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Marcus

Brasília, Brazil
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  • The Varieties of Religious Experience

  • By: William James
  • Narrated by: John Pruden
  • Length: 19 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 133
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 109
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 106

First published in 1905, The Varieties of Religious Experience is a collection of lectures given at the University of Edinburgh in 1901 and 1902. William James was a psychologist and, as such, his interest in religion was not that of a theologian but of a scientist. In these 20 lectures, he discusses the nature and origin of religious belief. The average believer is one who has inherited his religion, but this will not do for James's inquiry.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Dense & Insightful

  • By Chris R on 10-20-16

Understanding Religious Experience

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-19

This book contains lectures given by William James in Scotland in which he examines diverse religious experiences in search of their meaning. The lectures formed a systematic work and are written in a clear way. James’s conception of pragmatism - the emphasis in the experimental method and the idea of meaning that dismiss hard/dogmatic truth - influences the exposition. The lectures deal with many personal expositions of religious experiences - the ways in which they are exposed and their meanings for each and everyone involved. James gives his analysis of these various episodes and tries to elaborate a grand narrative. In search of understanding, one finds tolerance toward the diverse religious attitudes. A book worth reading (listening).

  • The Quest for Certainty

  • By: John Dewey
  • Narrated by: Fred Filbrich
  • Length: 10 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6

This volume provides an authoritative edition of Dewey's The Quest for Certainty: A Study of the Relation Between Knowledge and Action. The book is made up of the Gifford Lectures delivered April and May, 1929 at the University of Edinburgh. Writing to Sidney Hook, Dewey described this work as "a criticism of philosophy as attempting to attain theoretical certainty."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Experimental Empiricism

  • By Marcus on 01-03-19

Experimental Empiricism

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-19

Dewey’s thought is presented in this book with clarity and vigor. His concepts about philosophy, its role and meaning; the distinction between ideas (thought) and practice (experience); the epistemology of natural science and social science are exposed and discussed. The book in some way constitutes a history of philosophy, at least of the tradition of philosophy that identify knowledge with the concept of the ultimate things and values (the real). Dewey argues that knowledge is obtained in experience, provides one works with the proper method. Experience is contingent, unpredictable. Dewey insists that it provides knowledge. Abstract and universal ideas and values as such must be abandoned as a source of knowledge. Their utility in human endeavors is an indication of their epistemological value. This is a book worth reading, specially for students of philosophy and pragmatism.

  • John Dewey & the High Tide of American Liberalism

  • By: Alan Ryan
  • Narrated by: Eric Michael Summerer
  • Length: 21 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17

When John Dewey died in 1952, he was memorialized as America's most famous philosopher, revered by liberal educators and deplored by conservatives, but universally acknowledged as his country's intellectual voice. Many things conspired to give Dewey an extraordinary intellectual eminence: He was immensely long-lived and immensely prolific; he died in his 93rd year, and his intellectual productivity hardly slackened until his 80s.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fine biography

  • By R. M. Lucas on 07-21-13

Pragmatism and Democracy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-18

Alan Ryan’s work gives the reader a clear exposition of Dewey’s main ideas, their meaning and role in his intellectual development. The book is readable, the text clear and fluid. Alan Ryan examines Dewey’s works in context and establishes a dialogue between the american philosopher and his critics (of the past and contemporary). Dewey’s concept of education, experience and pragmatism are well exposed and criticized. The idea of democracy that emerges from Dewey’s reflections is linked with communitarianism and pluralism. One can easily get such things when they get rid of metaphysics. This is an excellent introduction to Dewey’s work.

  • Law in American History 

  • Volume 1: From the Colonial Years Through the Civil War
  • By: G. Edward White
  • Narrated by: Graeme Spicer
  • Length: 26 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 30
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 28

In the first of the three volumes of his projected comprehensive narrative history of the role of law in America from the colonial years through the twentieth century, G. Edward White takes up the central themes of American legal history from the earliest European settlements through the Civil War.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A delight for those with deep law interest

  • By Philo on 07-25-14

Law and Contingency

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-18

This is the first of two volumes that deal with the historical sources of American Law and its development. The idea of law that came in America with the english settlers and its religion routs, the exchange between the english common law and the law of Native Americans, the incorporation of racism in the law and the development of real state law are some points discussed by Edward White. The author’s exposition is clear and the book succeeds in explaining the historical process behind the formation and development of the law. One can guess that a great deal of legal rules were born in direct response to historical facts that emerged randomly. Contingency has an important role in law’s creation and development.

  • Civil Liberties and the Bill of Rights

  • By: John E. Finn, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: John E. Finn
  • Length: 18 hrs and 3 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 182
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 160

The civil liberties and constitutional rights possessed by our nation's citizens-not only in theory, but in the courtroom, where the state can be forced to honor those liberties-are a uniquely American invention.And when we were taught history and learned about the Constitution and its Bill of Rights, we were always made aware of that uniqueness, of the extraordinary experiment that gave to every citizen of this new nation a gift possessed by no others.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great overview of the Bill of Rights per the Law.

  • By Kristi R. on 10-05-15

Understanding the American Constitution

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-18

One cannot understand the meaning of civil liberties without knowing its historical background. American constitutional law developed in direct relation with the making of the United States. Professor Finn exposed this process and gave to the listener the reasons behind the particular way of formation of the civil liberties and the bill of rights. With that in mind one can grasp its meaning and appreciate its values for a democratic commonwealth. Its translation to others westerners democracies is a whole other story.

  • American Legal History: A Very Short Introduction

  • By: G. Edward White
  • Narrated by: Jason Huggins
  • Length: 4 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8

Law has played a central role in American history. From colonial times to the present, law has not just reflected the changing society in which legal decisions have been made-it has played a powerful role in shaping that society, though not always in positive ways. In this Very Short Introduction, eminent legal scholar G. Edward White - author of the ongoing, multi-volume Law in American History - offers a compact overview that sheds light on the impact of law on a number of key social issues.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Development of Law in America

  • By Marcus on 07-07-18

The Development of Law in America

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-18

Distinct moments in the formation of american legal system are pointed and explained in this short book. The historical landscape and its reflections in the law are explained in order to give the reader a comprehensive view of the field. With sections about natives tribes’ law, African-American traditions and distinct patterns of colonizations in America with its law developments, the book provides useful informations. Good overview. Readable introduction. Profitable reading.

  • Fundamental Cases

  • The Twentieth-Century Courtroom Battles That Changed Our Nation - The Modern Scholar
  • By: Alan M. Dershowitz
  • Narrated by: Alan M. Dershowitz
  • Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 233
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130

It was Alexis de Tocqueville who, when he visited the new republic for the first time, said that America was a unique country when it comes to law. Every great issue eventually comes before the courts. With this in mind, esteemed professor and civil liberties lawyer Alan Dershowitz looks at history through the prism of the trial, which presents a snapshot of what's going on in a particular point in time of the nation's history.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I'd rather be able to rate each section.

  • By Amazon Customer on 10-30-10

The Development of Law in America

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

Law in America is at some degree a judge made law. This course provides a glimpse in some of the most important Supreme Court’s decisions and traces its understanding of the Constitution. The various approaches of its text are exposed and linked with political facts and manifestations of others branches of government. Professor Friedman describes the Supreme Court jurisprudence in a clear and enlightening way.

  • The Modern Scholar

  • World War l: The Great War and the World It Made
  • By: Professor John Ramsden
  • Narrated by: John Ramsden
  • Length: 8 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 300
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 211
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 203

"The Great War", as it was known at the time, was also said to be the "war to end all wars." It seized all of Europe and much of the rest of the world in its grip of death and destruction. The first truly modern war, it changed how war and peace would be conducted throughout the remainder of the 20th century and even to the present.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent & Interesting Course

  • By IRP on 10-29-08

Europe in World War I

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-18

This course concentrates in explaining the politics in early twentieth century Europe. John Ramsden tries to expose Europe’s context when World War I occurred, its causes and consequences. The lectures drawn between the various countries involved in the conflict and its most important facts (battles). At the end the listener got a better understanding of this pivotal moment in world history.

  • The Rights of Man and Common Sense (Revolutions Series)

  • Peter Linebaugh presents Thomas Paine
  • By: Thomas Paine, Peter Linebaugh
  • Narrated by: John Chancer
  • Length: 14 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35

Published to commemorate the bicentennial of Thomas Paine's death, these texts have remained two of the most influential arguments for liberty in political thought. Common Sense is a pamphlet that Paine wrote in support of American independence. Thanks to its original and simple style, it spread like wildfire through the colonies, helping to inspire the American Revolution. Rights of Man is Paine's passionate defence of the French Revolution that led to his trial for sedition and libel.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Utterly boring narrator

  • By Anonymous User on 01-06-19

The Equality’s Utopia

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-18

Thomas Paine’s words illuminated the world in which America was born and gave inspiration to the men and women that came from Europe to this new land. Its described some aspects of the political landscape of the time in England, France and America. The reading (listening) of these works shared light about the French Revolution and its implications. One also had a better understanding of the disputes involving Paine and Edmund Burke. Above all, these books presented Paine’s argument for equality in a world of established social hierarchies.

  • The Modern Scholar: Ethics: A History of Moral Thought

  • By: Professor Peter Kreeft
  • Narrated by: Peter Kreeft
  • Length: 8 hrs and 31 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 364
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 252
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 250

This course addresses some of the eternal questions that man has grappled with since the beginning of time. What is good? What is bad? Why is justice important? Why is it better to be good and just than it is to be bad and unjust? Most human beings have the faculty to discern between right and wrong, good and bad behavior, and to make judgments over what is just and what is unjust. But why are ethics important to us?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Surprisingly Good

  • By J. Maxwell on 11-02-09

The Idea of the Good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-18

This course provides an overview of moral philosophy, with emphasis in greek philosophy (Socrates, Plato and Aristotle). The lectures are organized in order to develop an dialogue between the various philosophers in a way that gives to the listener a better understanding of the diversity of thought. Particularly good is the lecture about Maquiavel. Particularly bad is the omission of pragmatism thought (Pierce, Dewey and James) and its idea of moral philosophy. One has in this course a good introduction in the matter.