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Curmud the prof

  • 10
  • reviews
  • 159
  • helpful votes
  • 75
  • ratings
  • The Fifties

  • By: David Halberstam
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 34 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 89
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 89

The Fifties is a sweeping social, political, economic, and cultural history of the 10 years that Halberstam regards as seminal in determining what our nation is today. Halberstam offers portraits of not only the titans of the age: Eisenhower, Dulles, Oppenheimer, MacArthur, Hoover, and Nixon; but also of Harley Earl, who put fins on cars; Dick and Mac McDonald and Ray Kroc, who mass-produced the American hamburger; Kemmons Wilson, who placed his Holiday Inns along the nation's roadsides; and more.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • one of the very best

  • By Portsman on 09-25-18

What a wild ride!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-19

This book focuses on individuals who lived in and helped bring about a revolution - actually many revolutions - in American life. It really is eye opening to learn what was really happening when we were growing up. Superbly written.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Confessions of an Economic Hitman

  • By: John Perkins
  • Narrated by: Brian Emerson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,065
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,521
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,520

"Economic hit men," John Perkins writes, "are highly paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. Their tools include fraudulent financial reports, rigged elections, payoffs, extortion, sex, and murder."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Story for people have traveled

  • By Robert P. on 06-24-09

More timely than ever.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-17

This should be required reading for all young people in the U. S. and Saudi Arabia, etc., etc., etc. It is a little self serving, but a real eye opener to one who lived through these events.

  • Origin

  • A Novel
  • By: Dan Brown
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 18 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,453
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,973
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36,862

In keeping with his trademark style, Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code and Inferno, interweaves codes, science, religion, history, art, and architecture in this new novel. Origin thrusts Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon into the dangerous intersection of humankind's two most enduring questions - and the earthshaking discovery that will answer them.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Formula over fiction

  • By Evan M Carlson on 11-01-17

Wow!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-14-17

Another formulaic Dan Brown novel, but a wonderfully articulated dialog about science and religion. Beautifully balanced.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Beneath a Scarlet Sky

  • A Novel
  • By: Mark Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 17 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,177
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,834
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,756

Pino Lella wants nothing to do with the war or the Nazis. He's a normal Italian teenager - obsessed with music, food, and girls - but his days of innocence are numbered. When his family home in Milan is destroyed by Allied bombs, Pino joins an underground railroad helping Jews escape over the Alps, and falls for Anna, a beautiful widow six years his senior. In an attempt to protect him, Pino's parents force him to enlist as a German soldier - a move they think will keep him out of combat.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Best Thing? It Really Happened!

  • By Charles Atkinson on 08-07-17

Absolute best WW II book I ever read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-19-17

I wish I could give this book ten stars in every category! While it is a novel because some of the dialog had to be imagined, it is based on real events and real people dealing with the war in Italy, particularly Milan, in 1943 -1945. An absolutely stunning and gripping story. Ironic, but true twists abound.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Life's Engines

  • How Microbes Made Earth Habitable
  • By: Paul G. Falkowski
  • Narrated by: Nick Sullivan
  • Length: 7 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 277
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 243
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 241

Paul Falkowski looks "under the hood" of microbes to find the engines of life, the actual working parts that do the biochemical heavy lifting for every living organism on Earth. With insight and humor, he explains how these miniature engines are built - and how they have been appropriated by and assembled like Lego sets within every creature that walks, swims, or flies. Falkowski shows how evolution works to maintain this core machinery of life, and how we and other animals are veritable conglomerations of microbes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best Science Book Ever Written. Period.

  • By serine on 07-28-15

Not for faint hearted

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-17

This was written by a researcher who is not likely to be a good teacher. Written in a manner the hops around, it is not easy to follow; even for a scientist like myself. The reader confuses magnesium and manganese- not acceptable. The underlying story is important and deserves a better script - and reader.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Behave

  • The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst
  • By: Robert M. Sapolsky
  • Narrated by: Michael Goldstrom
  • Length: 26 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,921
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,901

Why do we do the things we do? More than a decade in the making, this game-changing book is Robert Sapolsky's genre-shattering attempt to answer that question as fully as perhaps only he could, looking at it from every angle. Sapolsky's storytelling concept is delightful, but it also has a powerful intrinsic logic: He starts by looking at the factors that bear on a person's reaction in the precise moment a behavior occurs and then hops back in time from there in stages, ultimately ending up at the deep history of our species and its evolutionary legacy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Insightful

  • By Doug Hay on 07-27-17

A Magnum Opus

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-17

What a work! This book ties together insights ranging from so many disciplines that it defies categorization. Factors influencing human behavior but not determining per se - a major theme) are reviewed and illustrated with countless experimental examples ranging from molecular to societal -with everything in between. Some may find it repetitive but that is the essence of learning. So much detail is included that you should sign up for 15 Medical School credits if you make it to the end. And very importantly the narrator dealt with the big words in a manner was much appreciated by this reviewer - a retired professor of pharmacology.

45 of 48 people found this review helpful

  • The Drug Hunters

  • The Improbable Quest to Discover New Medicines
  • By: Donald R. Kirsch PhD, Ogi Ogas PhD
  • Narrated by: James Foster
  • Length: 7 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,022
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 935
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 935

The search to find medicines is as old as disease, which is to say as old as the human race. Through serendipity - by chewing, brewing, and snorting - some Neolithic souls discovered opium, alcohol, snakeroot, juniper, frankincense, and other helpful substances. Ötzi the Iceman, the 5,000-year-old hunter frozen in the Italian Alps, was found to have whipworms in his intestines and Bronze Age medicine, a worm-killing birch fungus, knotted to his leggings.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Aargh!

  • By Curmud the prof on 05-20-17

Aargh!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-17

As a pharmacologist myself I found the book contained some interesting back stories on the discovery and development of certain drugs. The mechanisms described were simplistic to a fault in some cases. But the pronunciation of many, perhaps most of the drug and chemical names, was awful. For this and similar books we need readers with a background - or extensive tutoring in the field - so that a lay person will hear the big words properly.

102 of 109 people found this review helpful

  • Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!

  • By: Richard P. Feynman
  • Narrated by: Raymond Todd
  • Length: 11 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,677
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,134
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,146

With his characteristic eyebrow-raising behavior, Richard P. Feynman once provoked the wife of a Princeton dean to remark, "Surely you're joking, Mr. Feynman!" But the many scientific and personal achievements of this Nobel Prize-winning physicist are no laughing matter. Here, woven with his scintillating views on modern science, Feynman relates the defining moments of his accomplished life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hilarious and inspiring

  • By Brad Grimm on 11-09-09

Timely even now.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-16

An oldie but a goodie!
What more can I sat?
Stay of F Feynman and Las Vegas hooker just one of diverse diamonds...

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Man Called Ove

  • By: Fredrik Backman
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 9 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63,952
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58,517
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58,419

Meet Ove. He's a curmudgeon - the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him "the bitter neighbor from hell". But behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Laughed and I Cried

  • By Bill on 08-22-15

5 stars not enough

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-16

What more can I say? So beautifully written and translated - and performed! By the way, Owe would not have appreciated being required to use so many words to review the book.. You will have to read it to understand.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overdiagnosed

  • Making People Sick in Pursuit of Health
  • By: Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, Dr. Lisa M. Schwartz, Dr. Steven Woloshin
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 9 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 433
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 385
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 389

Going against the conventional wisdom reinforced by the medical establishment and Big Pharma that more screening is the best preventative medicine, Dr. Gilbert Welch builds a compelling counterargument that what we need are fewer, not more, diagnoses. Documenting the excesses of American medical practice that labels far too many of us as sick, Welch examines the social, ethical, and economic ramifications of a health-care system that unnecessarily diagnoses and treats patients.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Must Read for All!

  • By J. D. Portnoy on 12-07-12

Important insights explained well

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-16

As a researcher and medical educator for 48 years I recommend this as an extremely important book for healthy people, for patients and for all persons in the medical industrial complex - that includes politicians, bureaucrats, insurance company personnel and, yes, even lawyers. We definitely need the suggested paradigm shift - STAT.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful