LISTENER

Anonymous

  • 2
  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 4
  • ratings
  • The Nature Fix

  • Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative
  • By: Florence Williams
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 8 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 584
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 534
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 528

For centuries, poets and philosophers extolled the benefits of a walk in the woods: Beethoven drew inspiration from rocks and trees; Wordsworth composed while tromping over the heath; Nikola Tesla conceived the electric motor while visiting a park. Intrigued by our storied renewal in the natural world, Florence Williams sets out to uncover the science behind nature's positive effects on the brain.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Yes!...and No!

  • By Paul on 03-18-17

Good primer but lacks depth of explanation

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-21-18

Good overview and performance but lacks depth of scientific enquiry and explanation.. Much more in depth research is needed on a critical topic

  • Go Wild

  • Free Your Body and Mind from the Afflictions of Civilization
  • By: John J. Ratey, Richard Manning, David Perlmutter (foreword)
  • Narrated by: Dan Woren
  • Length: 9 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 383
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 340
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 338

The scientific evidence behind why maintaining a lifestyle more like that of our ancestors will restore our health and well-being. In Go Wild, Harvard Medical School Professor John Ratey, MD, and journalist Richard Manning reveal that although civilization has rapidly evolved, our bodies have not kept pace.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The most civilizing book of your life.

  • By Patrick F. Siebert on 06-01-15

Good summary

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-18

Good summary of the important health issues that we overlook in favour of what people call progress