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Sylvia

Valdosta, GA
  • 66
  • reviews
  • 309
  • helpful votes
  • 264
  • ratings
  • Out of Africa

  • By: Isak Dineson
  • Narrated by: Julie Harris
  • Length: 2 hrs and 57 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 965
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 865
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 865

Danish countess Karen Blixon, known as Isak Dineson, ran a coffee plantation in Kenya in the years when Africa remained a romantic and formidable continent to most Europeans. Out of Africa is her account of her life there, with stories of her respectful relationships with the Masai, Kikuyu, and Somali natives who work on her land; the European friends who visit her; and the imposing permanence of the wild, high land itself.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I did not expect to enjoy this

  • By Tyler Tanner on 10-08-14

Peaceful and interesting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-18

The narration was so genuine-sounding that I kept forgetting that it was not the author reading it. This is a peaceful and interesting story. Though pretty short, and not exciting, the relationships and different lifestyles of an Africa of the past were intriguing.

  • The Hippopotamus Pool

  • The Amelia Peabody Series, Book 8
  • By: Elizabeth Peters
  • Narrated by: Barbara Rosenblat
  • Length: 14 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,338
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 982
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 975

The spunky Victorian Egyptologist Amelia Peabody Emerson has returned to the exotic Nile valley. Parasol aloft and hot on the trail of an unexplored tomb, she must outwit a shadowy evildoer, a questionable antiquities dealer, and her loquacious son, Ramses.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Desert Derring-Do

  • By Kay in DC on 02-03-08

As wonderful as ever!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

Narrator is a master (or mistress) of accents!
Each character is voiced and portrayed differently.
The storyline is always fascinating and mysterious.
The characters age with each succeeding volume in a very believable way.
The only trouble is that the stories end too soon!

  • The Drug Hunters

  • The Improbable Quest to Discover New Medicines
  • By: Donald R. Kirsch PhD, Ogi Ogas PhD
  • Narrated by: James Foster
  • Length: 7 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 972
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 889
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 889

The search to find medicines is as old as disease, which is to say as old as the human race. Through serendipity - by chewing, brewing, and snorting - some Neolithic souls discovered opium, alcohol, snakeroot, juniper, frankincense, and other helpful substances. Ötzi the Iceman, the 5,000-year-old hunter frozen in the Italian Alps, was found to have whipworms in his intestines and Bronze Age medicine, a worm-killing birch fungus, knotted to his leggings.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Aargh!

  • By Curmud the prof on 05-20-17

Extremely interesting!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-18

Except for the fact that the narrator mispronounced certain scientific terms, this was a good book! If you want to know the role of “big pharma” in drug development, this tells it like it is. But better yet, the quirky, lucky incidents of researchers and doctors discovering drugs throughout history are covered too. And the reason the FDA exists is explained. You will be shocked, fascinated and amazed by this book!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Feather Thief

  • Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century
  • By: Kirk Wallace Johnson
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 8 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 490
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 453
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 451

On a cool June evening in 2009, after performing a concert at London's Royal Academy of Music, 20-year-old American flautist Edwin Rist boarded a train for a suburban outpost of the British Museum of Natural History. Home to one of the largest ornithological collections in the world, the Tring museum was full of rare bird specimens whose gorgeous feathers were worth staggering amounts of money to the men who shared Edwin's obsession: the Victorian art of salmon fly-tying. Once inside the museum, the champion fly-tier grabbed hundreds of bird skins - some collected 150 years earlier.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unusual and true natural history mystery!

  • By Sylvia on 04-28-18

Unusual and true natural history mystery!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-18

This is a fascinating book that not only explains about the particular theft of feathers and bird skins, but also about the function of museums and other institutions keeping actual collections of these and why people would want to steal these things. As I said, not just birds but also things like elephant tusks and turtles and all types of animals. The reason I gave the story only four stars is because the detailed theft story began but then diverged off into speaking about all these other topics marginally related to the actual feather theft. Once it got back to the actual feather theft, I was a little confused about who was who and the wheres and whens and so on. But I eventually got back on to the gist of things. Although I have a degree in biology and have both used and contributed to various collections myself, of reptiles/amphibians, not birds, I did not know a good number of things covered by this story. If you have an interest in biology or natural history or ecology or conservation or museums or even just history, I think you would enjoy this audiobook because it is rather unique and presents facts and stories that you may never have heard and relates them together in a way you may not have been aware that they relate. So I have spoken this into my phone rather than typed it and I hope that it makes sense to you. I enjoyed this audiobook. P. S. If you are interested in flyfishing or fly tying, you would probably really, really get into this book!!!

12 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • The Mummy Case

  • The Amelia Peabody Series, Book 3
  • By: Elizabeth Peters
  • Narrated by: Barbara Rosenblat
  • Length: 12 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,894
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,436
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,419

The indomitable Amelia Peabody and her husband, known to many as "the Father of Curses", are into archaeology and mischief again. This third in the series brings the reader once more into Egypt and the shady world of black market antiquities. The winter excavation season has hardly yet begun when Amelia stumbles onto what looks suspiciously like a ring of thieves.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent!

  • By Leanna on 04-20-11

Amusing, clever, intriguing, quirky, and best accents ever!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-18

It’s a mystery. It’s a fun story. Well, people DO get murdered. So it can be creepy too! There are some real cliff-hanger moments.
The characters are outrageous. Eccentric to the nth degree.
The narrator is perfect. Many different accents are required and she performs each one totally convincingly.
I can’t wait for the next book!
The listening experience is so enjoyable that I would not want to try to read it myself. The narrator brings these characters to life!
This book surely must have been fun to write. I hope the author writes MANY more!

  • Jacob T. Marley

  • By: R. William Bennett
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 4 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,486
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,327
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,309

"Marley was dead to begin with...." These chillingly familiar words begin the classic Christmas tale of remorse and redemption in A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Now R. William Bennett rewinds the story and focuses the spotlight on Scrooge’s miserly business partner, Jacob T. Marley, who was allowed to return as a ghost to warn Scrooge away from his ill-fated path. Why was Marley allowed to return? And why hadn’t he been given the same chance as Ebenezer Scrooge? Or had he?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is my favorite book! I listen to it all year

  • By Lyle K Holden on 08-07-17

Amazing and inspirational - couldn’t stop listening!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-17

I spent the last half hour or so of the book crying! It is so touching and wonderful! The author did an excellent job writing what I would call a companion volume to A Christmas Carol by Dickens. The narrator sounded like he was actually there for everything that happened! I highly recommend this book, especially for the holiday season!

  • The Curse of the Pharaohs

  • The Amelia Peabody Series, Book 2
  • By: Elizabeth Peters
  • Narrated by: Barbara Rosenblat
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,576
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,897
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,888

The sun rides high over the British Empire and the light still sparkles brightly in Amelia Peabody's eye as she returns for her second adventure in archaeology and romantic mystery as recounted in her lively journal, The Curse of the Pharaohs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful!

  • By Leanna on 04-20-11

“I had my knife, my gun, my parasol...”

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-08-17

Amelia Peabody is a hoot! There is so much dry humor in many of the things she says. She truly loves her husband and he loves her. And their oddball personalities are portrayed perfectly by the narrator, Barbara Rosenblat (who has an amazing facility with accents and a wide variety of voices so that the characters are easily distinguishable from one another). This is a very good whodunnit. Curses, tombs, dead bodies, Egyptologists, ancient ruins, superstitious desert dwellers, love and adventure in the late nineteenth century...and a staunch woman who uses her trusty parasol as a weapon. This book offers never a dull moment!

  • Crocodile on the Sandbank

  • The Amelia Peabody Series, Book 1
  • By: Elizabeth Peters
  • Narrated by: Barbara Rosenblat
  • Length: 9 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,673
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,337
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,325

Amelia Peabody inherited two things from her father: a considerable fortune and an unbendable will. The first allowed her to indulge in her life's passion. Without the second, the mummy's curse would have made corpses of them all.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Nice break from the usual-

  • By Carrie on 12-18-04

Melodramatic-but in a good way! Does the mummy get the girl?!?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-17

This is written like an old-timey tale about people studying ancient Egyptian tombs around the end of the 19th century. Of course, there’s a mummy that shows up and threatens everyone, and becomes fixated on the young beautiful girl. You don’t know till almost the end if the mummy is real or a person in a disguise and I’m not telling here either! There is romance and adventure and interesting settings and ambience. The characters are very well-developed. There is a lot of suspense all through out the book. Can’t wait to listen to the next one!

  • You're Lucky You're Funny

  • How Life Becomes a Sitcom
  • By: Phil Rosenthal
  • Narrated by: Phil Rosenthal
  • Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 257
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 160
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 159

The creator and executive producer of Everybody Loves Raymond dissects the art of comedy and the making of a sitcom classic. In television, where programs can premiere and disappear in the same week, Everybody Loves Raymond reigned as America's best-loved show for nine years with more than 17 million viewers. As the number-one sitcom, it received more than 70 Emmy nominations, including two wins for best comedy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • For Raymond Lovers

  • By Margaret Campbell on 11-05-06

REALLY FUNNY!!!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-17

If you are a fan of Everybody Loves Raymond, you will LOVE this audiobook!!! Phil Rosenthal is not only very funny, but he, also from Queens (like Ray Romano), talks like Ray! Many of the episodes were based on his (Phil’s) life. Lots of interesting info on all of the characters/actors and on the making of the show. Phil’s life story is darn funny (in his telling of it) and it is integral to understanding and appreciating Everybody Loves Raymond. I will re-listen, probably more than once. The book made me happy!

  • The Lost City of the Monkey God

  • A True Story
  • By: Douglas Preston
  • Narrated by: Bill Mumy
  • Length: 10 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,487
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,157
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,156

Since the days of conquistador Hernán Cortés, rumors have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden somewhere in the Honduran interior, called the White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God. Indigenous tribes speak of ancestors who fled there to escape the Spanish invaders, and they warn that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Danger and Discovery in the Jungle

  • By Jim N on 01-08-17

Interesting, exciting true-life adventure

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-17

The book begins with a detailed history of those who have tried to find or have claimed to try to find the Lost City of the Monkey God. Lots of charlatans out there in history!
Next, it covers the author's experience actually searching for and finding the City, mostly thanks to LIDAR. The detailed descriptions of living in the jungle made me positive beyond any doubt that I NEVER want to go to a tropical jungle!
The last part of the book, I don't want to spoil it, but it deals with the after-effects of the expedition experience and then, the ending, which I did not like and kind of spoiled the book for me, whether appropriate or not, was about the effects of global warming on the possibility of pandemics that could decimate much of the world's population.
That being said, if you like books about unusual people and adventures in tropical jungles, and if you like a little bit of history and science, then you will like this book. I would have given it five stars all the way around except for that downer ending.
The ending was probably appropriate, but I would've preferred to have been left with a sense of wonder rather than with a dose of harsh reality.