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  • 6
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  • Evan Help Us

  • By: Rhys Bowen
  • Narrated by: Roger Clark
  • Length: 6 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 646
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 605
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 603

Evan Evans is settling into his role as Constable of Llanfair, a small town nestled in the mountains of North Wales. Here, he has been a mediator of the minor disputes of the locals, between competing ministers, country merchants, and seemingly every Welch eccentric throughout the region. But an unusual series of events brings unseen hostilities to light, and Evan realizes just how deep the townsfolk's passions and hostilities lie.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Engaging story

  • By KerryL on 02-06-17

A mouthful of fun.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-17

If you like "visiting" unique parts of the world and plugging in to the local lore, this series is for you. Evan Evans is the constable of Llanfair, a bucolic valley village in Wales. Everyone is named Evans and called by their professions, i.e. The constable is know as Evans the Law. Evans the Meat is the butcher and chief murder suspect in this charming story which involves the deaths of two outsiders within 24 hours. The village charm is made vivid by the expert narrator, Roger Clark, who impresses with his ability to pronounce Welch names of Record-setting length. Treat yourself.

  • Dead Ground in Between

  • By: Maureen Jennings
  • Narrated by: Roger Clark
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 8

It's late 1942; World War II is still raging. Detective Inspector Tom Tyler is settling into his placement in Ludlow, Shropshire, a small town jammed with people sent there by the conflict. On the outskirts is an Italian PoW camp. Tyler's job is both to keep the peace and to enforce wartime regulations. Then a troubled old man goes missing in a winter storm. The next day his body is discovered in a secret hideout supposedly known to very few. It soon becomes clear that a crime has been committed, and there is no shortage of suspects.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • very good story

  • By Anonymous User on 05-01-18

History and mystery

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-17

Roger Clark's mesmerizing narration has kept me waiting for the next Tom Tyler mystery from Maureen Jennings. This book, set in WWII England, did not disappoint. It combines two eras of English history with a romantic turn for the star detective. Clark's sonorous tones and subtle shifts of emphasis to differentiate between characters, including two children and an Italian prisoner of war, produce a professional audio experience about the discovery of old coins. Bravo, and thanks.

  • The Underground Railroad (Oprah's Book Club)

  • By: Colson Whitehead
  • Narrated by: Bahni Turpin
  • Length: 10 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,403
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,471
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,438

The Newest Oprah Book Club 2016 Selection. Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood - where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned - Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stupendous book, hard to follow in audio

  • By JQR on 12-01-16

An American Horror Story, Beautifully Wrought

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-03-17

If you could sum up The Underground Railroad (Oprah's Book Club) in three words, what would they be?

Magnificently told history.

What other book might you compare The Underground Railroad (Oprah's Book Club) to and why?

This book carries the same theme as many that tell the shameful story of slavery and its effects, a horrible scar on our nation that has yet to heal. Like Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin" to Sue Monk Kidd's "The Invention of Wings," it chronicles the human imperative to be free. Yet it is a freshly told tale. Through its main character Cora, a Georgia slave girl, it is a poetic and touching version of the slavery story. It chronicles the hope that arises from the darkest pit of cruelty to the light of human kindness at the other end.

Which character – as performed by Bahni Turpin – was your favorite?

Cora, the slave girl who escapes via the Underground Railroad (a literal railroad, which is a deft convention) to a life beyond shackles, but can never be truly free from the damage of her past.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes. I found any excuse I could to take walks and listen yet dreaded finishing.

Any additional comments?

The author's words are spare and poetic. His simple sentences evoke the best and worst of the characters and situations he describes. The listener/reader is thrust back in time to an era of unspeakable treatment of blacks and forced to look at its ugliness full in the face. Whithead's writing could not be more economical, yet his words are precisely the right words that cut to the heart of his message. I came away with an abiding respect for human resilience via Cora and an uplifting belief that, in the end, the good in people stands out.

The narrator Bahni Turpin could not have done a better job of gliding smoothly from character to character, whether good, evil, old, young, black or white, with complete competence and clarity.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Trespasser

  • A Novel
  • By: Tana French
  • Narrated by: Hilda Fay
  • Length: 20 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,297
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,725
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,688

Being on the murder squad is nothing like Detective Antoinette Conway dreamed it would be. Her partner, Stephen Moran, is the only person who seems glad she's there. The rest of her working life is a stream of thankless cases, vicious pranks, and harassment. Antoinette is savagely tough, but she's getting close to the breaking point. Their new case looks like yet another by-the-numbers lovers' quarrel gone bad. Aislinn Murray is blond, pretty, groomed to a shine, and dead in her catalogue-perfect living room, next to a table set for a romantic dinner.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A literary mystery

  • By lesley on 10-08-16

In-depth police procedural

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-17-16

Would you consider the audio edition of The Trespasser to be better than the print version?

I did not read the print edition, but the narration of Hilda Fay brought Antoinette Conway to life. Her accent rang true and it was easy to distinguish which character was talking. Her portrayal of Breslin made me want to punch him.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Trespasser?

Conway's interview with Lucy, the murder victim's best friend, was poignant as well as skillful. It was so beautifully written that you felt you were in the room.

What does Hilda Fay bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Conway's Dublin accent and the level of her anger, which might not have been obvious in print but was important to the story.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

A fairy tale gone wrong

Any additional comments?

Tana French writes wonderful detective stories about the Dublin murder squad, but they are far from routine. She gets inside a detective's head and weaves his/her personal story in with the mystery at hand to inform the action. She makes clear that there are gray areas in how police operate, and doesn't settle for the obvious black-and-white solution. I loved the way this book took you inside the interrogation room and revealed many of the tricks that police use to elicit the truth from suspects. French also explains the loyalty that pervades the police force and the lengths detectives will go to protect it.Antoinette Conway, the main character in "The Trespasser," is a smart, strong detective. She just doesn't know it yet. I hope we will hear more from her.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Little Life

  • A Novel
  • By: Hanya Yanagihara
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 32 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,173
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,527
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,534

When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they're broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I had to call in SAD to work

  • By Angela on 10-17-15

Not for everyone, but a brilliant work of art.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-22-15

Would you consider the audio edition of A Little Life to be better than the print version?

I didn't read the print edition but the audio really brought the story and characters to life.

What did you like best about this story?

Its brave exploration of how hard it is for victims of unimaginable childhood abuse to leave the shame and self-hatred behind, no matter how successful the majority of their life.

Which scene was your favorite?

Hard to pick a favorite but I think I appreciated best the scenes where Willem coaxes the truth out of Jude simply by holding and reassuring him that Willem is worthy of Jude's trust.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Not really, because each layer was more and more disturbing and it was hard to take except in small doses. I listened to it on my daily walks and could go for miles without realizing I had done so.

Any additional comments?

This is a brilliant novel, not necessarily for everyone. But it gets to the heart of some very disturbing facts of life that even true friendship can't overcome. The character of Jude particularly is one I will never forget. I find myself thinking of him as real, and will never stop wishing that he could have believed those who loved him that he was worthy of their praise; that his life was worth living. This novel took me to places I never thought I'd want to go, but it made me understand the profound suffering of the abused. I am more compassionate because of it.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Silence of Ghosts

  • A Novel
  • By: Jonathan Aycliffe
  • Narrated by: Roger Clark
  • Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13

Dominic Lancaster hoped to prove himself to his family by excelling in the Navy during World War II. Instead he is wounded while serving as a gunner, and loses his leg. Still recovering from his wounds and the trauma of his amputation when the Blitz begins, Dominic finds himself shuffled off to the countryside by his family, along with his partially deaf sister, Octavia.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Spooky story. All it lacks is the campfire.

  • By darylp on 10-09-15

Spooky story. All it lacks is the campfire.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-15

Where does The Silence of Ghosts rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Very entertaining, mostly due to the narrator, Roger Clark. He can scare the heck out of you just by whispering. I don't read many ghost stories but this one is compelling and has the added benefit of historical perspective.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Octavia. Never a friendlier nor more appealing ghost.

What does Roger Clark bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

I can't say enough about this narrator. He has the ability to be all characters, including women and children, without being obvious or patronizing. His narration never detracts from the story but carries the listener through it as if he/she were there. He's a natural story-teller.

If you could rename The Silence of Ghosts, what would you call it?

Well, they aren't really silent.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Shadow on the Wall

  • A Novel
  • By: Jonathan Aycliffe
  • Narrated by: Roger Clark
  • Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 27

In the countryside of Victorian England, Edward Atherton, rector of Thornham St. Stephen, has taken on the arduous task of restoring the ancient church. But he should never have meddled with the tomb that lay beneath the church's crumbling walls. The moment the workman raises the tomb lid, an unspeakable horror escapes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very enjoyable and wonderful narration

  • By sidhecat on 08-15-15

Good ghost story expertly told

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-15

What did you love best about A Shadow on the Wall?

Listening to Roger's Clark's narration of this spooky story by Jonathan Aycliffe was like being back around the campfires of my youth listening to ghost stories. I listened to this book while on long walks and more than once was so absorbed that I forgot where I was. A couple of times I jumped when my concentration was interrupted by a passerby. Totally engrossing...

What did you like best about this story?

I love this story because it appeals to the imagination and the author does not try and wrap things up at the end with a logical explanation. He crafts enough ambiguity to leave the reader with a chill and perhaps expecting a sequel. Roger Clark's narration adds just the right tone to this Victorian-era ghost story.

Which character – as performed by Roger Clark – was your favorite?

My favorite character was the narrator, Asquith, a Cambridge professor who was open-minded enough to figure out the strange happenings in an old church even though he was a rational thinker and a skeptic. His vulnerability made him a particularly sympathetic character, especially when the late-breaking love of his life is threatened by evil. Most of us would have ignored the pleas of his fellow scholar Matthew Atherton who asked Asquith to investigate evil doings at the church, rather than put our lives and those of our loved ones at risk.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

This book was certainly scary, a quality enhanced by the expert narration of Roger Clark. His professional rendering of the ghastly events was compelling, understated and suspenseful. I was thrust into the story immediately, forgetting that it was being read to me, but feeling like I was there. Clark's reading made the scholarship and frequent latin words embedded in the story interesting rather than dry.

Any additional comments?

A good ghost story, a perfect narrator, compelling characters and a gothic setting made "The Shadow on the Wall" a thoroughly entertaining experience.

  • Beware This Boy

  • By: Maureen Jennings
  • Narrated by: Roger Clark
  • Length: 9 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15

November, 1940. Tom Tyler, Detective Inspector of the small Shropshire town of Whitchurch, is a troubled man. The preceding summer had been a dark one for Britain, and even darker for Tom's own family and personal life. So he jumps at the opportunity to help out in the nearby city of Birmingham, where an explosion in a munitions factory has killed or badly injured several of the young women who have taken on dangerous work in support of the war effort.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dark story brought to life by expert narrator.

  • By darylp on 08-08-15

Dark story brought to life by expert narrator.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-08-15

If you could sum up Beware This Boy in three words, what would they be?

Gripping. Vivid. Exceptional.

What did you like best about this story?

The story that begins with an explosion in an English munitions factory during WWII is not only a murder mystery, but a chronicle of this dark chapter in history. You feel the fear, hear the bombs and relate to the devastation and despair that the German bombers left in their wake. The plight of individuals families makes it all the more poignant.

What about Roger Clark’s performance did you like?

Roger Clark's narration gives this story its drama and its punch. Maureen Jennings is a very good writer, but Clark's rendering of her novel elevates it to a top-notch tale. His mastery of accents -- English, German, Czech, Russian and American -- is amazing. He makes clear who is speaking, whether man or woman, young or old, with subtlety and authenticity. He never faulters in his task - to tell a good story. His strength is particularly evident in a scene in which police inspector Tom Tyler interviews no less than 12 women at the factory. The reader never loses touch with who is speaking. Bravo!

Who was the most memorable character of Beware This Boy and why?

Brian, the deserter. Through Jennings' descriptions and Clark's excellent voicing of Brian's words and thoughts, we understand how war has transformed a decent young man into a brutal killer. His ability to deny his actions makes them even more chilling. Ditto for Donnie, the punk who blackmails Brian.

Any additional comments?

This was a much darker story than "No Known Grave," an important picture of daily village life destroyed by the horrors of war. Ms Jennings, and her excellent narrator Roger Clark, do not sugar-coat events nor embellish them, but allow them to speak for themselves. The scene in the mortuary comes to mind.
I would buy other books narrated by Clark.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • No Known Grave

  • By: Maureen Jennings
  • Narrated by: Roger Clark
  • Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18

It's summer, 1942, and after a tough couple of years, DI Tom Tyler is making a fresh start in Ludlow, Shropshire. On the outskirts of town, St. Anne's Convalescent Hospital, staffed by nursing sisters who are Anglican nuns, has been established in an old manor house to help victims of the war to recover. After a horrifying double murder is discovered on the grounds, Tyler must figure out how the crime could have occurred in such a secluded and presumably impenetrable place.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Well done

  • By Maine Knitter on 04-29-17

Good story, great reader

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-15

What made the experience of listening to No Known Grave the most enjoyable?

“No Known Grave” by Maureen Jennings is a five-star “read.” It is entertaining and well-written by the woman responsible for the PBS Murdoch mystery series. The whodunit is gripping and had me grabbing for the earphones at every spare minute to find out what happens next. But what lifts this audio book above other crime novels is the storyteller, Roger Clark.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Clark's narration made these characters so vivid that long after finishing the audio book I can still hear their voices and picture the quaint town and hospital grounds. One particularly moving scene involved the police inspector, Tom Tyler, interviewing a small boy whose father and brother had been shot to death in front of him. Clark's sensitive rendering of this difficult scene brought me to tears.

What does Roger Clark bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Roger Clark's subtle shifts of tone make it clear which character is speaking, whether it be the intrepid inspector Tom Tyler, the nuns who run St. Anne’s hospital, where three murders take place, or its war-wounded patients. Clark is a professional-- adept not only at telling the story with just the proper drama and suspense, but also at nailing a range of accents and dialects present in this book, from English to Scottish to Austrian. His is an impressive and thoroughly satisfying performance of a first-rate book.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful