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S. Summers

  • 12
  • reviews
  • 24
  • helpful votes
  • 37
  • ratings
  • Good and Mad

  • How Women's Anger Is Reshaping America
  • By: Rebecca Traister
  • Narrated by: Rebecca Traister
  • Length: 9 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 142
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 128
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 128

In the year 2018, it seems as if women’s anger has suddenly erupted into the public conversation. But long before this, women’s anger was not only politically catalytic - but politically problematic. With eloquence and fervor, Rebecca tracks the history of female anger as political fuel - from suffragettes chaining themselves to the White House to office workers vacating their buildings after Clarence Thomas was confirmed to the Supreme Court. She deconstructs society’s (and the media’s) condemnation of female emotion (notably, rage) and the impact of resulting repercussions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The perfect book for October 2018.

  • By Kate Willette on 10-03-18

I have been waiting for a book like this

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-18

A text for women of all ages and those who love them, Traister's words are insightful and incisive. They are a clear-eyed affirmation of the righteous indignation most women are feeling now. She gives it context both historically and presently, blowing away the gaslighting of the last 40 years.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Eichmann in Jerusalem

  • A Report on the Banality of Evil
  • By: Hannah Arendt
  • Narrated by: Wanda McCaddon
  • Length: 11 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 386
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 346
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 344

Sparking a flurry of heated debate, Hannah Arendt's authoritative and stunning report on the trial of German Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann first appeared in The New Yorker in 1963. This revised edition includes material that came to light after the trial, as well as Arendt's postscript. A major journalistic triumph by an intellectual of singular influence, Eichmann in Jerusalem is as shocking as it is informative - an unflinching look at one of the most unsettling (and unsettled) issues of the 20th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lest we forget the banality of evil

  • By BryinSiam on 08-03-14

Necessary for Our Times

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-18

A keen, observant account of how thoroughly the human mind can set aside its conscience within a system designed to do it.

  • Enlightenment Now

  • The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress
  • By: Steven Pinker
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 19 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,301
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,944
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,910

Is the world really falling apart? Is the ideal of progress obsolete? In this elegant assessment of the human condition in the third millennium, cognitive scientist and public intellectual Steven Pinker urges us to step back from the gory headlines and prophecies of doom, which play to our psychological biases. Instead, follow the data: Pinker shows that life, health, prosperity, safety, peace, knowledge, and happiness are on the rise, not just in the West but worldwide.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • We live in the best of all times

  • By Neuron on 02-25-18

Oxygen for Our times

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-09-18

If you appreciated Pinker's Better Angels of Our Nature, you will likely appreciate this one for many of the same reasons. I was not expecting such a forceful defense against pessimism. That was an added bonus that we sorely need right now.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Trumpocracy

  • The Corruption of the American Republic
  • By: David Frum
  • Narrated by: David Frum, James Anderson Foster
  • Length: 7 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 898
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 796
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 790

Best-selling author, former White House speechwriter, and Atlantic columnist and media commentator David Frum explains why President Trump has undermined our most important institutions in ways even the most critical media has missed, in this thoughtful and hard-hitting book that is a warning for democracy and America's future. Quietly, steadily, Trump and his administration are damaging the tenets and accepted practices of American democracy, perhaps irrevocably.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I'm a liberal, buuuut.....

  • By EbonKrowne on 04-02-18

Excellent Analysis

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-10-18

Reading this book reminds me of not so distant days when Republicans and Democrats could respectfully disagree and value the other's opinion. Though David Frum holds ideas on tax reform, corporate regulation, and other such issue that I strenuously disagree with, I have always appreciated his brilliant, sober intellect. Since the rise of Trump, Frum has been a steady voice in so much noise, reminding us of the bedrock, essential American values we need to protect. On those foundational issues, he is firmly and courageously committed. This book delineates those values from the noise around us, reminding us of what we have to lose. However, the last chapter is surprisingly optimistic. I am grateful for that.

8 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • The Once and Future Liberal

  • After Identity Politics
  • By: Mark Lilla
  • Narrated by: Charles Constant
  • Length: 2 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 203

From one of the country's most admired political thinkers, an urgent wake-up call to American liberals to turn from the divisive politics of identity and develop a vision of our future that can persuade all citizens that they share a common destiny.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant and Painfully True

  • By David Larson on 09-01-17

Necessary Analysis

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-18

Once and Future Liberal offers an accurate diagnosis of the current state of affairs. I have myself lamented what now passes for citizenship.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Second Coming of the KKK

  • The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition
  • By: Linda Gordon
  • Narrated by: Jo Anna Perrin
  • Length: 7 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 42
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42

By legitimizing bigotry and redefining so-called American values, a revived Klan in the 1920s left a toxic legacy that demands reexamination today. Boasting four to six million members, the reassembled Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s dramatically challenged our preconceptions of hooded Klansmen, who through violence and lynching had established a Jim Crow racial hierarchy in the 1870s South.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Necessary History

  • By S. Summers on 01-29-18

Necessary History

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-29-18

This text sheds light on a recent period of American history that still echoes in our present more than most what to believe.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • We Were Eight Years in Power

  • An American Tragedy
  • By: Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • Narrated by: Beresford Bennett
  • Length: 13 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,483
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,332
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,321

"We were eight years in power" was the lament of Reconstruction-era black politicians as the American experiment in multiracial democracy ended with the return of white supremacist rule in the South. Now Ta-Nehisi Coates explores the tragic echoes of that history in our own time: the unprecedented election of a black president followed by a vicious backlash that fueled the election of the man Coates argues is America's "first white president".

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Repackaged Atlantic Articles, but worth reading

  • By Adam Shields on 10-04-17

Gripping and Unflinching

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-06-17

As with all of his writing, Ta-Nehisi Coates takes American mythological notions of ourselves and our interpretations of what we have created and shows us the more intellectually honest way to see the events before us.

  • The All New Don't Think of an Elephant!

  • Know Your Values and Frame the Debate
  • By: George Lakoff
  • Narrated by: Chris Sorenson
  • Length: 6 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 217
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 192
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 190

Completely revised and updated to tackle today’s issues, the 10th Anniversary Edition not only explains what framing is and how it works but also reveals why, after a brief stint of winning the framing wars in the 2008 elections, the Democrats have gone back to losing them, and what can be done about it. In this powerful new volume, George Lakoff delves into the issues that will dominate the midterm elections in 2014, the coming presidential elections, and beyond.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Nice book, shitty narrator voice

  • By Mohammad Mneimneh on 01-22-17

Indispensable Reading

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-17

This ia a how-to manual on how to communicate the most important American ideas and ideals.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Being Human: Life Lessons from the Frontiers of Science

  • By: Robert Sapolsky, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: The Great Courses
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,119
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 985
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 979

Understanding our humanity - the essence of who we are - is one of the deepest mysteries and biggest challenges in modern science. Why do we have bad moods? Why are we capable of having such strange dreams? How can metaphors in our language hold such sway on our actions? As we learn more about the mechanisms of human behavior through evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, and other related fields, we're discovering just how intriguing the human species is.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Human And Loving It!

  • By Gillian on 07-28-15

Fascinating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-11-16

Once again, the Great Courses series does not disappoint. This is a lecture series, not a narrative, nor is it intended to be a graduate course in neurobiology. It appeals to those with curiosity about the subject, but don't want to comb through a medical journal to get the information.

  • Moral Tribes

  • Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them
  • By: Joshua Greene
  • Narrated by: Mel Foster
  • Length: 14 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 471
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 392
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 393

A pathbreaking neuroscientist reveals how our social instincts turn Me into Us, but turn Us against Them - and what we can do about it. The great dilemma of our shrinking world is simple: never before have those we disagree with been so present in our lives. The more globalization dissolves national borders, the more clearly we see that human beings are deeply divided on moral lines - about everything from tax codes to sexual practices to energy consumption - and that, when we really disagree, our emotions turn positively tribal.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Exceedingly Interesting...

  • By Douglas on 01-29-14

A well-stated popularization of Utilitarianism

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-16

I have long awaited an updated "translation " of Utilitarianism for a globalized world. If your are looking for an academic version, this is not it. If you struggle with the question, "Can't we all just get along, this is a readily accessible distillation of a likely way to accomplish that goal.

The narration is superb.