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Wendy

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I would love more from this author!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-19

I simply loved this book. My career has been in women's health care and the birth stories are all too familiar. This story traces the life of a German Midwife during WWII in Germany... from the camps to becoming a midwife to a very important mother-to-be. I won't spoil the plot here, but the feelings of hope and rebirth are paramount to the story. Great narrator, great story.... I was sorry to get to the end.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Everything you never knew about plagues

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-19

As a health care professional, medical history has always fascinated me. And this book was no exception.
Written in a very conversational style with lots of current-day references, Wright weaves the stories of plagues and pandemics to a very readable and enjoyable. She considers not only the health aspects, but the political climate as well. Strong leaders are essential (witness how Reagan ignored HIV/AIDS for years!) for a society to survive.
She has a lot to say about the anti-vax movement and how it jeopardizes the health of the nation and the world.
And next time you want to throw a veiled insult someone's way, just compare them to Walter Jackson Freeman II. You have to read the book to understand why.

Too giggly

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-19

I haven't read Silber's novel, but after this performance I won't. She is nervous, giggly, and everything, every song, every artist is her favorite. I'm sure she's a wonderful vocalist but her voice comes thru as screechy and often uncontrolled.

While I love Fiddler on the Roof, I don't need to know what happened after as a cheap fabrication that never measures up to the original. We are best left to our own imaginations.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Standing Ovation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-19

I felt like I was having coffee with Mrs. Obama while listening to this book. Her insights, goals, tribulations are so sensitively depicted that I have a whole new appreciation of her not only as FLOTUS but as a powerful woman.

I remember her initiatives, all of which match my goals and beliefs... diet and exercise, empowerment, and sensitivity to the racism that still exists in our culture. In many ways, we have not come very far from the days of segregation (and many people want it that way).

I applaud the lengths the Obama's went to as they insured that Malia and Sasha had as normal a childhood as possible while in the White House. Her mother's quiet strength, the family unity, and their achievements are so evident.

Our current first lady will never measure up to what Mrs. Obama stands for, or what she accomplished. Bravo, Michelle!

The Lusitania ....

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-18

I love books that weave history with present day.... and this is no exception. The tragedy of the sinking of the Lusitania in 1915 by a German U-Boat forms the basis of the story. Sarah Blake, a journalist, is researching the story of her great grandfather who had been a steward on the ship, and uncovers one of great mysteries of the war. Why was the Lusitiana sunk?
There are elements of mystery and romance, tragedy and joy.
The story flows nicely between the three women: Caroline, Tess, and Sarah.... each bringing another element to the story.
My only critique is the performance. While I love multiple narrators, some of the imposed English accents sounded like Julie Andrews in Mary Poppins.

I want more!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-28-18

This book took my breath away. The writing was fun, detailed and descriptive; the story intense; and the narration superb! I do not believe for a minute that conversation therapy is needed for LGBT people, in fact, I find it harmful: the destruction of the human spirit to fit into another's mold.
Cameron Post is a young girl, orphaned by a horrendous accident, who falls under the guardianship of her uber-Christian, conservative aunt. When she is discovered to having a blossoming relationship with another adolescent girl, she is sent to God's Promise (yes, full blown conversion therapy under the guise of religion) to recover from her "sinful" ways.
I want to know more... what happened to Cameron after the brilliant last chapter? Where is she today? Has she accepted herself as one who does not need salvation (I don't think any of us really do) but one who is already whole and perfect just as she is.... it's not who you love, but how you love!

Rambling....

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-18

I really looked forward to this book. A memoir of being raised by a crazy evangelical mother (I think she was bipolar as well). I found the memories rambling and hard to keep straight. I liked her occasional humor, but that's about it. Glad it was a short book.

Ripped from the headlines

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-18

Essie is my new hero. I seem to have read a lot of books about downtrodden or abused women. But at least this one has a great ending. I'm reminded of the wackadoodle family on TV with 19 kids.... Children forced to endure endless camera angles and growing up in the spotlight. How normal can they be? Not very....
The parents are portrayed as self righteous, intolerant, and more interested in the money they make with the variety of media exposures they receive, not to mention the mega church.... Essie, forced into a marriage of convenience when it is discovered she is pregnant, has schemes of her own.... not only to save herself, but to save her new husband. A story of redemption for sure.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

One of See's best.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-22-17

After her incredible Snow Flower and Peony, Lisa See seemed to have lost her stride with the next three books (Shanghai Girls, Dreams of Joy, and China Dolls).... but she's recovered!
The additional cast members brought life to this book, which weaves two stories, the lives of two women and the tea that brings them together. Li-yan is a young woman of the Akaa tribe in a remote Chinese village where the mail livelihood comes from the tea. Steeped in tradition, Li-yan is destined to follow her mother as village midwife, yet her heart and soul are far beyond the village. A dedicated student, she begins to learn of the world beyond the spirit gate.
There is a wealth of information about the growing and production of tea which deepens the story. The ancient traditions begin to mesh with the outside world as Li-yan's story unfolds. I found this information fascinating and gave me new respect for the boxes of tea in my pantry.
The plot becomes predictable after a while, but still a delightful story of heritage and tradition and the hearts that bind women together.

Read "The Girl Who Wrote in Silk" instead

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-17

My first hesitation was hearing this was from a Christian bookseller. I'm not a Christian and find a lot of literature too churchy. But that wasn't the case. This book tries to weave two stories about a scarf, first owned by a young nurse at Ellis Island early in the 20th century and later by a fabric salesgirl in modern day New York. The nurse loses her first love in the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire and the salesgirl loses her husband during 9/11. They are both emotionally crippled by their loses and of course, find love at the end. The narrator is a bit histrionic and overplays the drama of 9/11. Do we really need to be re-traumatized? Yes, both of these tragedies played a role in our history, but the book goes for the drama rather than the truth. The scarf plays a role that is not clearly delineated until the very end and then its a weak connection at best. "The Girl Who Wrote in Silk" is a far better portrayal of history blended with current events. I won't be reading any more of Meissner's work. It belongs in the romance category.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful