Unimpressive narration

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-02-18

Classic tale. Unimpressive narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-18

A classic. The narrator often confuses who is talking, and this makes myriad of accents and characterizations a distraction more than an asset.

  • The Fourth Cup

  • Unveiling the Mystery of the Last Supper and the Cross
  • By: Scott Hahn
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 4 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 231
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 206
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 207

Well-known Catholic theologian Dr. Scott Hahn explains Christ's Paschal sacrifice on the cross as the fulfillment of the traditional fourth cup used in the celebration of Passover, drawing symbolic parallels to the Last Supper and Christ's death on Calvary. Through his scholarly insights and important biblical connections, Mass will come alive for you as never before!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Solid study

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-19-18

Make this the book you read this Lent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-25-18

Accessible to anyone familiar with Christianity, utterly satisfying, yet leaving the door open for further exploration, this book is an absolute must. Catholics and Protestants alike can appreciate this book.

If you've previously read Dr. Scott Hahn's words about the fourth cup, do not use that as an excuse to skip this book, as it offers a multitude of insights found no where else in his works on the topic, and of course he can't help himself, but ties this topic into so many others.

The last chapter of this book is fantastic. Don't be the kind of person to read the first couple chapters, get the gist of where he is heading, and move on to other things. This book builds, so grow along with it. God bless!

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Bearing False Witness

  • Debunking Centuries of Anti-Catholic History
  • By: Rodney Stark
  • Narrated by: Paul Boehmer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 211
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 196
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 192

As we all know, and as many of our well-established textbooks have argued for decades, the Inquisition was one of the most frightening and bloody chapters in Western history, Pope Pius XII was anti-Semitic and rightfully called "Hitler's Pope", the Dark Ages were a stunting of the progress of knowledge to be redeemed only by the secular spirit of the Enlightenment, and the religious Crusades were an early example of the rapacious Western thirst for riches and power. But what if these long-held beliefs were all wrong?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enlightening

  • By jjdoctor on 12-10-16

A Mostly-Compelling Work to Restore History

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-18

The audiobook quality itself is excellent. Great narrator. For those who cannot trust Roman Catholics scholarly works themselves, this Protestant-minded work does much to undo the rampant exaggerations and lies that have cropped up against the Roman Catholic Church in the past few centuries. Some of you will need to hear this sitting down...

As a Catholic who has read much on many of these topics, I was disappointed that at times the author seemed to fall back upon Protestant myths in order to paint what he thought was a complete picture of the Catholic Church at various points in history. At other times, like with his explanation of the issue involving Galileo and the church, it seemed that he had not read much more comprehensive, contemporary works on the subject. Perhaps he was just being cautious. Or avoiding Catholic scholarship.

However, the overwhelming majority of this book seems to be good secular/protestant scholarship with credible sources to back his often shocking claims (especially if one was raised protestant and/or attended secular schools). His writing on some of the most controversial topics is his best.

There are better books on the topic, but if you can't bring yourself to read Catholic scholars yet, start here. This book might blow your mind. And help you better understand the history of the west. And, I hope, help you to see that Catholocism isn't the wicked institution that so many still make it out to be.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Life Is Worth Living, Part 1

  • By: Archbishop Fulton J Sheen
  • Narrated by: Fulton J. Sheen
  • Length: 9 hrs and 32 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 211
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 188
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 186

Here is the best of the audio from the famous Catholic television program, "Life is Worth Living!" For more than 30 years, Archbishop Fulton Sheen was the voice of the Catholic Church, with his radio and television ministries that touched hearts all over the world. His wisdom and gentle insight are once again available in digitally remastered audio recorded from his live programs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing audiobook!!!!

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-03-14

A compelling conversation on Christianity

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-04-18

Bishop Sheen is at his finest- candid, personable, dramatic, reasonable, at times rhetorical.

Starting simply with human reason, Bishop Sheen begins to reveal what we can know about God and about ourselves.

There is some dated language, and not every pitch is a strike, but for those who gave up on the faith or never really considered it, this may get you started on the greatest journey you could ever hope for: the quest for meaning, the quest for proof that life is worth living, and the growing hope that life can be found in our Lord Jesus Christ.

  • Jesus and the Jewish Roots of the Eucharist

  • Unlocking the Secrets of the Last Supper
  • By: Brant Pitre, Scott Hahn - foreword
  • Narrated by: David Cochran Heath
  • Length: 6 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 194
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 173

In recent years, Christians everywhere are rediscovering the Jewish roots of their faith. Every year at Easter time, many believers now celebrate Passover meals (known as Seders) seeking to understand exactly what happened at Jesus' final Passover, the night before he was crucified. Jesus and the Jewish Roots of the Eucharist shines fresh light on the Last Supper by looking at it through Jewish eyes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow you're missing out

  • By Practical opinionaire on 06-27-17

fantastic all around

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-17

I listened to this on a business trip, and like the disciples on the road with Jesus after the resurrection, my heart was burning within me. This book absolutely accomplishes what it sets out to do, and quite convincingly at that. I recommend this to anyone who wants to know more about the real presence of Christ, and the Jewish roots of the Eucharist. This book is simply fantastic. Excellent narration too.

  • The Case for Jesus

  • The Biblical and Historical Evidence for Christ
  • By: Brant Pitre, Robert Barron - afterword
  • Narrated by: Mark Deakins
  • Length: 7 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 525
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 472
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 468

Over the past hundred years, scholars have attacked the historical truth of the Gospels and argued that they were originally anonymous and filled with contradictions. In The Case for Jesus, Brant Pitre taps in to the wells of Christian scripture, history, and tradition to ask and answer a number of different questions, including: If we don't know who wrote the Gospels, how can we trust them? How are the four Gospels different from other Gospels, such as the lost Gospel of "Q" and the Gospel of Thomas?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Pitre Debunks Bart Ehrman

  • By Dominic Vahling on 08-07-16

For the honest skeptic or believer

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-17

"Did Jesus ever actually claim to be devine? Are the Gospels to be taken seriously? Who wrote them? When?"

This book is simply fantastic. It is definitely an apologist's work, but I do not find the authors splitting hairs or trying to ram certain information down one's throat. Extensive research was clearly done, and one could find a lot of additional information very easily thanks to the authors' generous sharing of other scholars' knowledge (on both sides of the issues).

This book is written for anyone who wants to honestly evaluate some of the modern critiques of the four Gospels and assaults on the Church's understanding of who Jesus of Nazareth claimed to be.

An average Joe will find this work compelling, and a scholar will probably leave this book wanting to do some more recommended reading, but with powerful answers to modern objections to the divinity of Christ.

The narrator is the best I've heard on Audible so far; I think he enjoyed the book too!

  • A Father Who Keeps His Promises

  • God's Covenant Love in Scripture
  • By: Scott Hahn
  • Narrated by: Paul Smith
  • Length: 8 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 277
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 224
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 224

In A Father Who Keeps His Promises, the popular Catholic apologist Scott Hahn focuses on the “big picture” of Scripture: God’s plan in making and keeping covenants with us throughout salvation history—despite our faults and shortcomings—so that we might live as the family of God.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome! Explains God's Love and Mercy.

  • By Rosanna on 02-11-13

Read the Bible first, listen to the end

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-17

I think Hahn has written books whose chapters fit together smoother and whose thoughts stay tighter on topic, but the entirety of this work, especially the latter half of the book, is excellent.
Good narration.

  • Church of Spies

  • The Pope's Secret War Against Hitler
  • By: Mark Riebling
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 10 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 288
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 264
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 264

The Vatican's silence in the face of Nazi atrocities remains one of the great controversies of our time. History has accused wartime pontiff Pius the Twelfth of complicity in the Holocaust and dubbed him "Hitler's Pope". But a key part of the story has remained untold. Pius ran the world's largest church, smallest state, and oldest spy service. Saintly but secretive, he skimmed from church charities to pay covert couriers, and surreptitiously tape-recorded his meetings with top Nazis.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Pius XII Vindicated

  • By James Clark on 04-17-16

An incredible story told adequately.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-17

History buffs, Christians and anyone interested in another perspective on Hitler's evil Reich ought to read this book. The history here is so compelling that it practically needs no help from the author.
The narration is adequate; strangely underwhelming.
Given some of the heavy subject matter and dramatic twists and turns, one has to wonder if the narrator forgot his cup of coffee. I suspect the book would have read better with a more emotionally involved narrator. In fairness, depictions of a holocaust may have made it difficult. I'm only mentioning this because occasionally the story's prose itself sounded a bit awkward, but it was hard to discern if the way the narrator was reading the passage was the way the author intended.

No matter, I do not regret purchasing this book.
If you can't read it, listen to it.