LISTENER

Mark Baldwin

Maine, USA
  • 4
  • reviews
  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 5
  • ratings
  • Judgment

  • A Novel
  • By: Joseph Finder
  • Narrated by: January LaVoy
  • Length: 10 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 411
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 388
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 385

Juliana Brody, a judge in the Superior Court of Massachusetts, is rumored to be in consideration for the federal circuit, maybe someday the highest court in the land. At a conference in a Chicago hotel, she meets a gentle, vulnerable man and has an unforgettable night with him - something she’d never done before. They part with an explicit understanding that this must never happen again. But back home in Boston, Juliana realizes this was no random encounter. The man from Chicago proves to have an integral role in a case she's presiding over....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Secrets buried in secrets!!!!

  • By shelley on 02-01-19

Critics thought this was good ???

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-19

This book should be a textbook in a crime writing class. It's plot cliches can be numbered by the page. The heroine, who is described as smart, is dumb as a bag of hammers, and less interesting. Listen to it if you like to root for the forces of evil, no matter how boring, or if you have an overdeveloped love of parody. It is bad, and probably destined for the screen.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Sun Is God

  • By: Adrian McKinty
  • Narrated by: Gerard Doyle
  • Length: 7 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 458
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 403
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 402

Colonial New Guinea, 1906: A small group of mostly German nudists lives an extreme back-to-nature existence on the remote island of Kabakon. Eating only coconuts and bananas, they purport to worship the sun. One of their members, Max Lutzow, has recently died, allegedly from malaria. But an autopsy on his body in the nearby capital of Herbertshöhe raises suspicions about foul play.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating! McKinty always blows my socks off.

  • By 6catz on 01-12-15

Longest wrap up in the biz

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-14-17

McKinty is good. He's written memorable descriptions such as Molotov cocktails in the Belfast night "paying homage to the god of curves." But he also can over over over-do the tedious trope of stretching stretching stretching-out suspense. The Perils of Pauline have nothing on McKinty. Fortunately this usually happens almost at the end of the book.
The reading of all of his books is first rate.

  • A Hero of France

  • By: Alan Furst
  • Narrated by: Daniel Gerroll
  • Length: 8 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 556
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 501
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 496

Alan Furst's latest novel takes place in the secret hotels, nightclubs, and cafes of occupied Paris and the villages of France during the spring of 1941, when Britain was losing the war. Many of the characters are resistance fighters who run an escape line for British airmen down to Spain; they include men and women, old and young, all strong - an aristocrat, a Jewish teacher - and the hero is a hero, has a gun, and uses it.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing

  • By David Holroyd on 06-12-16

Poor Alan

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-16

Mr. Furst is in a terrible bind. He is one of the best writers never to have a movie made, as far as I know. His last couple of books show an effort to convince the moguls with coy sex and happy endings. If you want to see rainy cobblestones and smell wet wool overcoats and the sweet steam of locomotives, and live with the complicated darkness of the late thirties, read his first books and send him a few bucks.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Wolf Hall

  • By: Hilary Mantel
  • Narrated by: Simon Slater
  • Length: 24 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,922
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,990
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,997

In the ruthless arena of King Henry VIII's court, only one man dares to gamble his life to win the king's favor and ascend to the heights of political powerEngland in the 1520s is a heartbeat from disaster. If the king dies without a male heir, the country could be destroyed by civil war. Henry VIII wants to annul his marriage of twenty years, and marry Anne Boleyn.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Divorced, beheaded, died...

  • By Tim on 09-30-11

How is this a terrible reading?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-15

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

If it were read by Simon Vance, as is Bring Up The Bodies

What was one of the most memorable moments of Wolf Hall?

Being irritated at Simon Slater ruining such a good book.

How could the performance have been better?

See review

What character would you cut from Wolf Hall?

What note would you cut from, say, Beethoven's opus 111?

Any additional comments?

This recording by Simon Slate has been getting rave reviews. Here's my take: it is awful. • The characters are not consistent. True, it is a difficult task for a reader with so many characters to voice, but distinguishing is the reader's job. For example, the distinction is not clear, and is shifty, between the narrator's voice and Cromwell's.• The book is full of distasteful characters. Almost without exception all of them have a smarmy snide sound that Slater yells, "Here is a bad person whom you will be glad to see brought down." It's worse than twirling a pointy mustache. Sometimes the Thomas More or Lord Norfolk voice is still lingering when Slater begins the narrator's voice. (Is that Slater's normal voice?) The whole effect is worse than a fifth-grade declamation contest. It's comical the first few times, but I had to stop listening. Listen to Simon Vance's reading of Hilary Mantel's Bring Up The Bodies. Same characters, mostly, but Vance makes the book a pleasure to hear over and over. Why did Audible drop Slater and bring up Vance? With all respect, they have a better ear than some of the reviewers on this page. Either that or Mantel's agent came down hard on Audible.