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ReductiMat

Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • Elysium Fire

  • By: Alastair Reynolds
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 17 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 558
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 516
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 515

Ten thousand city-state habitats orbit the planet Yellowstone, forming a near-perfect democratic human paradise. But even utopia needs a police force. For the citizens of the Glitter Band that organization is Panoply, and the prefects are its operatives. Prefect Tom Dreyfus has a new emergency on his hands. Across the habitats and their hundred million citizens, people are dying suddenly and randomly, victims of a bizarre and unprecedented malfunction of their neural implants.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Reynolds fan left cold

  • By Zach on 01-25-18

I’m glad I don’t take reviews seriously

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-08-18

If you’ve read Alastair’s other books and liked them, or better yet have listened to John Lee narrate them and you don’t like it, it’s you.

This was a fantastic book through and through.

  • The Dark Forest

  • By: Cixin Liu, Joel Martinsen - translator
  • Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
  • Length: 22 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,868
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,452
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,445

This near-future trilogy is the first chance for English-speaking listeners to experience this multiple-award-winning phenomenon from Cixin Liu, China's most beloved science fiction author. In The Dark Forest, Earth is reeling from the revelation of a coming alien invasion - in just four centuries' time. The aliens' human collaborators may have been defeated, but the presence of the sophons, the subatomic particles that allow Trisolaris instant access to all human information, means that Earth's defense plans are totally exposed to the enemy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-25-15

Saved

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-29-17

The first book blew me away. As in the author should be slotted into the, "Generational" category.

Book two was shaping up the same way until I took issue with a major plot development. I was unable to suspend belief any further.

I had written off the book, but within the final minutes Cixin redeemed himself.

My only trepidation going forward towards book three is that I'm hoping Cixin cements his status as one of the best sci fi authors of all time and that book one wasn't an outlier.

  • Buried Deep

  • A Retrieval Artist Novel
  • By: Kristine Kathryn Rusch
  • Narrated by: Jay Snyder
  • Length: 12 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 477
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 269
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 267

Forensic anthropologist Aisha Costard has been summoned to Mars to examine skeletal remains recently discovered beneath a building erected by the Disty aliens. The bones belong to a human woman who vanished 30 years ago with her children.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best in the series

  • By Christopher on 07-29-09

I wanted to like it

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-13

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

I hesitate writing a negative review, but this is the first series I've audibly complained to while listening.

For what it's worth, I love Peter Hamilton, Alistair Reynolds, S.A. Corey, Dan Simmons, China Mieville and so many others.

This series is pure fantasy written in the future. If you are looking to find the polar opposite of hard SF, this is your cup of tea. It reminds me of Kirk-era Star Trek writing.

Would you ever listen to anything by Kristine Kathryn Rusch again?

Probably not.

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

This is an ambiguous question that is difficult to answer.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Dissapointment.

There were simply too many unbelievable machinations I was required to accept. I'm not speaking of the "Somewhat unrealistic" flavour, rather it's of the "Are you f'in kidding me?" variety.

I'll save specific instances so as not to ruin anyone else's enjoyment of the book. Needless to say, the chances of the world the main characters live in coming to fruition are smaller than me spontaneously changing genders.

The main characters are decent enough, but so many of the powerful, ruling-class characters that make their way into the stories lead me to believe they are timid pre-teens with sub-50 IQ's transferred into older hosts.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Antifragile

  • Things That Gain from Disorder
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,768
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,204
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,193

In The Black Swan Taleb outlined a problem, and in Antifragile he offers a definitive solution: how to gain from disorder and chaos while being protected from fragilities and adverse events. For what Taleb calls the "antifragile" is actually beyond the robust, because it benefits from shocks, uncertainty, and stressors, just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension. The antifragile needs disorder in order to survive and flourish. Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • How to focus on impact instead of risk

  • By E. Smakman on 05-03-13

Great book ruined by small minded idiots

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-13

What made the experience of listening to Antifragile the most enjoyable?

What made it least enjoyable was some small group of cretins at Random House who decided they should censor various words with which they have trouble with.

I suggest to anyone who can't handle the word bull $hit and the like should go back to reading picture books.

Random House, you should be ashamed.

What does Joe Ochman bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He performed great.