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  • DNA Is Not Destiny

  • The Remarkable, Completely Misunderstood Relationship Between You and Your Genes
  • By: Steven J. Heine
  • Narrated by: Stephen R. Thorne
  • Length: 10 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30

Around 250,000 people have had their genomes sequenced, and scientists expect that number to rise to one billion by 2025. Professor Steven J. Heine argues that the first thing we will do on receiving our DNA test results is to misinterpret them completely. Despite breathless (often lightly researched) media coverage about newly discovered "cancer" or "divorce" or "IQ" genes, the prospect of a DNA test forecasting how your life is going to turn out is vanishingly small.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Understanding and Moderating the Hype of Genetics

  • By Falcon69 on 08-23-17

Verbose

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-31-18

I learned a lot from this good and unique book. Switch thinking, genetic essentialism, fatalism, determinism...all concepts that could be explained with much better economy. Author repeats himself in several places throughout book. Cliff notes are in order for anyone not wanting to invest 10+ hours to read.

  • The Big Sort

  • Why the Clustering of Like-Minded America Is Tearing Us Apart
  • By: Bill Bishop, Robert G. Cushing
  • Narrated by: Paul Brion
  • Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 30

In 2004, journalist Bill Bishop coined the term "the big sort". Armed with startling new demographic data, he made national news in a series of articles showing how Americans have been sorting themselves into alarmingly homogeneous communities - not by region or by state but by city and even neighborhood. Over the past three decades, we have been choosing the neighborhoods (and churches and news shows) compatible with our lifestyles and beliefs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Everyone has something to learn from this book

  • By Courtland J Schafer on 02-05-18

Wandering biopic of Boomer politics

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-31-17

I liked the historic, religious, demographic and political sorting anecdotes. I didn't like the use of percentages of change without scope. For example, if votes for LGBT rights doubled then what percentage of all voters did that result in? The book is very long to make a point that could've been made more efficiently with graphics using census and voting data. Every generation may think they have invented sex because they don't discuss it with parents. Sorting isn't new, might be more pronounced thanks to a shrinking world.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful