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Alan Winterrowd

Bluffton, IN USA
  • 25
  • reviews
  • 85
  • helpful votes
  • 205
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  • Still Life with Crows

  • By: Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child
  • Narrated by: Rene Auberjonois
  • Length: 6 hrs and 9 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 963
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 329
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 334

Medicine Creek, Kansas, has been slowly dying for the last century. In a town where nothing changes, the community is terrified after a series of grisly murders takes place. Even more alarming, the bodies are displayed in bizarre tableaus. With the entire town in shock, FBI Agent Pendergast arrives from New Orleans to investigate. From the fields to the local caves, Pendergast discovers the remnants of a Prohibition-era moonshine operation and the truth behind one of the town's greatest mysteries.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So Exciting! Like watching a film!

  • By Venice on 08-20-03

Solid, but unspectacular

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-17

A bit of a disappointment, from the expectations that Pendergast saga had led me to expect. Linear, with cookie cutter characters. It is readable/listenable, but not one that is going to be memorable.

  • The Collapsing Empire

  • The Interdependency, Book 1
  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,076
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,208
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,165

Our universe is ruled by physics, and faster-than-light travel is not possible - until the discovery of The Flow, an extradimensional field we can access at certain points in space-time that transports us to other worlds, around other stars. Humanity flows away from Earth, into space, and in time forgets our home world and creates a new empire, the Interdependency, whose ethos requires that no one human outpost can survive without the others. It's a hedge against interstellar war - and a system of control for the rulers of the empire.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Dumb

  • By clifford on 02-05-18

Bland power politics rather than story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-23-17

This book is space fantasy masquerading as science fiction. A feudal/guild based interplanetary civilization, with a very unconvincing method of interplanetary travel. It also gives us largely 20th century technology excepting the ability for space travel.

Characters are cliche, plot is simply another feudal power struggle that could be transplanted into Game of Thrones or Empire with little change.

Will Wheaton was OK but little more that that. He seems unable to create characters that transcend his own voice, especially when angry or sarcastic, which is most of the book.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Fool Moon

  • The Dresden Files, Book 2
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 10 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,690
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,655
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,605

Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden is Chicago's only openly practicing wizard. He is also dead broke. His vast knowledge and magical skills are unfortunately matched by his talent for making powerful enemies and alienating friends. With little more than his integrity left, he accepts an offer of work from Lt. Karin Murphy of Chicago's Special Investigations Unit. He wants to redeem himself in Murphy's eyes and make enough money to quiet his rumbling stomach.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of the best books I've read in a long time!

  • By David Ziegler on 05-06-10

Solid, but with issues

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-16

A good book, but the reading needed better editing. Quite a few mispronounced words and at least one glaring use of the wrong name.

  • The Cabinet of Curiosities

  • A Novel
  • By: Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Marosz
  • Length: 17 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,060
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,782
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,779

In an ancient tunnel underneath New York City a charnel house is discovered. Inside are 36 bodies all murdered and mutilated more than a century ago. While FBI agent Pendergast investigates the old crimes, identical killings start to terrorize the city. The nightmare has begun. Again.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • DrBB

  • By Lois on 01-26-13

Good story, narrator and audio less so

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-16

The 3rd book in the Pendergast series finally lets us into Special Agent Pendergast's mind and history and gives us an interesting look at the history of natural history, in New York at least.

A suspenseful and eerie tale, it does drag for a little while, but in the end, is worth the time to listen.

the narrator was OK, at best. The majority of his sentences are uninflected and end in an abortive vocal fry, almost like he is trying to sound uninterested. The audio was clearly taken from audio CD files and not all of the repeated lines at change of disk have been removed.

On the good side, there are none of the weird echo effects used in the previous book to signal a character thinking rather than talking, so that is a positive.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Skin Game

  • A Novel of the Dresden Files, Book 15
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 15 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 19,680
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 18,346
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 18,270

Harry Dresden, Chicago's only professional wizard, is about to have a very bad day.… Because as Winter Knight to the Queen of Air and Darkness, Harry never knows what the scheming Mab might want him to do. Usually, it’s something awful. He doesn’t know the half of it… Mab has just traded Harry’s skills to pay off one of her debts. And now he must help a group of supernatural villains - led by one of Harry’s most dreaded and despised enemies, Nicodemus Archleone - to break into the highest-security vault in town, so that they can then access the highest-security vault in the Nevernever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hold onto your staff; Harry’s back.

  • By Don Gilbert on 05-29-14

A bit of a disappointment

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-15-14

I have read and listened to the Dresden series and have enjoyed it, looking forward to each new book, so I was excited when a new book became available.

By the mid-point of the book, I found myself checking the time on the audiobook to see how much longer it was going to be. The first half of the book, in particular, is tedious and formulaic. Harry is filled with angst, Harry is getting his but kicked by practically everything he meets, etc, etc, fifteen books, same stuff. It gets old, especially the angsty whining. They last third of the book moves well and is interesting, but not enough to salvage the book.

There is quite a bit of character expansion for the Dresdenverse as a whole, but the book seems more interested in the meta story and forgot that there was supposed to be a story to tell in this book.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Execution of Sherlock Holmes:

  • And Other New Adventures of the Great Detective (Unabridged)
  • By: Donald Thomas
  • Narrated by: John Telfer
  • Length: 11 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 135
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 121
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 123

Drugged, manacled, condemned to a dank cell in the depths of London's infamous Newgate prison, the world's greatest literary detective awaits execution by a vengeful crew of formidable enemies. Escape is impossible; death, a certainty. But not for Sherlock Holmes, who, in a stunning display of intellect and derring-do, will elude his hangman's noose and live to fiddle, spy, and ratiocinate another day.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not the "real" Holmes, but reasonably close

  • By J. Waggoner on 10-08-12

VIctorian minutae, poor pastiche

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-13

This book contains five longish short stories, the first of which is pretty good, the remainder vary from mediocre to tediously poor. To his credit, the author has spent a good amount of time studying the Victorian era, but at several times he goes into long boring displays of this study, like an 8 year old explaining his Pokeman deck to an uninterested adult.

The author does a double dose of Holmsian name-dropping, enough to make it a drinking game if you wish. On the other hand, Thomas seems to have a poor grasp of Doyle's classic characters:

Holmes is more waspish and insulting than I would prefer, but falls within a reasonable continuum of interpretation. Audible has an excellent three volume Holmes set in which Charles Griffin does a much more acerbic interpretation of Holmes, using Doyle's own words.

Watson gets significantly poorer treatment. While Doyle's Watson often shows frustration with his gifted friend, Thomas's Watson whines continuously, ignores instructions, and seems more angry with Holmes than loyal to him.

The poorest treatment, however, is reserved for Mycroft Holmes. Thomas should have created a third Holmes brother if he was going to create a completely new character. Doyle gives Holmes an older brother who is Sherlock's intellectual equal, but too lethargic to do his own legwork; a man who at times "is the British Government" and is deeply involved in the intelligence community. Thomas gives us a whiny, petty functionary, who is worries about Sherlock embarrassing the family and has the brains of a newt.

In the end, to paraphrase Monty Python, this is not a book for reading, this is a book for standing back and avoiding.

Hallowe'en Party audiobook cover art
  • Hallowe'en Party

  • By: Agatha Christie
  • Narrated by: John Moffatt
  • Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50

Mystery writer Ariadne Oliver chaperones a Halloween party for a group of teenagers, one a talkative lass known for telling tall tales. In fact, Ariadne hears Joyce Reynolds brag that she has witnessed a murder. But when Joyce is found drowned in an apple-bobbing tub, Ariadne wonders if the girl was too close to the truth, and too close to a killer. Unmasking the culprit is a job for Hercule Poirot.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Excellent Piorot Mystery

  • By Tomsde on 02-23-12

A well delivered favorite

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-13

I am a big Agatha Christie fan, and have most of the audiobooks available here on Audible. While Hugh Fraser has been my favorite narrator for a long time, John Moffat blows this book out of the water. He delivers distinct characters, but may be at his best when reading non-dialog portions of the text.

This is one of Christie's later stories, and is one of her best. Character development is very strong and the storytelling and the plotting show a mature professionalism. This avoids most of Christie's more overused trope's delivering a unique experience. A must read/listen for any devoted Christie fan!

  • The Dark Worlds of H. P. Lovecraft, Volume 1

  • By: H. P. Lovecraft
  • Narrated by: Wayne June
  • Length: 3 hrs and 30 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,005
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 902
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 889

Hailed by literary critics as the inventor of modern-day horror, H. P. Lovecraft is the cultivating force behind such modern writers as Robert Bloch, Wes Craven and Stephen King. The Dark Worlds of H. P. Lovecraft, Volume One is a collection of his best-known tales narrated for the first time by Wayne June and includes both "The Dunwich Horror" (published in the summer of 1926) and "The Call of Cthulhu" (published in the summer of 1928).

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Series for those who love Lovecraft...

  • By Edward on 11-28-10

Fantastic, bother story and reader

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-29-11

Two of Lovecraft's best known classic stories are given a horrific, terrifying life in this reading. While I feel the exquisite disquiet that Lovecraft's best works cause are best felt from reading the stories oneself, Wayne June does an amazing job with these stories. I look forward to getting the rest of the collection!

  • Dust and Shadow

  • An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson
  • By: Lyndsay Faye
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,104
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,633
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,619

Breathless and painstakingly researched, this is a stunning debut mystery in which Sherlock Holmes unmasks Jack the Ripper. Lyndsay Faye perfectly captures all the color and syntax of Conan Doyle’s distinctive nineteenth-century London.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent!

  • By Wadie on 01-07-11

Combines two favorites

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-11

As a longtime Holmes fan and also a little bit of a Ripperologist, this book was too tempting to pass up. Lyndsay Faye gets the voice of Watson near pitch perfect. It was not long before I was simply immersed in the story, without consciously thinking about the fact that it was a pastiche. The author also does not fall into the trap of spending too much time on Holme's "parlor trick" readings of minutia.

The most serious issue, for an author, in a Holmes vs Ripper story, is "if Holmes succeeded, why don't we know about it?" Faye handles this issue with a new, and intriguing style.

A note about the reader. Simon Vance is quickly becoming a favorite of mine, here on Audible. He can handle various ages, genders and accents with ease, creating characters that feel individual and who never grate on the nerves or bring the listener out of the book and back to the reader.

16 of 18 people found this review helpful

The Tuesday Club Murders audiobook cover art
  • The Tuesday Club Murders

  • 13 Miss Marple Mysteries
  • By: Agatha Christie
  • Narrated by: Joan Hickson
  • Length: 6 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 269
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 178
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 178

The unifying premise for this short-story collection is the Tuesday Club: six people who meet socially one evening at Jane Marple's home and then decide to meet regularly each Tuesday night to solve a mystery that a group member must relate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Queen of Crime & the best Miss Marple, Joan!

  • By moonshroob on 10-20-11

I love Miss M, but ...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-11

I love Miss Marple mysteries, overall I think they are better written than Christie's other works. I am also a fan of Joan Hickson's interpretation of Miss M, on television. I expected to fully enjoy this book. Unfortunately, Hickson's voice is very weak for an audiobook reading, and she does not do a very good job of portraying the characters.

The other problem with this book is that the stories are not particularly interesting. All are told in the past tense, while the "Club" is taking tea, and they tend to turn of fairly obscure points. Overall, they tend to be, and I hate to say it, boring.

I can listen to Miss Marple's novels over and over again, but I have had a hard time getting through this collection once.

4 of 9 people found this review helpful